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Old 10-22-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Chicago.
Clearly Humid continental. Where is the transition. St. Louis would be a better choice.
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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No it is a transitional zone. It has cold winters but hot summers.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
No it is a transitional zone. It has cold winters but hot summers.
You are kidding me, right. It has hot summers with cool nights. Humid subtropical climates have warm & steamy nights in the summer. My sister live there and says it's too cool for comfortably wearing a bikini in Chicago on the lake Michigan beach during summer nights, but she does the same in Coastal Maryland without feeling chilly. See this map and you will find my answer to be more accurate:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...atemapusa2.PNG
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Niagara Falls, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi from the Brunswicks View Post
My sister live there and says it's too cool for comfortably wearing a bikini in Chicago on the lake Michigan beach during summer nights.
False
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Loidis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronan123 View Post
Stockholm can also have mild and rainy winters, even though many of the recent ones have been pretty cold and snowy. And of course winters in stockholm are cold compared to the uk - so are pretty much all of central/western europes winters. That doesen't mean all of central/western europe is Dfb. Record cold months are pretty irrelavant. By that logic Paris would be Dfb too, since they have experienced winter-months with means below -6C.

When i think of Dfb climates, i think of climates that can sustain snowpack for months most winters, even ones that are slightly above average. Stockholms fails that criteria. Helsinki don't. If you would look at a period with mild winters - such as 1990-2000 - the difference in snow-days between those two cities is very large.
I'd consider places like Prague and Munich to be continental too. They are not oceanic in my eyes. They share little in common with my location in the winter, and I consider my climate to be an archetypical oceanic climate - evenly distributed rainfall, mild winters with only fleeting snow cover, usually gone within 24 hours, with many winters having no ice days at all. Also, places like Amsterdam and Brussels don't have cold winters by UK standards.

I can't claim to know much about Stockholm winters, and sure enough they can get mild, rainy winters (all of Europe south of 60n or so can), but the fact that they can get 4 months (late Nov-early Apr) of uninterrupted snow cover in a winter that is only a bit below average, means to me, that they are not oceanic at all. That would not happen in an oceanic climate. Ever. Even in February this year, the snow did not go away, even though it was above average, and if anything the snow got deeper throughout the month. Obviously the low sun angle and cloudiness means places like Stockholm, with pretty tame averages, can retain snow for longer than you might expect, especially compared to places in N America with similar winter temperatures.

And I used January 1987 just as an example of how cold Stockholm can get - the type of cold you will never, ever get here. -22C maxes at a close-to-sea-level location? I'd love to see that happen in this oceanic climate. Also, there are other similarly cold months, so it wasn't just a one-off occurrence.

Anyway, it's pretty odd that I have such an interest in the weather in a city I know little about, but I am smitten with the place. I'd love to live there one day. Even a mild winter in Stockholm would be much better than a normal winter here. I don't want to try and act like I know more about your own country btw. Does the SMHI have any stats for snow cover, snow pack length etc?

Last edited by dunno what to put here; 10-22-2013 at 01:58 PM..
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Motueka), NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I consider my climate to be an archetypical oceanic climate - evenly distributed rainfall
I think the definition of Oceanic climates having evenly distributed rainfall, really just applies to some of those climates. I don't really think it is a feature of Oceanic climates.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Loidis
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Well, your oceanic climate is pretty atypical, while places like Seattle have strong Mediterranean influences, and might even be considered cool Med under some classifications.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Motueka), NZ
14,478 posts, read 10,526,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Well, your oceanic climate is pretty atypical, while places like Seattle have strong Mediterranean influences, and might even be considered cool Med under some classifications.
I don't think it's as simple as that.

I think it's a claim that just doesn't stack up. Even the UK seems to get a bit of variation.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Loidis
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Of course we get a bit of variation - spring is clearly drier than autumn, but it isn't very pronounced. It is very pronounced, however, in the NW of the country, while the south coast does exhibit a dry-summer pattern.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Motueka), NZ
14,478 posts, read 10,526,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Of course we get a bit of variation - spring is clearly drier than autumn, but it isn't very pronounced. It is very pronounced, however, in the NW of the country, while the south coast does exhibit a dry-summer pattern.
When one considers the variation within the UK/Europe, the completely different pattern of the PNW/BC, wide variance in NZ/Australia, not to mention other regions, I just don't see how evenly distributed rainfall can be said to be a feature.

It has been stated as a feature of Oceanic climates for as long as the label has been around,... but is it true?
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