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View Poll Results: Of the three major definitions of a season, which do you consider to be "valid"?
Astronomical (Solar) 7 28.00%
Meteorological 15 60.00%
"Official" (invented by Romans, appears on calendars) 7 28.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-03-2019, 01:58 PM
 
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we base it on insects:
Spring starts with seeing the first butterfly.
Summer with one lightnin' bug (firefly).
Fall is yellow jacket season.
Winter is no mosquitoes.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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none of those. After the last couple decades I would say mid December to mid March.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Summer here in coastal GA is April to October. Fall is November and December. Winter is Jan and Feb. Spring is March.



But your winter is more like Philadelphia's early November around here with say 60F high and 40F low and some frosts and below 32F temps thrown in. I've been to Savannah in winter (beautiful) and there are plants flowering all over the place and lots of greenery.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
To me, my choice of activities is based on the weather. I internally "feel" that "summer" is however long the weather is more often than not in the 80's and above each week. Which, in NC, is 8 months out of the year.
Agreed.

We've been in "summer mode" since May. I've been swimming since May. September was the hottest September on record locally. Each day in October has been above 90. Tomorrow is going to be in the low 80s with Saturday in the 70s.

The 10-day forecast looks seasonable. Summer is probably "over" tomorrow.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: New York Area
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I'm in New York City area. Meteorologists generally consider fall to be September, October and November. Others use September 6 to December 5, the definition I prefer. That segments out as "summer" the warmest 91 or so days on a mean basis and winter as the coldest such days. New York City doesn't usually have a lasting snowpack. However, historically, deep, accumulating snows that linger for a week or two on the ground usually starts around December 6. In 2002 we had one such snow the day before. We have had substantial accumulating snows as early as October 29, 2011 and November 7, 2012, the so-called "son of Sandy." And last year, November 15 brought over 6". Those are rare enough to be memorable, and don't linger.

Ditto snows after March 6 or so. 1996 and 2018 brought a batch of later snows. Memorable later snows were the "Storm of the Century", March 12-13, 1993, the Blizzard of 1888, Easter Sunday 1970, and April 7, 1982. Those fall in the category of "rare enough to be memorable."

As far as warmth, there are hot pre-June and post-September 6 days. In 1976, on Easter Sunday it hit 96F, the warmest for the summer. In 1969 it hit 97 on May 29, the hottest for a generally cool and soggy summer. As for end of season heat, New York's latest 100 is September 2 or 3, 1953. Calendar years 1953, 1970, 1973, 1983, 1991, 1993, 1995, and 2010 featured very hot late Augusts into early September. Later than that, 90's do happen but very rarely take the form of three-day in a row periods necessary for heat wave classification. In fact it hit 92 yesterday, and today it's a dreary 54 with drizzle and rain.

Despite these outliers, then, summer really has to be considered as some variant on June, July and August and winter some variant on December, January and February. Seasons defined under the Roman Empire based on Mediterranean climates don't cut it for the large temperature zone cities.
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
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I consider it summer when I typically don't need a jacket (i.e. it's maybe 73-75+ during the day). In D.C. that usually means from early May through early October.



I consider it winter when I have to expect snow and ice. In D.C. that's basically from December through mid March, so close to the official calendar definition of winter.

Spring and fall are fairly short around here.
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:45 PM
 
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Winter: Bare trees, gloomy skies, temps 40s and below. Snow and ice on a lot of days. Technically where I live, winter starts around mid-November and lasts until early-mid April.

Spring: High temps start to be in the 50s during the days, then gradually we get more days in 60s and 70s. Flowers bloom and the world comes to life, etc. Where I live generally begins in mid-April and ends late May.

Summer: High temperatures consistently in the 70s, mostly 80s and sometimes 90s. Everything at the peak of life, insects abound. Here it almost always begins the last week of May and ends around the last week of September.

Autumn: Leaves begin to change color, temps cool down, leaves fall of trees. The trees can start turning a little in mid-Sept but there will still be summer temps then. Fall doesn't really start start until October. Sometimes the first week of October, other years mid-October for sure. Lasts for about a month.

As you can see by the time period of the 'true season begin/end date' rather than the "official" meteorological dates, Spring/Autumn are a lot shorter and very much known as 'transitional seasons' compared to Summer & Winter. October is fall, September and November really isn't. Last November especially was very winter-y. Spring is a little longer, but still not as long as Summer or Winter.

For ease of use and to simplify things, it's not the end of the world to say, for example, fall begins on Sept 1 and ends on Nov. 30th etc but technically yeah it doesn't make much sense. By the 30th of November for at least two weeks we have already had our first snow fall and many frosty nights, all the leaves have already fallen, it's not fall anymore it's straight-up winter even though they say it's fall. Another example: September. September is always a summer month that's just slightly cooler compared to July & August but the cooldown is so subtle that to call it 'fall' is pretty laughable.
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:14 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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In London the period of average highs below 10c almost perfectly lines up with the meteorological definition of winter (Dec-Feb). The dates when average highs are above 20c runs from June to the middle of September.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Summer here in coastal GA is April to October. Fall is November and December. Winter is Jan and Feb. Spring is March.
Pretty much the same in central FL. Or as I say it: life begins in October.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:37 PM
 
8,350 posts, read 5,264,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springsux View Post
As you can see by the time period of the 'true season begin/end date' rather than the "official" meteorological dates, Spring/Autumn are a lot shorter and very much known as 'transitional seasons' compared to Summer & Winter. ...
Your climate appears to be similar to ours. And considering that during the transitional month(s), it might be in the high 70s one day, then snowing the next, we might call the transitional seasons tussle between the two extreme ones... resulting in there really being only two seasons, mega-winter and mega-summer.

So much for the much-vaunted "4 season climate".
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