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Old 09-17-2019, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
210 posts, read 42,293 times
Reputation: 113

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
.68" here in northeast TN, so much drier than normal, but not to the point that the lawn needs to be watered. Have had some lightening and thunder and the scent of rain in the air, but the actual rain has disappointingly passed over this week.
Do you have a Bermuda Grass lawn? If so, that may be why.

There's so much of it here. As well as it tolerates our driest summers/autumns, I hate the fact that it not only goes dormant but even takes until mid- to late May to come back and goes dormant as soon as early October.

Same experience here about most rain just passing us by, but with thunder/lightning heard/visible. Quite disappointing. Also, it's unlikely to rain again at all until at least the 27th; we were supposed to get rain early next week, but that's still not soon enough, and now the chance is low enough (0-20% per day) to not be showing in the ten-day forecast. Even just 0.07in of rain this month until early next week was enough for Dad to call it "scary dry"; I cannot imagine what might happen to the plants if it doesn't rain until October.

This is how severe the effects on plants and wildlife are getting here (it's bad enough for me to begin genuinely worrying about my Needle Palms despite them being shaded, watered regularly and having been in the ground since this time of April):
Spoiler
As I said in the OP, my Virginian Juniper is drying out despite proper watering and high humidity.

Our pumpkin and watermelon crops, among others, were ruined by the near-total lack of water.

It hasn't happened to the majority yet, but many deciduous trees/shrubs have started changing their leaves despite it usually taking until late October/early November here, and a few have even gone fully dormant if not died.

When my plant watering jug began to leak, the localized water supply drew at least twenty snails and multiple ant colonies to the area, like desert nomads finding and settling in an oasis with a lake and fruit-bearing palms.

One of my friends said the Harpeth River (on the other side of Nashville compared to me, but still) was low enough for them to have to drag their canoe several times last weekend, which is surely no good for the fish in the river. I didn't pay attention to Indian Creek (Putnam County) and the Caney Fork River on my way to Nashville last Friday, but if I remember, I will this week and post an update on that.

We're starting to get even more stink bugs, brown recluses and gnats in the house than we possibly ever have. I can't be sure that this isn't because my parents have been too busy and grief-stricken to even think of exterminating lately, but the lack of water is most likely at least a major factor.

Despite them being deciduous (so able to shed their leaves in cold/dry conditions), mulched (so excess water isn't lost as quickly) and in the ground for as long as the palms, I've still had to resort to manually watering my blueberry bushes every few days.
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Old 09-18-2019, 04:59 AM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,898 posts, read 3,225,009 times
Reputation: 6798
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
My weather station has only recorded 0.07 inches of rain for this entire month so far, and even the last few days of August lacked rain too. I've also recorded 90F+ highs for most days this month, including a 99F high (even July is is only 90F+ on about half of days in July). In fact, six out of seven days the past week have been 95F+, and the seventh was still 93F. Yet, when I checked the news this evening, I saw NO COVERAGE about this bad drought!

Has anyone else been experiencing this? I know Carthage and some parts of Jackson County got a freak rainstorm last week, but that and the rain we were supposed to get the next day just barely dropped 0.07 inches on my backyard - COMBINED.

P.S.: It's so bad that even though I'm watering a full gallon daily and it's humid, my potted Virginian Juniper is still struggling to get by. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juniperus_virginiana

EDIT: These August/September droughts often make me wonder if Tennessee may be headed towards a future where the climate is Hot-summer Mediterranean instead of Humid subtropical, as common as they've been in recent years. If so, I also wonder how the native vegetation will be different.
Same in Virginia. We haven't had rain in months. I'm losing mature trees and established azaleas and dogwoods. The lawn has been toast for weeks. I now only water container plant and flowers outside.
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Old 09-18-2019, 06:08 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,899 posts, read 14,660,112 times
Reputation: 24621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
Do you have a Bermuda Grass lawn? If so, that may be why.

There's so much of it here. As well as it tolerates our driest summers/autumns, I hate the fact that it not only goes dormant but even takes until mid- to late May to come back and goes dormant as soon as early October.
Ok, 'lawn' might be ambitious, more of a 'yard' with whatever grows, including clover, violets, and other undesirables. But other than the spot where the lawn guy cuts too close, no browning. I'm not seeing any signs of stress on plants or trees in the area, though I have had to water my potted plants more than usual.
Here's a link to a quick snapshot I took last week. Poor quality picture but is shows lot's of growth, lot's of green in the field across the way.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...rated-deer.png
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Old 09-18-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,581 posts, read 18,312,073 times
Reputation: 28887
This year is reminding me of the 2016 fall. That late summer and fall were extremely dry, and that led to a series of wildfires that are extremely rare here.

Early and mid summer was pleasant, but it has been a real grind of hot and dry during August and September. It has pretty much been constant 90+, hot and dry all month.
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Old 09-18-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
210 posts, read 42,293 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
Same in Virginia. We haven't had rain in months. I'm losing mature trees and established azaleas and dogwoods. The lawn has been toast for weeks. I now only water container plant and flowers outside.
That's horrible! Much worse than here!

UPDATE: Forecast projects no rain on Friday Sept. 27 either.
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Old 09-18-2019, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
1,412 posts, read 637,483 times
Reputation: 2259
Most of the central portion of the country has had a wet year and is five or more inches above average in precipitation, yet they have received little to no rain in the last few weeks.

Does the drought monitor account for absolute dry periods of weather, or is it based entirely on yearly precipitation?
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Old 09-18-2019, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,979 posts, read 9,693,043 times
Reputation: 6332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soccernerd View Post
Most of the central portion of the country has had a wet year and is five or more inches above average in precipitation, yet they have received little to no rain in the last few weeks.

Does the drought monitor account for absolute dry periods of weather, or is it based entirely on yearly precipitation?
It's based on soil moisture.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
210 posts, read 42,293 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
It's based on soil moisture.
That must be why I've seen nothing in the news, then.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
732 posts, read 418,527 times
Reputation: 1242
Awful here in Alabama too.
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Old 09-19-2019, 05:25 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,899 posts, read 14,660,112 times
Reputation: 24621
I'm going to retract my earlier statement. I went into nearby town yesterday (35 minutes away and slightly lower elevation) and noticed a number of trees there do seem to be suffering, very dry and dead brown leaves. Funny how that slight change in location makes a difference.
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