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Old 09-27-2019, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
232 posts, read 47,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Green Stage: The beginning. Everything still looks like summer for the most part. There's still flowers, the grass and leaves are still green. Sunflowers are at their most abundant. There's a coming chill at night but the day is still warm, though not as frequently hot as in summer (in a normal year). The first signs of the leaves changing come, but it's spotty. This is generally the ideal time for most state/county fairs. Thunderstorms and rain showers are fairly common.
Late August to mid October. Leaves only change in this time period (except towards the end) due to drought if at all, it's consistently hot to late September and mainly hot for this whole period.

Quote:
Gold Stage: The peak. The most idyllic part. Shorter in some areas, longer in others. The fall weather has settled in. Temps most likely will be between low 40s to mid 60s. Less thunderstorms, some showers and gloomy days but a lot of dry, blue sky days. This is when the leaves are peaking. Red, yellow, gold, purple, orange, all the colours. Apples are ripe as are pumpkins. Mine (and most people's) favourite parts of fall. A lot of leaves everywhere. In colder climates, frost may start in this period. Snow flurries may fall but it's fleeting. In warmer, milder climates, frost is still a bit aways.
Late October to early November. Frosts are frequent but just beginning. Hard freezes are uncommon. However, this stage is warmer on average than you describe.

Quote:
Brown Stage: After the peak. The beginning of this stage will still have leaves but soon after it's just sticks. The grass, depending on climate and weather, will turn yellow or brown. It often gets greyer, damper, foggier. The rain is more drizzly. Snow flurries become an expected occurrence in colder areas. The first accumulating snow is likely to come here, but not last long. The phrase "winter is coming" comes to mind. For warmer climates, this is basically how winter is.
Mid November to mid February. This is followed by the return of Cherry Blossoms and Bradford Pears in late February. Pansies often still bloom in this time period, and quite a few other flowers can around the beginning and end of this period. We almost always get our snow within this period, with snowfall in March and April rare.

Quote:
and a fourth bonus stage: White Stage: Any part of meteorological fall when long lasting snowpack and consistent freezing temps has settled in. Many places don't have a "white stage" but colder climates do. However, if it's a warmer autumn, they may not have a "white stage" at all.
Never. We live in a subtropical climate. Our winters are too mild for even transient snow cover; we have snow cover no more than 10% of the time in winter. A few hardy palms can grow here with little trouble.

Quote:
What do you think of these classifications?
They're great! They're not perfect, but nothing is.
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Old 09-29-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
11,135 posts, read 5,210,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Wow, it was room temperature??? Holy moly, and before October I don't recall ever seeing temps in the 60s in Florida between June and September. I do think I remember seeing it in May before, which was a rare treat. (Though it was raining)
It doesn't happen often - I remember one "cold" front in September back around 2002. Apparently the hurricanes in the Atlantic pulled all of our moisture away so the humidity was gone. Unfortunately, September has been a much drier month than average which doesn't bode well for our "fire" season.
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Old 09-29-2019, 08:34 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,286 posts, read 18,237,187 times
Reputation: 14784
Stages of fall in the South...


Leftover summer (September 20-October 10): All plant and animal life is still thriving. The only obvious sign of fall is shorter days, but there are some subtle changes as well. The sultry humidity of summer goes away, and the diurnal temperature range increases. Nighttime low temperatures begin to decrease faster than daytime high temperatures, which can still get hot under high pressure. Average temperatures during this time are similar to the Northeast and Midwest during mid- to late August. Sweaters and light jackets come out for the first time in months, because average nighttime low temperatures fall into the 50s for the first time. Tropical disturbances are a wild card, and whatever rain does fall still comes mostly from thunderstorms, but the general trend during this time is sunnier and drier. The drier air brings with it less haze, which makes sunrises and sunsets sharper and more vivid, and cooler nights, which can feel deceivingly chilly with a slight breeze. Spiders seem to become more active during this time, spinning larger webs. Roadside stands fill up with fruits and vegetables from the recent harvest.

