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Old 12-05-2018, 05:52 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,034 posts, read 17,323,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speagles84 View Post
Haha we will see. I have the advantage of consistent lake effect from late October through January, but then again you get big totals from noreasters. I'm just hoping for another good season of at least my average of 50". 80" two years in a row isjust unlikely to happen lol.
Lake-effect snow doesn't affect Pittsburgh nearly as much as areas along and north of I-80. South of I-80, the lake-effect snow bands begin to decay, so whatever makes it to Pittsburgh normally leaves 1" or less on the ground. Alberta clippers are the most common type of winter storm to leave appreciable snowfall in Pittsburgh. They typically leave a quick 2" to 4" on the ground and then move out in a hurry. Nor'easters are less common, but they leave the most snow, usually 6" to 8" with an indirect hit, or 12"+ with a direct hit. Ironically, given the differences in their paths, "Miller A" nor'easters tend to leave more snow in Pittsburgh than "Miller B" nor'easters do, for three reasons:


1. Pittsburgh sometimes gets dry-slotted or experiences a brief changeover to rain or sleet during a Miller B nor'easter, whereas it never gets dry-slotted during a Miller A nor'easter and remains firmly in the cold sector.

2. Miller A nor'easters tend to be much larger and more intense than Miller B nor'easters, and they draw moisture from the Gulf Stream for their entire duration, so inland locations can still receive significant snowfall.

3. The transfer of energy from the interior to the ocean during a Miller B nor'easter often occurs by the time the interior disturbance reaches the Pittsburgh area, leaving it with less snow than areas to the east and west.


The nor'easters of February 2003 and February 2010 (first one) were anomalies for Pittsburgh. They were true Miller B nor'easters that left 12"+ of snow, because they both passed just far enough south to keep Pittsburgh firmly in the cold sector, and the interior disturbances didn't lose their energy by the time they arrived. Most other major snow events (12"+) in Pittsburgh history have come from Miller A nor'easters.
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Old 12-05-2018, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,569 posts, read 3,370,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Lake-effect snow doesn't affect Pittsburgh nearly as much as areas along and north of I-80. South of I-80, the lake-effect snow bands begin to decay, so whatever makes it to Pittsburgh normally leaves 1" or less on the ground. Alberta clippers are the most common type of winter storm to leave appreciable snowfall in Pittsburgh. They typically leave a quick 2" to 4" on the ground and then move out in a hurry. Nor'easters are less common, but they leave the most snow, usually 6" to 8" with an indirect hit, or 12"+ with a direct hit. Ironically, given the differences in their paths, "Miller A" nor'easters tend to leave more snow in Pittsburgh than "Miller B" nor'easters do, for three reasons:


1. Pittsburgh sometimes gets dry-slotted or experiences a brief changeover to rain or sleet during a Miller B nor'easter, whereas it never gets dry-slotted during a Miller A nor'easter and remains firmly in the cold sector.

2. Miller A nor'easters tend to be much larger and more intense than Miller B nor'easters, and they draw moisture from the Gulf Stream for their entire duration, so inland locations can still receive significant snowfall.

3. The transfer of energy from the interior to the ocean during a Miller B nor'easter often occurs by the time the interior disturbance reaches the Pittsburgh area, leaving it with less snow than areas to the east and west.


The nor'easters of February 2003 and February 2010 (first one) were anomalies for Pittsburgh. They were true Miller B nor'easters that left 12"+ of snow, because they both passed just far enough south to keep Pittsburgh firmly in the cold sector, and the interior disturbances didn't lose their energy by the time they arrived. Most other major snow events (12"+) in Pittsburgh history have come from Miller A nor'easters.

All very true. I am north of Pittsburgh though, halfway to 422, so I definitely get hit much more than the southern and western suburbs. Key for me is, I'm much higher in elevation than the majority of the region which helps for sure on close events to change from rain to sleet to snow.
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Old 12-05-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,569 posts, read 3,370,230 times
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Plum, PA 2018/2019 As of 12/5/2018 2 pm

2.2" today, surprise event.

