U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-17-2013, 05:58 PM
 
1,257 posts, read 1,924,756 times
Reputation: 1218

Advertisements

4 season climate similar to east coast USA, from Virginia to Boston...

Rules out New Zealand....

NZ doesn't get as warm humid summers and has a too low standard deviation,
record lows are like Florida and warmest place in NZ has upper 70s avg highs (cooler then Boston).

Australia winters are too mild, even extreme south areas like Melbourne.
Australia's coolest climates are closer to US west coast climates, not US east coast.

Same with Argentina, IMO no real match there.

Parts of Japan, Korea, and China are a closer fit climatically.
Though precipitation patterns in asia are a lot different. Way more extreme.
Very dry winters, very wet summers (monsoon),
USA east coast has much more even annual precip.

Parts of eastern Europe also can come close,
like Romania, Hungary, Slovakia.

Warmest areas of Ontario, Canada are close to match to Boston
but not to anywhere south of CT (except inland from US east coast
with a bit of elevation, for example: Scranton, PA is not too far off Toronto or Windsor climate).
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-17-2013, 09:29 PM
 
Location: PA
19,090 posts, read 9,402,043 times
Reputation: 8077
Quote:
Originally Posted by LRUA View Post
4 season climate similar to east coast USA, from Virginia to Boston...

Rules out New Zealand....

NZ doesn't get as warm humid summers and has a too low standard deviation,
record lows are like Florida and warmest place in NZ has upper 70s avg highs (cooler then Boston).

Australia winters are too mild, even extreme south areas like Melbourne.
Australia's coolest climates are closer to US west coast climates, not US east coast.

Same with Argentina, IMO no real match there.

Parts of Japan, Korea, and China are a closer fit climatically.
Though precipitation patterns in asia are a lot different. Way more extreme.
Very dry winters, very wet summers (monsoon),
USA east coast has much more even annual precip.

Parts of eastern Europe also can come close,
like Romania, Hungary, Slovakia.

Warmest areas of Ontario, Canada are close to match to Boston
but not to anywhere south of CT (except inland from US east coast
with a bit of elevation, for example: Scranton, PA is not too far off Toronto or Windsor climate).
So far from what I see, all of Japan has evenly distributed rainfall. Small parts of South Korea do, while in China it's basically from Shanghai on down to Taiwan that has even rainfall. Seems like the Sea of Japan, combined with Japan's mountainous terrain, and the warm Kuroshio Current (the Pacific equivalent to the Gulf Stream) cancel out the effects of the Siberian High in winter.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,592 posts, read 14,779,430 times
Reputation: 9116
So you didn't think SE Europe is as good of a match because of less precipitation or the smaller annual range?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: PA
19,090 posts, read 9,402,043 times
Reputation: 8077
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
So you didn't think SE Europe is as good of a match because of less precipitation or the smaller annual range?
I'd say the less precipitation. Somewhere like Bucharest is a very good match temperature wise, but it seems like it's too dry to be anywhere near the east coast US. Bucharest is much better matched with a state west of the Mississippi River. Maybe somewhere like Pierre, South Dakota. Likewise, the countries around Romania are more suited for the eastern Central Plains, like Sofia, Bulgaria with Lincoln, Nebraska
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,592 posts, read 14,779,430 times
Reputation: 9116
Milan has east coast levels of precipitation, and more similar summer temperatures, winters just too mild:

MINEOLA, NEW YORK 1981-2010 Monthly Climate Summary

Milan is much less snowy (only 8 in/year). I'd guess the landscape around Bucharest would look noticeably drier than here. Milan might be similar?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:02 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,928 posts, read 11,125,099 times
Reputation: 6212
The eastern US and southeastern Canada have rather high precipitation for one very important reason, the Gulf of Mexico. During late spring and most of summer, the Bermuda High sits off the east coast. The clockwise circulation around it pushes humid air from the gulf and western Atlantic up and over the eastern side of the continent. Systems out of Canada and off the Rockies collide with this air producing precip on average of about every 6 days or so. Also, almost every system that hits the US, exits off the New England coast whether it came from the west coast, up from the south or out of Canada. That makes that region rather stormy by comparison with other places and those systems frequently have cold fronts which stretch farther south. The only other region with a similar situation is parts of eastern Asia particularly norther Japan. However the storms coming out of the interior steppes are drier than the American systems whih have gulf moister, this pattern is basically the same. Storms that originate farther south then turn north, go out to sea near northern Japan or points north most of the time. While there isn't anything quite like the Gulf Stream in the Pacific, the Japan current takes it's place, carrying relatively warm water up the east coast of Asia. it's enough warm water carried north to mix with waters in the Gulf Of Alaska. Many systems that move across the mid latitudes of North American, the North Atlantic and northern Europe are born in the Gulf Of Alaska.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: PA
19,090 posts, read 9,402,043 times
Reputation: 8077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
The eastern US and southeastern Canada have rather high precipitation for one very important reason, the Gulf of Mexico. During late spring and most of summer, the Bermuda High sits off the east coast. The clockwise circulation around it pushes humid air from the gulf and western Atlantic up and over the eastern side of the continent. Systems out of Canada and off the Rockies collide with this air producing precip on average of about every 6 days or so. Also, almost every system that hits the US, exits off the New England coast whether it came from the west coast, up from the south or out of Canada. the makes that region rather stormy by comparison with other places and those systems frequently have cold fronts which stretch farther south. the only other region with a similar situation is parts of eastern Asia particularly norther Japan. However the storms coming out of the interior steppes are drier than the American systems whih have gulf moister, this pattern is basically the same. Storms that originate farther south then turn north, go out to sea near northern Japan or points north most of the time. While there isn't anything quite like the Gulf Stream in the Pacific, the Japan current takes it's place, carrying relatively warm water up the east coast of Asia. it's enough warm water carried north to mix with waters in the Gulf Of Alaska. Many systems that move across the mid latitudes of North American, the North Atlantic and northern Europe are born in the Gulf Of Alaska.
I agree with what you said. I think it's called the Bering Sea Rule what you were describing when it comes to the Gulf of Alaska. Strong typhoons that make their way up to Japan buckle the jet stream and ultimately influences the weather in eastern North America.

The problem with China is that the South China Sea does not extend far into Asia like the Gulf of Mexico does, if you get what I mean. The South China Sea is about 200 miles shorter than the Gulf, and the land distribution in the sea disrupts the flow of water, it's not a smooth motion like in the Gulf which has no land in it. If the Indochina Peninsula was "thinner", I think the precipitation would penetrate deeper into China, rather than having a tighter hug around the coastline
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:12 PM
 
Location: West Coast Wanderer
12,928 posts, read 11,125,099 times
Reputation: 6212
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
I agree with what you said. I think it's called the Bering Sea Rule what you were describing when it comes to the Gulf of Alaska. Strong typhoons that make their way up to Japan buckle the jet stream and ultimately influences the weather in eastern North America.

The problem with China is that the South China Sea does not extend far into Asia like the Gulf of Mexico does, if you get what I mean. The South China Sea is about 200 miles shorter than the Gulf, and the land distribution in the sea disrupts the flow of water, it's not a smooth motion like in the Gulf which has no land in it. If the Indochina Peninsula was "thinner", I think the precipitation would penetrate deeper into China, rather than having a tighter hug around the coastline
^^Yes!!! I know exactly what you are saying. I also agree with you. I was going to mention the South China Sea but could quite put my finger on why it has less of an influence but you nailed it!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,592 posts, read 14,779,430 times
Reputation: 9116
One in interesting match is coastal Maine with Aomori, Japan:

Aomori, Aomori - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BAR HARBOR 3 NW, MAINE - Climate Summary

Coastal Maine northward is the only place on the east coast that has a cold season precipitation maximum. But despite slightly cooler winters, coastal Maine gets far less snow. Winter precipitation events in New England often drag milder ocean air, preventing snow. The Sea of Japan doesn't have a mild air mass sitting over it, and the snowrall Aomori gets looks to be a higher snow:water ratio.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:33 PM
 
Location: PA
19,090 posts, read 9,402,043 times
Reputation: 8077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
^^Yes!!! I know exactly what you are saying. I also agree with you. I was going to mention the South China Sea but could quite put my finger on why it has less of an influence but you nailed it!
Look at these two maps. They are basically what we were both saying, but in pictures.





Notice the precipitation totals follow the boundaries of each body of water almost exactly? West of the western most point it is markedly drier than east of it in both maps. We can also see the influence of the Siberian High in China, further pushing the rain off China's coast and into South Korea and Japan, whereas our weaker North American High allows the moisture to follow less of a curve at the northern end of the country. China's precipitation kinda has like a crescent moon shape to it, whereas ours looks more like a left parenthesis
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top