Green stage (October 10-30): This is when fall really begins in the South. Cold fronts finally become strong enough to push all the way to the Gulf of Mexico, but they often do so with little fanfare because the September heat has begun to transfer into the stratosphere, stabilizing the air. This stability results in sunny, dry weather, and October is the driest month of the year for much of the South. The weather pattern is quiet, and daytime high temperatures are pleasant, but gloves come out for the first time in months, because average nighttime low temperatures fall into the 40s for the first time. Cool nighttime air over the warm ground produces patchy fog. The first frost of the season normally occurs during this time. Indoors, neither the heater nor the air conditioner are needed much. Outdoors, the grass and bushes still grow, but the leaves begin to change, and the acorns begin to fall. Squirrels and chipmunks are busy hoarding during this time. Apples, cinnamon and pumpkins are the flavors of the season. The cool, dry, crisp nighttime air is perfect for bonfires and stargazing. During this time, it becomes obvious to everybody that it's not summer anymore.

Golden stage (October 30-November 20): The essence of fall peaks during this time, including peak foliage. Average daytime high temperatures fall into the 60s for the first time, which is cool enough for sweatshirts and jackets all day. The first freeze of the season normally occurs during this time, and warm beverages are now in season. The McRib is available for a limited time. Though there are still plenty of sunny and mild to warm days during this time, cloud cover and wind both begin to increase as the last trace of summer warmth dissipates from the stratosphere. A brief "second season" of severe weather is possible during this time, due to the cooling of the stratosphere and the influence of the Gulf of Mexico, but stratiform rain events become the main source of precipitation. Cold-air damming events become more likely on the Piedmont during this time. Halloween signifies the season of death, as the days become short, the nights long, and all of nature either dies or goes dormant. Most people cut their grass for the last time, as what few remaining traces of summer all disappear. Solar winter begins during this time.

Brown stage (November 20-December 10): Fall gives way to winter. Average daytime high and nighttime low temperatures fall into the 50s and 30s, respectively, and heavier coats come out for the first time in months. Cloudy days are as common as sunny days during this time, due to an increasingly stormy weather pattern. The only periods of mild to warm temperatures are in advance of approaching storm systems. Once a storm system passes, the days are cool and windy, and the nights are freezing cold. Cold-air damming events have the potential to produce wintry precipitation on the Piedmont. Even at midday, the angle of the sun is obviously lower, and shadows on the ground are longer. Outdoors, the ground is covered by dead leaves and tree debris, and grass and bushes go dormant. The cold nighttime air is punctuated by the smell of burning wood from a fireplace. Indoors, people keep warm by the fire, and with warm beverages. Thanksgiving is a time for good food, football and good times with family and loved ones, and anticipation for Christmas begins as winter settles in, and houses light up with Christmas lights.


Winter in the South is basically an extension of the "brown stage" of fall, and it tends to last until the first signs of spring, which appear sometime between late February and late March, depending on the prevailing weather pattern from year to year.
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Old 09-30-2019, 06:33 AM
 
Location: New York Area
16,760 posts, read 6,625,277 times
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A rare very early "white stage" in the New York City area, on October 29, 2011:





Effectively that was the beginning and end of winter, despite one transient snowfall around January 21, 2012.
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Old 09-30-2019, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
341 posts, read 262,035 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yes, but I lived in north Texas, which is more seasonal than most of the state. The pecans and catalpas turned yellow. The sweetgums turned red and orange. The red oaks were pretty, a dark red colour. The white oaks were dull. A boring brown.
I'll never forget this moment after I moved to Houston ... it was about the third week in October 12 years ago, so three weeks after I'd moved down from Columbus. One morning, I had occasion to turn around in my chair and look at the neighborhood across the street. Every tree I could see was still the deep green of summer, and I said to myself "wow, why haven't the leaves changed yet?" Well, because summer is longer there than up here. By mid-October, some trees already have lost their leaves and the ones that still have them are by and large changing colors.
It screwed with my mind and actually made me homesick for a few minutes.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Norman, OK
2,630 posts, read 1,238,189 times
Reputation: 769
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmave View Post
I'll never forget this moment after I moved to Houston ... it was about the third week in October 12 years ago, so three weeks after I'd moved down from Columbus. One morning, I had occasion to turn around in my chair and look at the neighborhood across the street. Every tree I could see was still the deep green of summer, and I said to myself "wow, why haven't the leaves changed yet?" Well, because summer is longer there than up here. By mid-October, some trees already have lost their leaves and the ones that still have them are by and large changing colors.
It screwed with my mind and actually made me homesick for a few minutes.
One time I went to Houston in mid-December, and it seemed like that was peak fall foliage season there.
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Old 09-30-2019, 05:32 PM
 
