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Old 10-06-2019, 03:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma. The northern or higher altitude parts colder. Southern part Arkansas is about 10 degrees warmer than northern Arkansas. Even northern Arkansas not seeing much snow last few years. More likely to get ice. Southern Arkansas unless its high terrain, dont think they see snow at all. Similar to NE Texas.


Heck use a gardening zone map. Here is link to govt map: https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/


I would guess you want 7B or 8A zone. 7A little colder, longer winter but not by much. Be aware altitude matters.
^^^^More or less, this. If you're on the northern fringes of this area, it's not unusual to have snow in November or March, but it won't stick around. A bit further south, particularly southern Arkansas/Oklahoma, tends to have a more "inconsistent" winter, where you'll have a cold snap for 2 or 3 days and then have several days of near-shorts weather with high temps in the 60's.
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Old 10-06-2019, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
16 posts, read 2,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tij View Post
Something like Yerevan comes to mind, probably less snowy than you prefer though.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yerevan

Some places in N China and Korea have wet summers but also tend to have short, but cold winters.

For north america, maybe something in Kansas or Colorado could work?
Yerevan probably gets about 25-30" of snow annually. It looks like a climate from northern Kansas or southern Nebraska. Most similar substantial population center in North America is probably Lincoln.
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Old 10-06-2019, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Central IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenderFrost View Post
Why would you even want that ? Isn't winter the best season of them all ?
Only if you like being contrary.
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Old 10-06-2019, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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In my opinion, I'd classify many US cities on the northern end of the "Cfa" classification as having "cold but short winters". Most of the time it's warm enough that as a Canadian I wouldn't even consider it winter. But there are always a few cold weeks due to the polar vortex which I'd consider to be winter-like.

Last edited by segfault1361; 10-06-2019 at 06:38 PM..
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Old 10-06-2019, 09:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahdebrink View Post
I'm imagining a place with a 3 month "winter monsoon" followed by hot dry weather most of the year. Is this even possible?

Truckee, California comes close to that. Bipolar weather: warm to hot bone dry summers and relatively short winters with a lot of snow and on occassion sub-zero cold snaps.
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Old 10-06-2019, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
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Depends on what you mean by "cold" and "short."

If you mean a place with cold weather for no more than four months that stays below freezing in the coldest month, Turpan comes to mind easily. Also, it's in Zone 7a despite having an average January low of 10.2F, so it must be a consistent cold with little variation.

If you mean a place that has highs below 50F at all but for even less than the average 3-month length of a season, the Upland South of the U.S. probably has what you're looking for in many places. Tennessee (excluding Memphis and places above 2400ft), western NC (excluding places above 2400ft), Arkansas (excluding along the southern and eastern borders) and parts of Oklahoma come to mind, as does Roanoke in Virginia.

If you mean a place that's cold enough for winter snowpack but has a less-than-three-month period of average highs below 50F, I don't know of anywhere even close. The coldest month has to have a mean below 27F for snowpack, and 50F+ average highs in meteorological winter usually happen in the subtropics in February and/or December.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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I think we are a good contender here in northern Italy.


I think our winters are decently cold, we have highs below 10c from mid November to mid February, and snow isn't really a weird event (earliest i've seen was mid November, and latest the first week of March, but historically it has snowed well until April)


On the other end, the weather remains quite mild until late October, and by March it generally feels like spring, with plenty of days with highs in the 15-20c range. Our winters are rarely very long, it's mostly wintry from late november until sometime in February.
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Old 10-07-2019, 12:17 PM
DKM
 
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahdebrink View Post
In most continental climates with cold winters, the winter season often drags along for many months. Snow can fall anytime between November and April in much of the northern US for example.

But are these places with very short but cold winters? Like, a short burst of cold and snow followed by a significantly longer warm season?

I'm imagining a place with a 3 month "winter monsoon" followed by hot dry weather most of the year. Is this even possible?
St. George Utah? Or if you want more snow, Flagstaff AZ.
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Old 10-07-2019, 02:57 PM
 
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New York City or Munich for about a few weeks in January maybe.
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Old 10-07-2019, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
6,468 posts, read 3,720,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptunepenguins View Post
New York City or Munich for about a few weeks in January maybe.

Both of these places have a wintry March. Well at least NYC has quite mild novembers.
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