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Old 01-05-2019, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Seattle Area
479 posts, read 65,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lommaren View Post
Define "many". In a general context, it is very rare after all. "Unique" doesn't necessarily mean "world exclusively" That being said, if global warming continues, Imeni Poliny will probably get above freezing in January in the near future, since it's quite dependent on the freeze of Okhotsk Bay. The fact that it can always remain above freezing in spite of being not so far inland from an ocean on its latitude, but still remain humid continental is what's really impressive about it.
Large parts of east Asia are non-subarctic and have never reached above freezing in January. Ulaanbaatar is only an example.

Heihe has a record high of -0.5 C in January and it's not only non-subarctic, but it has 5 months with means above 11 C

Ulaangom has a record high of -12.0 C (!) in January and has 5 months with means at 10 C or warmer.

Not being subarctic and never recording temperatures above freezing in January isn't so rare. East Asia is relatively stable and very continental so there are many places in east Asia that do have these properties.
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
5,526 posts, read 1,928,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QIDb602 View Post
Large parts of east Asia are non-subarctic and have never reached above freezing in January. Ulaanbaatar is only an example.

Heihe has a record high of -0.5 C in January and it's not only non-subarctic, but it has 5 months with means above 11 C

Ulaangom has a record high of -12.0 C (!) in January and has 5 months with means at 10 C or warmer.
What I mainly meant was climates with significative precipitation (hence not actual or de-facto semi-arid climates such as Mongolian climates or Kyzyl in Russia). Still Ulaangom makes me speechless. I'd never heard of that climate. Dammit I thought that was fake at first until I saw the weatherbox. That's one of the most insane climates on Earth. It being semi-arid rather than humid continental ensures that even possible.

Somewhat above average right now, I'll keep it in mind for this thread:

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Old 01-05-2019, 07:05 PM
 
Location: NYC
3,741 posts, read 1,501,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lommaren View Post
By the Oymyakon standard of coldest temp ever it is still Fort Yukon either way one slices it though. Old Crow is gone, but Fort Yukon stands.

Actually, Fort Yukon is not the only inhabited settlement in NA to have reached -61C. Such a record also occurred in Alberta's Fort Vermillion: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Vermilion


The funny thing is that it is a Dfb climate (humid continental), not Dfc or Dfd.



Quote:
Still, evidently Gjoa Haven looks to be the real deal as far as settlements go.
The towns that I listed are just the largest settlements, with over 1000+ people. There are still many, many others (smaller ones) in those Archipelagos which could have colder temps. It's difficult to say with complete certainty.



Quote:
It is still clear however, if we're talking the full North American pole of cold as far as averages go that the central Greenland highlands are the coldest.....


Wikipedia calls -38/-46 for Summit Camp, so I guess that's where the real pole of cold for North America would be when counting archipelagoes.
I agree with this part. Summit Camp and its sisters are difficult to beat: even in Antarctica you have to go well inland before you find colder climates.


http://www.summitcamp.org/status/wea...?period=1month
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
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Fort Vermilion is one strange climate. It's actually at 1/3 lower latitude within the 58N range than I'm at in Nykping and still it recorded such a temperature 34C below the average low at such a low latitude. Keep in mind that there's still about seven hours of daylight here this time of the year and only the Rockies properly shields it from some maritime influence. Then the front-load of spring is another thing, being enough far away from Hudson Bay to warm up early enough. Then, the 11C chinook record high for January too.

Its forecast doesn't look that interesting by its standards though, this could easily have been a forecast in the interior of Arctic Scandinavia.




Still, it's a great find
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,804 posts, read 963,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalop View Post
^There are a bunch of towns in Arctic Nunavut with 1000+ people that have colder averages than Old Crow: take Cambridge Bay, Taloyoak, Pond Inlet, Gjoa Haven, or even places as far south as Baker Lake and Rankin Inlet.


In comparison, Old Crow is warmer, has shorter winters, and has barely 200 people. It apparently gets slightly colder extremes, but that's about it. Not even remotely a candidate for NA Pole of Cold.
I said "candidate" because it depends how you define Pole of Cold. Certainly the extremes in northern Yukon and Alaska cannot be matched elsewhere in North America--not even in Eureka.

Old Crow's record minimum is 6C colder than Cambridge Bay's, 9C colder than Taloyoak, 5C colder than Pond Inlet, 9C colder than Gjoa Haven, and 9C colder than Baker Lake. It's even 4C colder than Eureka and, in fact, 1.6C colder than any temperature ever recorded anywhere in Nunavut. Those are not just "slightly" colder extremes.
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:23 PM
 
Location: NYC
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^I agree with that, but you initially responded to lommaren's original post saying Old Crow was colder than Fort Yukon on the basis of averages, not extremes:


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
Interesting thread.

I'd say Old Crow, Yukon, is a candidate for the NA Pole of Cold as far as settlements are concerned. Its averages are even a little bit colder than Fort Yukon.

__________________


Undoubtedly, though, if you ask a guy to spend a year in Old Crow and a year in Cambridge Bay, then ask him the open-ended question of which one is colder, you damn well know what his answer is going to be.
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,804 posts, read 963,842 times
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Yes, I kind of messed that part up.
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Old 01-06-2019, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Bidford-on-Avon, England
1,341 posts, read 143,521 times
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Yakutsk forecast
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Old 01-06-2019, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
5,526 posts, read 1,928,572 times
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With its cold winters averaging about -15C in mean temperatures, I'd definitely say Winnipeg qualifies under the "Siberian-like" category. Very stark difference between southerly and northerly wind pattern in this forecast to say the least.




I wouldn't really consider climates with winters milder than -10C as "Siberian-like" though if we're talking mid-latitudes. So, therefore Minneapolis is not cold enough for example.


Speaking of mid-latitudes, the Siberian Maritimes are kind of special to say the least:


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Old 01-06-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
570 posts, read 431,021 times
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This climate is much colder than Ulaangom in Mongolia. -40 would be normal there and the growing season is very short. It's another place to look at. Last 30 days weather. ...... Wiki page



So is Mohe, the coldest city in China. No extreme weather yet, but -35c is common at night. Last 30 days weather.


Delyankir is possibly colder than Oymyakon or Verkhoyansk. More nights below -50C this winter so far.
Delyankir past 30 days weather...Oymyakon past 30 days weather


Dzlandia is at 70N in Sakha republic. January 2018 data

Toko is only 56N, not as cold as the coldest places, but it can still get extremely cold at night. January 2018.


Ogimet has a page to find the coldest, warmest, and wettest places in the world or country. https://www.ogimet.com/ranking.phtml.en. The current leader is Marble Bar, Australia at +45.0C and Agayakan, Russia at -52.9C. It only has stations with a WMO number. One big exception in summer is Death Valley.
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