Location: The South
143 posts, read 27,541 times
Reputation: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenDiva123 View Post
I would view the autumn season a bit like that also. In central England, I would say it goes something like this:

Green Stage: Mid-Sep to around early Oct
The trees are mainly green with a few changes here and there, it's mild usually but can be chilly and wet at times (although it can be like that in July here tbh ) but there's still a chance for warm, sunny weather. Temps usually around 15 - 20C (59 - 68F). Nights can be chilly.

Gold Stage: Mid-Oct to early Nov
The trees are in the peak autumn colour (look best around Halloween i'd say). It's normally chilly and mostly cloudy by now. Frost may occur in colder autumns but not always, sometimes not until November. Warm, sunny days are unlikely by this stage. Temps around 10 to 15C (50 - 59F).

Brown Stage: around the 2nd week of Nov until early Dec
The trees lose their leaves gradually and the weather becomes duller, darker and colder. It rains a lot at this time of year and it's almost always chilly. Frost occurs some mornings and in some years you might get the occasional light snowfall. Temps around 7 - 13C (45 - 55F) normally but it can vary.

We do not have a White Stage here as the climate is oceanic and not as extreme as Minnesota. The winter is usually like late autumn but just colder with sporadic snowfalls. From Dec to Mar it's usually cold and wet, around 0 - 10C (32 - 50F) but it can occasionally be milder or colder.
I was in London once in late September and I remember that many trees had already "golden" leaves and London is warmer than Central England, isn't it?
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Old 09-30-2019, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
232 posts, read 47,353 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Stages of fall in the South...


Leftover summer (September 20-October 10): All plant and animal life is still thriving. The only obvious sign of fall is shorter days, but there are some subtle changes as well. The sultry humidity of summer goes away, and the diurnal temperature range increases. Nighttime low temperatures begin to decrease faster than daytime high temperatures, which can still get hot under high pressure. Average temperatures during this time are similar to the Northeast and Midwest during mid- to late August. Sweaters and light jackets come out for the first time in months, because average nighttime low temperatures fall into the 50s for the first time. Tropical disturbances are a wild card, and whatever rain does fall still comes mostly from thunderstorms, but the general trend during this time is sunnier and drier. The drier air brings with it less haze, which makes sunrises and sunsets sharper and more vivid, and cooler nights, which can feel deceivingly chilly with a slight breeze. Spiders seem to become more active during this time, spinning larger webs. Roadside stands fill up with fruits and vegetables from the recent harvest.

Green stage (October 10-30): This is when fall really begins in the South. Cold fronts finally become strong enough to push all the way to the Gulf of Mexico, but they often do so with little fanfare because the September heat has begun to transfer into the stratosphere, stabilizing the air. This stability results in sunny, dry weather, and October is the driest month of the year for much of the South. The weather pattern is quiet, and daytime high temperatures are pleasant, but gloves come out for the first time in months, because average nighttime low temperatures fall into the 40s for the first time. Cool nighttime air over the warm ground produces patchy fog. The first frost of the season normally occurs during this time. Indoors, neither the heater nor the air conditioner are needed much. Outdoors, the grass and bushes still grow, but the leaves begin to change, and the acorns begin to fall. Squirrels and chipmunks are busy hoarding during this time. Apples, cinnamon and pumpkins are the flavors of the season. The cool, dry, crisp nighttime air is perfect for bonfires and stargazing. During this time, it becomes obvious to everybody that it's not summer anymore.

