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Old 05-04-2015, 11:48 AM
 
Location: DFW
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Relatively speaking, the temperature doesn't vary a great deal throughout the year in Southern California. But I've noticed that the house doesn't get very warm even when the temperature breaks 90 degrees in December (when the sun's at its lowest point in the sky.) However, there are days in June (when the sun's at its highest point in the sky) where the outdoor high temperature of the day doesn't break 70 degrees. Neither phenomenon is common but both are not unheard of even in a single year. In both cases, the indoor temperature of my home ends up in a comfortable range of 75 to 80 degrees, without the need for AC or cooling. (Keep in mind that a 90+ day in June will bring scorching heat in the home while a below 70 day in December will likely require turning on the heat.)

I've also noticed that the indoor temperatures of my home during the spring months and the fall months tend to be roughly equal but the outdoor temperatures are generally warmer, on average, in the fall than spring. The only difference that might explain this temperature difference is the higher angle of the sun's rays in the spring compared to fall.

Does this seem normal?
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Old 05-04-2015, 11:53 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Makes sense. Sun coming makes a big difference in how much and how fast the house heats up. If it were shaded, it wouldn't make as much difference.
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Old 05-04-2015, 04:37 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
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That's definitely true if the house is unshaded.
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Old 05-05-2015, 03:03 AM
 
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True, my room (without AC - when AC left turned off if I'm not home till after sundown) temp peaked at like 31-32C (88-90F) on sunny days at like 4-5 pm, sun angle 20-30, 1-2 hrs before sundown, my room faces west and recieve sun angle from about 2-40 (3-4 to about 6 pm)
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Old 05-05-2015, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Definitly notice a difference in the way the home warms up in Spring but seems like it's easier in Spring than Fall here. Outside temp makes more a difference IMO but yeah, Sun angle makes a huge difference when its hitting the roof especially if you have dark color shingles.

I have a black roof so while it's great for snow melt and warmth in winter, it sucks for Spring and Summer. It's like the inside of the home is being microwaved.

but if it's 50s outside in winter, the home will warm up with the sun hitting it. only when temps go above 60s/70s is when you feel it really heating up and that's about the time the sun is higher up anyway.
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Old 05-05-2015, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Winds make a difference too. If I have a south wind, full sunshine and air temp in 40s in winter, home will warm up the same way as if I had a North wind, full sun shine, and air temp in 50s in Spring.
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:34 AM
 
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It can be. In my building here it makes a difference. It only makes a bigger difference here in the morning here because the windows of my house face north east, and in the summer the sun rises north of east allowing it to just get into the window.
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