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View Poll Results: Worst?
Nashville 0 0%
Yuma 0 0%
Miami 1 50.00%
Nuuk 1 50.00%
Yakutsk 0 0%
Voters: 2. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-17-2019, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
206 posts, read 40,681 times
Reputation: 108

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What makes these climates so bad for so many people? Check the spoilers to find out!

Yuma, AZ, U.S.A. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuma,_Arizona#Climate
Spoiler
The city of Yuma, Arizona has a yearly mean maximum of 116.2F, which is higher than any other major city in the U.S. Four months have 110F+ mean maxima, five have 105F+, seven 100F+ and eight 90F+. It is a dry heat, which would make it not feel as hot, but some people I've met complain about needing constant hydration and/or feeling like their airways are drying out.

Also, the average annual rainfall of 3.36 inches could lead to severe droughts and require you to be very selective about your plants, while the 68F average high of the coldest month certainly wouldn't give a dry-heat-hater time to recover from the horrible summer.


Miami, FL, U.S.A. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami#Climate
Spoiler
The average highs in the year range from 76.2F in January to 91.0F in August, with a relative humidity averaging 73.2%. This summer is a lot cooler than Yuma, but the excessive humidity would make it feel far worse for many people, and the winters, as with Yuma, would be insufficient for anyone unable to deal with the horrid summers to recover.

Also, much of the 61.90 inches of rain is concentrated into the dry-sun half of the year, with three such months averaging well over 8 inches of rain. Afternoon thunderstorms in the warm season, although brief, often bring torrential rainfall and may come with strong wind - not to mention the hurricanes the area is known for making the area extremely dangerous!


Nashville, TN, U.S.A. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashvi...nessee#Climate
Spoiler
As with Miami, it has a cooler summer than Yuma but is too humid to not be even worse. It cools down more than the other two, but the 46.9F average high in January combined with high humidity make it feel worse. Thus, the only months you can properly recover from the summer are March, April (for heat-lovers), October (for heat-lovers), November (for mild-weather-lovers) and February (only on some days mostly in late Feb.).

Also, it gets 47.25in rainfall annually on well over 100 days per year, and much of it is concentrated in the spring as well as November, ruining much of your chance to enjoy the pleasant conditions while they last. Although snow is brief, light and uncommon, it does fall once to a few times per year, and it's often VERY disruptive when it does due to insufficient driving experience and lots of ice forming around it. While the 37.7F January mean is warm enough to easily grow Needle Palms, Dwarf Palmettos and a wide variety of other broad-leaved evergreens, most people are either unaware of the palm-suitable climate or simply don't care, instead choosing to plant Crepemyrtle, cherry blossoms and Japanese Bananas that don't give you respite from the mostly-deciduous native vegetation that looks awful in November to March.

Although it lacks the hurricanes the mid-Atlantic and coastal South get, it still often gets afternoon thunderstorms from the Gulf of Mexico in the warm season. As in Miami, these are brief but often severe.


Yakutsk, Russia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakutsk#Climate
Spoiler
This climate is the exact opposite of Yuma, Miami or Nashville; instead of infamous summers, it has infamous winters, specifically the coldest outside limited portions of interior Antarctica. Norilsk has a colder annual average temperature and still deathly winters, but it's cooler summers and longer winters that bring it down as opposed to Antarctic-type cold.

The coldest month, January, sees a daily mean of -37.5F, average high of -32.3F and average low of -42.7F. It does have very warm summers, having an average high of 77.9F in July and three other months with an average high of at least 55F, but the July average could backfire on heat-haters that have desperately tried to adjust to the awful winter and not had any exposure to warmth; on the other hand, three- or four-month summers are rarely enough for a cold-hater to recover, and the winter deciduous scenery is far, far, FAR less avoidable than Nashville's and lasts over half the year.

As early as October and as late as April, losing your keys could be a life-or-death situation, and slipping/falling on ice could be a serious hazard even in those same months that are safe and pleasant almost everywhere else.


Nuuk, Greenland. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuuk#Climate
Spoiler
The winters in Nuuk are over 50F warmer than Yakutsk, but that means even the average highs are noticeably below freezing for months. Also, the July average high is 50.2F, which means NO warm weather to enjoy. As in Nashville, the humidity makes it feel worse than temperature alone would suggest, except that summer is the only season where even a dry cold could be manageable for someone like me.

As for winter scenery, there's no recovering from it. There's no trees whatsoever in Nuuk. With a July daily mean of 44.2F, the only woody plants that can grow are Downy Birch trees, Gray-Leaf Willow trees, Green Alder trees and Greenland Mountain Ash, but the only known part of Greenland where they're common and can become more than a wispy shrub is the Qinngua Valley.


Curious to see my preferences? Spoiler below! NOTE: Worst is first, best is last (unlike usual).
Spoiler
1st worst: Nuuk. The subfreezing winters and utter lack of a warm season are just horrendous. Plus, I could probably never get used to the long, dark winters and practical lack of trees.

2nd worst: Yakutsk. Again, the near-lack of winter sun and lengthy, subfreezing winters would most likely be impossible for me to adjust to. Unlike Nuuk, it does have trees and a warm season, but those trees are dormant most of the year with lack of diversity, and the warm season is WAY too short.