Golden stage (October 30-November 20): The essence of fall peaks during this time, including peak foliage. Average daytime high temperatures fall into the 60s for the first time, which is cool enough for sweatshirts and jackets all day. The first freeze of the season normally occurs during this time, and warm beverages are now in season. The McRib is available for a limited time. Though there are still plenty of sunny and mild to warm days during this time, cloud cover and wind both begin to increase as the last trace of summer warmth dissipates from the stratosphere. A brief "second season" of severe weather is possible during this time, due to the cooling of the stratosphere and the influence of the Gulf of Mexico, but stratiform rain events become the main source of precipitation. Cold-air damming events become more likely on the Piedmont during this time. Halloween signifies the season of death, as the days become short, the nights long, and all of nature either dies or goes dormant. Most people cut their grass for the last time, as what few remaining traces of summer all disappear. Solar winter begins during this time.

Brown stage (November 20-December 10): Fall gives way to winter. Average daytime high and nighttime low temperatures fall into the 50s and 30s, respectively, and heavier coats come out for the first time in months. Cloudy days are as common as sunny days during this time, due to an increasingly stormy weather pattern. The only periods of mild to warm temperatures are in advance of approaching storm systems. Once a storm system passes, the days are cool and windy, and the nights are freezing cold. Cold-air damming events have the potential to produce wintry precipitation on the Piedmont. Even at midday, the angle of the sun is obviously lower, and shadows on the ground are longer. Outdoors, the ground is covered by dead leaves and tree debris, and grass and bushes go dormant. The cold nighttime air is punctuated by the smell of burning wood from a fireplace. Indoors, people keep warm by the fire, and with warm beverages. Thanksgiving is a time for good food, football and good times with family and loved ones, and anticipation for Christmas begins as winter settles in, and houses light up with Christmas lights.


Winter in the South is basically an extension of the "brown stage" of fall, and it tends to last until the first signs of spring, which appear sometime between late February and late March, depending on the prevailing weather pattern from year to year.
Same here. Only things I disagree on are Spring taking until late March to begin some years and needing a jacket/sweatshirt when it's in the 60s. I hardly ditch my summer clothes even in the mid and upper 50s, and all we need are several days straight of lower 60s+ highs (or a week of upper 50s+ without frost) with decent daylight to tempt those buttercups, hyacinths and tulips into bloom.

I do agree with the timing, however, as well as the fact that the South never gets a white stage even in mid-winter (see my post above).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taipan001 View Post
I was in London once in late September and I remember that many trees had already "golden" leaves and London is warmer than Central England, isn't it?
That's quite odd. I too thought London was warmer than central Europe. I'd consider it to be not only warm temperate but even almost subtropical (you can grow Oleander there, which even "upper" subtropical places like Nashville, DC and OKC can't).
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Old 10-01-2019, 09:14 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,286 posts, read 18,237,187 times
Reputation: 14784
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
Same here. Only things I disagree on are Spring taking until late March to begin some years and needing a jacket/sweatshirt when it's in the 60s. I hardly ditch my summer clothes even in the mid and upper 50s, and all we need are several days straight of lower 60s+ highs (or a week of upper 50s+ without frost) with decent daylight to tempt those buttercups, hyacinths and tulips into bloom.

I do agree with the timing, however, as well as the fact that the South never gets a white stage even in mid-winter (see my post above).
Here in Georgia, whenever we've had cold Marches, it has delayed the blooming of trees and flowers until late in the month, unless there was a torch in February that brought them out prematurely, in which case the bloom just stalls when the cold weather settles back in for a time. As for jackets, gloves and other cold weather gear, I'm talking about having to wear them at night to start with. There have been days with highs in the 70s that have required people to put on sweatshirts and jackets at night when the temperatures fall into the 50s. Besides, coming out of a long, hot summer, temperatures in the 50s and 60s can feel much chillier than they normally are.
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Old 10-01-2019, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
17,438 posts, read 14,127,805 times
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For here, there is a green stage at the start of autumn, when plants start to regrow after the summer dry.

Then a gold/red stage when the many deciduous tress start to change.

Some trees don't really change until well into winter, daffodils come come out in autumn, and native species and introduced species can flower once the temperature cools enough.
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