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Old 05-19-2017, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,251 posts, read 1,620,156 times
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Monthly Precipitation | Lincoln Weather and Climate | SNR | UNL

Nebraska is in the middle of America and supposedly the dust bowl was extremely dry. I look at the precip amounts and it didn't look to awful.

Monthly Precipitation | Lincoln Weather and Climate | SNR | UNL

UNL rainfall amounts:

1930 24"
1931 34"
1932 26"
1933 26"
1934 17"
1935: 26"
1936: 14"
1937: 19"
1938: 28"

Every year had a month with-in that year that had at least 3.38"

1934 is commonly said to be the worst dust bowl year but that year there is 17" of rain in Nebraska.

Amounts tend to be greater on the southern plains.

1933 and 1935 were just below average and the only really dry years were 1934 and 1936.

I just looked at Tulsa, Oklahoma and it didn't look dry at all....

Tulsa Ranked Annual Rainfall

1930: 37"
1931: 39"
1932: 32"
1933: 36"
1934: 33"
1935: 40"
1936: 33"
1937: 38"

Oklahoma supposedly had a big migration to California but yet during the dust bowl years of the 30s the rainfall ranged from 32"-40" yearly. 1934 which was supposedly the year that everything dried out had 33" of precip.
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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I think it had more to do with poor farming practices and the wind blowing away all the top soil, plants need good stable soil just as much as they need water.
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Old 05-19-2017, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
2,199 posts, read 913,068 times
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Amarillo, TX averages 20.34" for then 1981-2010 period. From 1930-1939, it averaged 17.50" or about 86% of normal. The driest year in that period was 1933 with 12.22" or 60% of normal. 1933 was the 6th driest year on record, 1934 was the 9th, and 1935 was 22nd.

Dodge City, KS averaged 21.60" for the 1981-2010 period. From 1930-1939 it averaged 15.71" or only 73% of normal. The driest year in that period was 1934 with 11.50" or 53% of normal. 1934 was the 7th driest year on record, 1937 was 13th, 1939 was 16th and 1936 was 21st.

Pueblo, CO averaged 12.54" for the 1981-2010 period. From 1930-1939, it averaged 10.23" or about 82% of normal. The driest year in that period was 1934 with 5.78" or just 46% of normal. 1934 was the 3rd driest year on record, 1937 was the 11th, and 1935 was the 14th.

North Platte, NE averaged 20.19" for the 1981-2010 period. From 1930-1939, it averaged 15.98" or 79% of normal. The driest year in that period was 1931 with 10.01" or just 49% of normal. 1931 was the driest year on record, 1936 was the 8th, 1939 was the 12th, 1937 was the 15th, and 1934 was then 21st.

To put that into perspective, Rochester's driest year (1887) with 20.30" had 59% of normal. Many of these places had a driest year with 10% less than that. The 1960s, our driest period (with 4 straight top 12 driest years) had an average of 27.55" or 80% of normal. The dust bowl area was around that, give or take a few percent. In terms of near record years, the 1960s had 4 top 12 here, no dust bowl area had more than 3. Nothing special there.

I would say that the dust bowl was very dry for those areas, but nothing unusual compared to other periods of drought throughout the country.
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Old 05-20-2017, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
69,005 posts, read 51,154,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Monthly Precipitation | Lincoln Weather and Climate | SNR | UNL

Nebraska is in the middle of America and supposedly the dust bowl was extremely dry. I look at the precip amounts and it didn't look to awful.

Monthly Precipitation | Lincoln Weather and Climate | SNR | UNL

UNL rainfall amounts:

1930 24"
1931 34"
1932 26"
1933 26"
1934 17"
1935: 26"
1936: 14"
1937: 19"
1938: 28"

Every year had a month with-in that year that had at least 3.38"

1934 is commonly said to be the worst dust bowl year but that year there is 17" of rain in Nebraska.

Amounts tend to be greater on the southern plains.

1933 and 1935 were just below average and the only really dry years were 1934 and 1936.
.
Hmmm, were you expecting 0" of rain?


Also, Do you realize that all those years you listed were below normal except 1931?
Normal Annual precip for Lincoln is 29". So practically an entire decade below normal.


Have you considered eliminating winter precip in your findings?


How about the farming suburbs instead of the airport? Precip can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. Airport might of had 2" but the farms only 1"




And what does 1 month out of the year of having 3.38"+ have to do with other months that had extremely little? June is their wettest month and in 1936 they only had 1.13".


1934 & 1936 was the worst for them getting only half their normal precip.


Also don't forget the heat, evaporating things easily. Getting 2-3" of rain in a month during a drought is nothing.


Lastly... With all that said, you chose an area "outside" the most intense dust bowl severity.


Panhandle of TX, OK, and Western Kansas got it the worst.


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Old 05-20-2017, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Here is Lincoln, Nebraskas driest Summer on record. Only 2.36" fell in 1936. Normal is 11.24".Almost 9 inches below normal that summer.




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Old 05-20-2017, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Lastly, "Dust Bowl" doesn't mean every single month, every single year.


So for Nebraska, I would assume they had more dust storms in 1934, 1936, & 1937 then the other years in that decade. Other areas like Texas may of had it in different years.


Weather patterns and climate always change from time to time so one area may get an extreme while another area will get it another year.
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:53 AM
 
773 posts, read 508,466 times
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I think that there was a direct connection between the US government's push to get grain farmers to buy gasoline or diesel powered tractors, to be able to work more acreage, and the resultant dry soil conditions.


link to US Government aid program to support tractor buyers.


https://www.agclassroom.org/gan/timeline/1930.htm


xxx.
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Old 05-20-2017, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Part time dual resident of 76131 and 46060
2,698 posts, read 1,866,756 times
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Although I can't say this about the 2010's Decade as a whole just yet, what I can say is that Nebraska's Driest and Hottest year on modern record actually occurred in 2012, during the great heatwave and drought that gripped a considerable percentage of the lower 48 States, especially during the summer of 2012. There are some scientists who actually think that drought coverage, duration,and severity, and perhaps even an increase in frequency as well might occur in a warmer climate.... at least in the lower 48 states of the U.S.
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
6,107 posts, read 2,816,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Although I can't say this about the 2010's Decade as a whole just yet, what I can say is that Nebraska's Driest and Hottest year on modern record actually occurred in 2012, during the great heatwave and drought that gripped a considerable percentage of the lower 48 States, especially during the summer of 2012. There are some scientists who actually think that drought coverage, duration,and severity, and perhaps even an increase in frequency as well might occur in a warmer climate.... at least in the lower 48 states of the U.S.
Well, really the Midwest. Eastern states projected to get wetter. Though more extreme events in rainfall.
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Old 05-21-2017, 02:29 AM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 8,266,302 times
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The Dust Bowl wasn't just about drought, but also extreme heat. The summers of the 1930s were famously hot, and certain winters were famously cold as well. That can't be a good combination for farming.
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