October: 0.2"
November: 7.8"
December: 2.2"
January: -
February: -
March: -
April: -
May: -

Season: - 10.2"
Snow depth: - 2.0"
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Old 12-07-2018, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,569 posts, read 3,370,230 times
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Plum, PA 2018/2019 As of 12/7/2018 6 am

1.5" last night with the little clipper that moved through

October: 0.2"
November: 7.8"
December: 3.7"
January: -
February: -
March: -
April: -
May: -

Season: - 11.7"
Snow depth: - 3.0"
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,170 posts, read 48,339,039 times
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My Backyard: Had a quick coating yesterday evening thanks to a cold front and vort max overhead.

Every penny counts!

October: 0.0"
November: 6.0"
December: 0.1"

Season: 6.1"
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speagles84 View Post
Plum, PA 2018/2019 As of 12/7/2018 6 am

1.5" last night with the little clipper that moved through

October: 0.2"
November: 7.8"
December: 3.7"
January: -
February: -
March: -
April: -
May: -

Season: - 11.7"
Snow depth: - 3.0"
Are you getting tired of measuring yet? Seems like you've had a quite a few days there already..

I only had 2 days with measurable snow.
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Are you getting tired of measuring yet? Seems like you've had a quite a few days there already..

I only had 2 days with measurable snow.
Nah, I love when it snows haha. Think I'm up to 15 days with measurable snow now

You have to move closer to the great lakes! The consistent snow showers in the winter make the scenery pretty consistently white!
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,170 posts, read 48,339,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
The nor'easters of February 2003 and February 2010 (first one) were anomalies for Pittsburgh. They were true Miller B nor'easters that left 12"+ of snow, because they both passed just far enough south to keep Pittsburgh firmly in the cold sector, and the interior disturbances didn't lose their energy by the time they arrived. Most other major snow events (12"+) in Pittsburgh history have come from Miller A nor'easters.
February 2003 was memorable one for me. Almost 2 feet of snow. It was nuts.


NCDC ranks it as the 5th worst snowstorm.


https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-i...istoric-storms
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/rsi/nesis





Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
The nor'easters of February 2003 and February 2010 (first one) were anomalies for Pittsburgh. They were true Miller B nor'easters that left 12"+ of snow, because they both passed just far enough south to keep Pittsburgh firmly in the cold sector, and the interior disturbances didn't lose their energy by the time they arrived. Most other major snow events (12"+) in Pittsburgh history have come from Miller A nor'easters.
I love Miller A's because as you said we stay in the cold sector here without a strong surge of southern warmth but I think our biggest snows here come from Miller B's. Although its more fun seeing a Clipper Blow up into a coastal off the coast as the 2 Jets merge. Just need that to happen over the Mid Atlantic, not north of Philly.



For those unaware of the Miller storm tracks...

https://www.weatherworksinc.com/Miller-A-vs-Miller-B

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Old 12-07-2018, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,569 posts, read 3,370,230 times
Reputation: 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
February 2003 was memorable one for me. Almost 2 feet of snow. It was nuts.


NCDC ranks it as the 5th worst snowstorm.


https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-i...istoric-storms
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/rsi/nesis





I love Miller A's because as you said we stay in the cold sector here without a strong surge of southern warmth but I think our biggest snows here come from Miller B's. Although its more fun seeing a Clipper Blow up into a coastal off the coast as the 2 Jets merge. Just need that to happen over the Mid Atlantic, not north of Philly.



For those unaware of the Miller storm tracks...

https://www.weatherworksinc.com/Miller-A-vs-Miller-B

Ah Presidents day storm 2003... I was skiing at 7 Springs in the Laurel Highlands... 35" of snow, one of the best skiing weekends of my life
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Old 12-10-2018, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,170 posts, read 48,339,039 times
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Snow Totals so far this season:


Greensboro, North Carolina has more snow than Billings Montana and Anchorage Alaska and Fargo North Dakota.

Incredible year and not even astronomical winter yet. Insane.

Source:
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