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Old Today, 12:40 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
804 posts, read 174,900 times
Reputation: 297

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I think the sample size might be too low, causing some random variation in some less populated areas. Here are NOAA's stats for fatalities by weather cause: https://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/hazstats...fatalities.pdf

Note that those are numbers on an average year (and in 2018) for the entire US. One small region that doesn't have a lot of people would have fairly few fatalities and therefore may be skewed by random error.

If you total the 10-year average numbers, you get 492 fatalities from all causes. If you assume the same across the other 10 years as well, that would be 9840 fatalities in total in the entire US across all 20 years. Seems like there are quite a lot of regions, so not much sample size except for the highly populated regions.

I still like the idea though.

Last edited by QIDb602; Today at 12:52 AM..
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Old Today, 02:05 AM
 
806 posts, read 241,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Rip currents aren't weather, though.
You hit on a good point - while interesting, I think that this map needs to come with some kind of explanation or summary of premises attached. For instance, "Cold" - is this just people who get lost and die of exposure in a blizzard? Or does it include someone who decides to go out and shovel their driveway after a big meal, and their heart explodes, even though they were "walking time bombs" to begin with? That hardly seems fair, although if there wouldn't have been snow on the ground, they probably would have lived longer than they did. Are suicides, who go off a boat with a cinder block tied around their neck, still considered a "drowning"?

For "Heat", wasn't it literally "hundreds" who died in Chicago during the heat wave of 1995? Old people who didn't have air conditioning, and stayed in their apartments, and proverbially "cooked" like the frog-in-the-pot parable (I think it was thousands of people in France in the same year). And it can get trickier - aren't deaths from wildfires primarily due to the heat and drought (and maybe lightening) that caused the fires to begin with? Average annual deaths for each cause in each state would also go a long way toward providing some scale.

To Salbot's point, The Weather Channel has taken under its umbrella, in addition to purely meteorological events, geological ones as well (earthquakes, tsunamis, rip currents, volcanoes, meteors, etc.). And by that definition, "drowning" should be #1 for Louisiana (from Katrina alone), shouldn't it? If this map were worldwide, I would think that "drought" would he a huge killer, due to loss of crops and starvation. Same way with a typhoon - if you are in Bangladesh, you may survive the typhoon, but then your odds of dying from disease or starvation go way up. So what was it that killed you, when the typhoon was at the root of it?

How does the World Health Organization count weather related deaths? I would think the OP would want to remain consistent with them or a similar organization, for clarity's sake. I'm going to go back and take a better look at their page, maybe they cover some of this.
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Old Today, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,536 posts, read 2,665,394 times
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There's A LOT of very flat country in "avalanche" territory.
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Old Today, 01:06 PM
 
Location: equator
3,855 posts, read 1,684,021 times
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That is fascinating. Thanks for posting. Alaska is "avalanche" more than just COLD? Hmmm.
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Old Today, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,910 posts, read 9,636,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
That is fascinating. Thanks for posting. Alaska is "avalanche" more than just COLD? Hmmm.
One avalanche can kill a whole lot of people in a short period of time, especially if it lands on a town.
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Old Today, 04:35 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,968 posts, read 5,133,249 times
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Interestingly enough the #1 cause of death in weather related fatalities in Florida isn't hurricanes. I remember years ago a trivia question that stated heat was the #1 cause of death in weather related incidences. Years ago hundreds died in Chicago from the heat wave they had.
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Old Today, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
2,979 posts, read 1,344,770 times
Reputation: 6798
Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Rip currents make sense in coastal areas but in NE Indiana and NW Ohio?
Rip currents are a fairly common occurrence on Lake Erie & Lake Michigan when it gets windy out. Even if the winds are not that high, rip currents can form around structures (structural currents) in any of the Great Lakes. Longshore currents can occur in Lake Michigan periodically.

Swimmers can be caught unaware by rip currents and around 40 some people a year drown in Lake Michigan. Around 30-35 people a year end up drowning in Lake Erie.

Storms tend to show up suddenly on the Great Lakes and currents come from multiple directions. I've been on a glassy Lake Ontario that turned into chaotic 5-10 foot waves within 15 minutes.

Most of the swimming beaches on the Lakes have flag systems that let people know when there is a higher risk of dangerous currents but not everyone pays attention to it. I've seen people casually go into the water on red flag days with sizeable waves.

I love the Great Lakes and have spent a lot of time around them but have a healthy respect for them.
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Old Today, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Norman, OK
2,612 posts, read 1,225,873 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
You hit on a good point - while interesting, I think that this map needs to come with some kind of explanation or summary of premises attached. For instance, "Cold" - is this just people who get lost and die of exposure in a blizzard? Or does it include someone who decides to go out and shovel their driveway after a big meal, and their heart explodes, even though they were "walking time bombs" to begin with? That hardly seems fair, although if there wouldn't have been snow on the ground, they probably would have lived longer than they did. Are suicides, who go off a boat with a cinder block tied around their neck, still considered a "drowning"?

For "Heat", wasn't it literally "hundreds" who died in Chicago during the heat wave of 1995? Old people who didn't have air conditioning, and stayed in their apartments, and proverbially "cooked" like the frog-in-the-pot parable (I think it was thousands of people in France in the same year). And it can get trickier - aren't deaths from wildfires primarily due to the heat and drought (and maybe lightening) that caused the fires to begin with? Average annual deaths for each cause in each state would also go a long way toward providing some scale.

To Salbot's point, The Weather Channel has taken under its umbrella, in addition to purely meteorological events, geological ones as well (earthquakes, tsunamis, rip currents, volcanoes, meteors, etc.). And by that definition, "drowning" should be #1 for Louisiana (from Katrina alone), shouldn't it? If this map were worldwide, I would think that "drought" would he a huge killer, due to loss of crops and starvation. Same way with a typhoon - if you are in Bangladesh, you may survive the typhoon, but then your odds of dying from disease or starvation go way up. So what was it that killed you, when the typhoon was at the root of it?

How does the World Health Organization count weather related deaths? I would think the OP would want to remain consistent with them or a similar organization, for clarity's sake. I'm going to go back and take a better look at their page, maybe they cover some of this.
It's worth mentioning that the map counts number of fatal events and not total number of fatalities. So a hurricane that kills 1000 people counts the same as one that kills 10 people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
There's A LOT of very flat country in "avalanche" territory.
The map is divided by the boundaries of the jurisdictions of the weather forecast offices. So the flat land in avalanche territory is because some of the region is prone to avalanches.
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Old Today, 05:34 PM
 
3,869 posts, read 2,294,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Very cool & interesting map!

Wind or heat?! I'm shocked!

And disappointed that I can no longer say "No one slipped and fell on sunshine!"
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