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Old 09-14-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,092 posts, read 2,333,073 times
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I could be wrong, but I think the reason western Europe doesn't have a csb climate is because of the gulf stream, in north America the Mediterranean influences go much further north, probably because of the cooler ocean temperatures but honestly I'm not exactly sure. However once you get up to Norway a some what dry/wet season develops similar to SE Alaska, though it's still too wet in the summer to classify it as "s".

City, Country | Driest Month | Wettest Month | Total
Bergen, Norway | 4.39 in | 11.66 in | 92.43 in
Sitka, Alaska | 2.88 in | 13.16 in | 86.66 in

I know that there is also a drying trend in Western Europe, but it's not as stark as in the PNW.

City, Country | Driest Month | Wettest Month | Total
Nantes, France | 1.71 in | 3.81 in | 32.26 in
Seattle, Washington | 0.70 in | 6.57 in | 37.49 in
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Old 09-14-2019, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Pacific Palisades, CA
107 posts, read 43,765 times
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Absolutely Costa Rica does not have Med climate, it is super tropical there, both Pacific and Atlantic coasts.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleSec View Post
Absolutely Costa Rica does not have Med climate, it is super tropical there, both Pacific and Atlantic coasts.
But it is still so pleasant on the Pacific Coast. It felt like Southern California both times I was there. It never rained that much. Just some spot drizzles.
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Pacific Palisades, CA
107 posts, read 43,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
But it is still so pleasant on the Pacific Coast. It felt like Southern California both times I was there. It never rained that much. Just some spot drizzles.
Idk man, I lived in Panama for 20 years (on the Pacific coast) and never, ever felt like Southern California (I've been in SoCal for 20 years). It was always super humid and hot.
CR and Panama have practically the same weather.
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:20 AM
 
Location: The South
140 posts, read 26,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
There is a map on wikipedia which shows all med climates in the world:
Holy moly what have they done to Eastern Spain and the Balearic Islands? SE Spain is BSh/BSk but most of the eastern part is definetly Mediterranean!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
How come France's Biscayne Coast line not included. What makes it different than Spain? And what do you call the eastern shore of Spain?
SW France is Oceanic though, it receives enough rain to be inside the Cfb threshold. Make it a bit warmer and it will be borderline Cfa within some years.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:27 PM
 
6,553 posts, read 6,576,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleSec View Post
Idk man, I lived in Panama for 20 years (on the Pacific coast) and never, ever felt like Southern California (I've been in SoCal for 20 years). It was always super humid and hot.
CR and Panama have practically the same weather.
Even on the Pacific coast? I have not been to the Atlantic coast. Am told cities like Limon is hot and humid. San Jose metro, which is capital and most populous region is in the middle. It is up in the highland though and can get quite cold. It creates a barrier between Pacific and Atlantic coasts.
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Old Yesterday, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
742 posts, read 698,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Even on the Pacific coast? I have not been to the Atlantic coast. Am told cities like Limon is hot and humid. San Jose metro, which is capital and most populous region is in the middle. It is up in the highland though and can get quite cold. It creates a barrier between Pacific and Atlantic coasts.
Feeling ‘similar’ doesn’t mean the climate is overall similar. San Jose is cooler (still warm) than the coasts due to its higher altitude. Yet as it happens in deep tropical areas, there aren’t seasons differentiated by temperature. Temperature is about the same throughout the year. This is a distinct feature that separate them from non-tropical climates.
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Old Yesterday, 09:28 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
11,350 posts, read 7,680,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I could be wrong, but I think the reason western Europe doesn't have a csb climate is because of the gulf stream, in north America the Mediterranean influences go much further north, probably because of the cooler ocean temperatures but honestly I'm not exactly sure. However once you get up to Norway a some what dry/wet season develops similar to SE Alaska, though it's still too wet in the summer to classify it as "s".

I know that there is also a drying trend in Western Europe, but it's not as stark as in the PNW.

City, Country | Driest Month | Wettest Month | Total
Nantes, France | 1.71 in | 3.81 in | 32.26 in
Seattle, Washington | 0.70 in | 6.57 in | 37.49 in
Portsmouth, UK | 1.1 in | 3.2 in | 25.5 in
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Old Yesterday, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
6,433 posts, read 3,682,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I could be wrong, but I think the reason western Europe doesn't have a csb climate is because of the gulf stream, in north America the Mediterranean influences go much further north, probably because of the cooler ocean temperatures but honestly I'm not exactly sure. However once you get up to Norway a some what dry/wet season develops similar to SE Alaska, though it's still too wet in the summer to classify it as "s".

City, Country | Driest Month | Wettest Month | Total
Bergen, Norway | 4.39 in | 11.66 in | 92.43 in
Sitka, Alaska | 2.88 in | 13.16 in | 86.66 in

I know that there is also a drying trend in Western Europe, but it's not as stark as in the PNW.

City, Country | Driest Month | Wettest Month | Total
Nantes, France | 1.71 in | 3.81 in | 32.26 in
Seattle, Washington | 0.70 in | 6.57 in | 37.49 in

yeah, there is no cold current in western europe at that latitude, so the summers in the south tend to be on the warmer side. And the south west coast is closer to Cfa than to Csb because it always gets somme summer rain. I mean cool and dry conditions are pretty unusual conditions in France in the summer, because cooler conditions in that season usually mean more rain, so it's either Cfb or Cfa / Csa depending on the summers.
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Old Yesterday, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,092 posts, read 2,333,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
But it is still so pleasant on the Pacific Coast. It felt like Southern California both times I was there. It never rained that much. Just some spot drizzles.
I don't know which town you visited, but here is a climate chart for Punta Arenas now compare that with say Long Beach, CA, you will see they are very different climates, sure they might feel the same during certain parts of the year, but when you look over the whole year very different. It would be like saying that Chicago and New Orleans both have the same climate because they are both hot and muggy during the summer.


Also one thing to consider that the "winter" (when the sun is at the lowest angle) of Punta Arenas is actually the dry season so completely opposite of the Mediterranean climates and if anything has more incomon with Cwa climates of southern China and northern India which have winter dry seasons. That being said Punta Arenas is still way too warm to be considered subtropical with it's coldest monthly mean being 27.1C (80.8F) in December, the temperatures would have to drop below 18 °C (64 °F) for it to be considered subtropical/mediterranean.
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