3rd worst/3rd most tolerable: Miami. The summer humidity here is as bad as Nashville if not worse, but it lasts even longer and doesn't give you enough time to recover. Also, the hurricanes would be too dangerous for me to ever consider moving to even the mid-Atlantic or NYC, let alone the coastal regions of the South. However, the lack of a cool season and ability to grow so many evergreen plants would be amazing.

2nd most tolerable: Nashville. Basically Miami summers with a cool season just a tad too cool. As someone who's grown up in this area, I can live with it... but barely. Anything too cold to grow Winter Pansies, Southern Magnolia and the hardiest palms wouldn't be manageable for me, as would a full three-month temperate winter or the deathly summers of DFW.

1st most tolerable: Yuma. For a cold-hating, evergreen-loving, humidity-hating, Sun-Belt-loving person like me, a climate like Yuma is about the closest to paradise things could get. The only things I'd have to adjust to are scant rainfall, scorpions, Gila Monsters and Africanized Bees, but the benefits would far outweigh them. While a climate like San Francisco or Auckland would be even more ideal, they're unsuitable for completely different reasons, and those climates are WAY too mild to be part of a "Which one has the worse climate?" debate.

Last edited by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M.; 09-18-2019 at 12:53 AM..
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Old 09-17-2019, 11:34 PM
 
Location: NW Indiana
5,504 posts, read 2,667,735 times
Reputation: 1268
From best to worst:

1: Nashville

2: Miami

3: Yakutsk

4: Yuma

5: Nuuk
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Old 09-17-2019, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
206 posts, read 40,681 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJ1013 View Post
From best to worst:

1: Nashville

2: Miami

3: Yakutsk

4: Yuma

5: Nuuk
I was tickled to notice the first poster has similar positions to me for all but one of those cities despite only placing one in the exact same spot. Lol. I almost laughed.
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Old 09-18-2019, 12:21 AM
tij
 
Location: Providence, RI
358 posts, read 78,627 times
Reputation: 182
Worst to best imo:

1. Yakutsk (extreme cold)
2. Nuuk (no warm season whatsoever, but survivable temps)
_____________ (big gap here)

3. Yuma (arid, hot, excessively sunny, and surprisingly muggy at times in summer)
4. Miami (too hot and humid)
5. Nashville (summers are a bit too hot and humid, winters are fairly nice but could use more snow)

Last edited by tij; 09-18-2019 at 01:08 AM.. Reason: clarified that yakutsk and nuuk are much, much worse than the others
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Old 09-18-2019, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
814 posts, read 179,024 times
Reputation: 297
worst to best:

1. Yakutsk

2. Nuuk

3. Yuma

4. Miami

5. Nashville
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Old 09-18-2019, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
206 posts, read 40,681 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by tij View Post
Worst to best imo:

1. Yakutsk (extreme cold)
2. Nuuk (no warm season whatsoever, but survivable temps)
_____________ (big gap here)

3. Yuma (arid, hot, excessively sunny, and surprisingly muggy at times in summer)
4. Miami (too hot and humid)
5. Nashville (summers are a bit too hot and humid, winters are fairly nice but could use more snow)
Lol, I love how you put "big gap here". I agree with your placement of said gap separating hot from cold, too
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Old 09-18-2019, 06:13 AM
Status: "I am now using wikis similar to Wikipedia" (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Will County, IL
11 posts, read 1,787 times
Reputation: 29
Yuma: F-

Way too hot in summer! And too sunny and dry

Nashville: B

Nashville, Too weak of a winter and little too hot summers

Nuuk: B

Decent but needs warmer summers and colder winters

Yakutsk: B

I don’t mind the extreme cold! Plus great summers too!

Yuma for sure! Because way too hot + Y is for Yucky!
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:37 AM
 
65 posts, read 5,805 times
Reputation: 43
From best to worst:-
1. Miami
2. Nashville
3. Yakutsk
4. Yuma
5. Nuuk
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Old 09-18-2019, 10:34 AM
 
Location: NYC
4,043 posts, read 1,722,185 times
Reputation: 1939
The worst are certainly Miami and Yuma. Tropical climates are the prototype of failure, and hot deserts are not too far behind.


Nashville is a mediocre climate; not an utter failure but not great either.





Nuuk is decent; it is better than mediocre but still quite far from excellence. Make it a bit colder in winter and then it'd be better.


Yakutsk has an excellent climate. It's one of the few places in the world with proper winters, and acceptable summers.

Last edited by Shalop; 09-18-2019 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 09-18-2019, 12:33 PM
Status: "I want to put my climates on Wikipedia again :(" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Wyoming unfortunately
35 posts, read 6,638 times
Reputation: 51
Best to worst:

1. Nuuk - Fantastic, never gets hit and winters aren’t even bad. I do wish it was wetter though.

2. Nashville - Okay but hot in summer, and winters could be cooler too.

3. Yakutsk - Ridiculously cold in winter, but I couple take it especially I’ve these next two hellholes.

4. Miami - Stupid heat and humidity that I couldn’t probably take well.

5. Yuma - This is almost a carbon copy of my nightmare climate. Hot, dry, sunny, no thanks.
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