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Old 01-06-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
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Ok to make this more clear let me give an example, Phoenix, Arizona is dry heat while Orlando, Florida is humid heat. But let's say both the cities have a temperature of 93 degrees in heat index numbers.

So does it really matter if one is dry and one is humid even after that in terms of how it feels then? What about when the wind blows or when you stand in the shades?

Last edited by yyuusr; 01-06-2014 at 06:44 PM..
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Old 01-06-2014, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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I think it means they are as humid as each other if they have the same heat index figures.
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Old 01-06-2014, 06:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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The humid heat has a lower actual temperature but higher humidity. The dry heat has a higher actual temperature but lower humidity. For sitting still, humidity makes less difference, I'd take the humid heat. For moving around / excercising, having your sweat evaporate quickly to cool you off matters, the dry heat is more comfortable. I think wind is more appreciated in the humid heat, for the dry heat the actual temperature is nearer to body temperature so the wind won't provide as much cooling affect. For humid heat, temperature difference is bigger and the wind will help evaporation, counteracting the humidity effect.

Last edited by nei; 01-09-2014 at 11:04 PM..
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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The feel is different, because the humid heat index has humidity adding to the raw heat, whereas in the identical dry heat index it's just the raw heat. When you have an identical heat index, i.e. you feel the same level of heat in both places, you just go with whether you like the feel of low humidity or high humidity. I strongly prefer low humidity myself, so I'd go with the dry heat every time. I'd even go with it if the heat index was significantly hotter, since the humidity itself just makes me miserable.

In terms of standing in the shade, shade will have a far more noticeable cooling effect in dry heat than in humid heat. Wind will also feel better in a dry heat than in a humid heat, since when it's just humid you just get the humidity shoved in your face, whereas with dry heat you have air that feels purer; then again, there's the risk of the dry heat wind exerting a hairdryer effect, which if anything makes it feel hotter. That doesn't usually happen when the wind is only 5 or 10 mph, though.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
669 posts, read 690,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
The feel is different, because the humid heat index has humidity adding to the raw heat, whereas in the identical dry heat index it's just the raw heat. When you have an identical heat index, i.e. you feel the same level of heat in both places, you just go with whether you like the feel of low humidity or high humidity. I strongly prefer low humidity myself, so I'd go with the dry heat every time. I'd even go with it if the heat index was significantly hotter, since the humidity itself just makes me miserable.

In terms of standing in the shade, shade will have a far more noticeable cooling effect in dry heat than in humid heat. Wind will also feel better in a dry heat than in a humid heat, since when it's just humid you just get the humidity shoved in your face, whereas with dry heat you have air that feels purer; then again, there's the risk of the dry heat wind exerting a hairdryer effect, which if anything makes it feel hotter. That doesn't usually happen when the wind is only 5 or 10 mph, though.
Sorry but this feels like a totally fanboyish post that completely contrasts what the other posts above say. I'm having a hard time buying this. The humidity level being the same at identical heat index temps makes much more sense. Why else would they do it then?

Can more people please clarify?
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The humid heat has a lower actual temperature but higher humidity. The dry heat has a higher actual temperature but lower humidity. For sitting still, humidity makes less difference, I'd take the dry heat. For moving around / excercising, having your sweat evaporate quickly to cool you off matters, the dry heat is more comfortable. I think wind is more appreciated in the humid heat, for the dry heat the actual temperature is nearer to body temperature so the wind won't provide as much cooling affect. For humid heat, temperature difference is bigger and the wind will help evaporation, counteracting the humidity effect.
Yes I get all of that, but the question is for a hypothetical situation where the heat index temperatures are the same regardless of if the place is usually considered dry or humid. I am trying to make sure if it makes any difference in that case.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yyuusr View Post
Sorry but this feels like a totally fanboyish post that completely contrasts what the other posts above say. I'm having a hard time buying this.
He didn't contradict anything I said, though he gave a different opinion on which is more comfortable.

Quote:
The humidity level being the same at identical heat index temps makes much more sense. Why else would they do it then?
The same heat index does not mean the humidity level is the same, as I explained earlier.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:53 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yyuusr View Post
Yes I get all of that, but the question is for a hypothetical situation where the heat index temperatures are the same regardless of if the place is usually considered dry or humid. I am trying to make sure if it makes any difference in that case.
That is what I discussed (same heat index)... and I described differences for the dry case (Phoenix) and the humid one (Miami) at the same heat index
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
He didn't contradict anything I said, though he gave a different opinion on which is more comfortable.



The same heat index does not mean the humidity level is the same, as I explained earlier.
You were saying that the wind feels more comfortable in humid heat. He said the exact opposite.

Sorry to the other guy if you were actually right though. What you were saying contrasted the only two other posts.
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Old 01-09-2014, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That is what I discussed (same heat index)... and I described differences for the dry case (Phoenix) and the humid one (Miami) at the same heat index
Ok...so going by your original post, humid heat is more comfortable for air while dry heat is more comfortable for sitting around in shades. What about for just being outside in general?
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