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Old 10-07-2019, 04:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahdebrink View Post
In most continental climates with cold winters, the winter season often drags along for many months. Snow can fall anytime between November and April in much of the northern US for example.

But are these places with very short but cold winters? Like, a short burst of cold and snow followed by a significantly longer warm season?

I'm imagining a place with a 3 month "winter monsoon" followed by hot dry weather most of the year. Is this even possible?
Big Bear Lake, California. Situated at 6,700 feet in the San Bernardino Mountains in Southern California. Winter can be cold with significant snowfall at times, but the area also has many sunny, warm-ish days in winter as well. Plus, the overall climate is Mediterranean, although with more of an alpine influence due to the elevation. The Mediterranean climate reduces the number of storms that enter the area, and basically restricts both rain and snow to the November-March time period. Big Bear is somewhat similar to Denver, Colorado, in terms of temps -- and likely has just as much or perhaps more overall sunshine per year.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bear_Lake,_California

Last edited by AnthonyJ34; 10-07-2019 at 04:27 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-07-2019, 06:20 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,252 posts, read 15,164,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HJ99 View Post
So those two days you can build a snowman on the beach?
It did fit the question asked - "cold but short"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neptunepenguins View Post
New York City or Munich for about a few weeks in January maybe.
As a NYC resident for nearly 20 years recently and having grown up in the greater NYC metro area, NYC's winter is not short. It begins early December and generally lasts until at least mid-March. I do not consider 3.5 months "short".

Having left my snow shovel back in NYC when we moved to southwest TN 7 years ago, I would classify the winters here as cold but short: jacket needed from mid-December through the end of February. On occasion, snow requiring a snow shovel - finally bought one last winter as we had 2". It was pretty until it melted about 3 days later, never got that black exhaust look as much of the snow up north gets after sitting around for 2 months or longer. However, I haven't worn a winter jacket for most days here with the exception of walking the dogs in the field after dark - brrr, and I even had to find my gloves for that - only 1 pair - as opposed to the pair of gloves and mittens on top when I lived up north along with a scarf and hat under my parka and boots to go along with that. Additionally, it's nice to be able to start the car and give it 5 minutes for the frost and ice to be gone from the windows.


Additionally, the initial question was about "continental climates" which begs the question: which continent? We've seen people assume it means Europe, a Canadian who also assumed it means the North American content, and many others who did jump to believing NA. I wonder where are the Australia and Asia inhabitants.
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Old 10-07-2019, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
Additionally, the initial question was about "continental climates" which begs the question: which continent? We've seen people assume it means Europe, a Canadian who also assumed it means the North American content, and many others who did jump to believing NA. I wonder where are the Australia and Asia inhabitants.
Good question. Central Asia is VERY dry and continental.
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Old 10-07-2019, 11:34 PM
 
Location: South Carolina - The Palmetto State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DKM View Post
St. George Utah? Or if you want more snow, Flagstaff AZ.
I think St George is too low in elevation to see much snow - hence the nickname "Utah's Dixie"

Cedar City, UT (about 50 miles up I-15) and it's nearly 3000 ft higher elevation would see much more snow/cold than St George - but may not quite have the hotter summer temps.

Flagstaff, AZ has fairly long winters due to the 7000 ft elevation
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Old Yesterday, 06:46 AM
 
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I'm in the Mojave at the moment. We see snow on the surrounding mountains, can easily drive to play in the snow but get no snow here.

We only have a few days below freezing and winter is fairly short- lived. Summer, with triple digit heat, can drag on unmercifully!
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Old Yesterday, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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I think cities in the southern Appalachian piedmont come the closest - Charlottesville VA and Asheville NC for example. The problem with the piedmont is, you tend to get ice storms fairly frequently in the winter. Here in the SC upstate it's warmer than that - for much of the winter, you can get by with a jacket or sweater outside, and we average about 3" of snow a season (which we got in a single December snowfall last year). When I lived in Chapel Hill NC, the climate was somewhere in between Charlottesville VA and Greenville SC.

But I don't think there's anywhere in the U.S. (or probably the Americas) where you're going to find a cold winter "monsoon" season with hot dry weather the rest of the year.

Last edited by Vasily; Yesterday at 11:04 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 10:37 AM
 
Location: SE Estonia
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In my opinion, a winter can be called a cold winter when it owns a month with daily mean below Celsius zero.

Here is Sanandaj, a city in Iran, where winter is cold but not long:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanandaj#Climate
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Old Yesterday, 12:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cougfan View Post
I think St George is too low in elevation to see much snow - hence the nickname "Utah's Dixie"

Cedar City, UT (about 50 miles up I-15) and it's nearly 3000 ft higher elevation would see much more snow/cold than St George - but may not quite have the hotter summer temps.

Flagstaff, AZ has fairly long winters due to the 7000 ft elevation
Cedar City is pretty. And you are right: the higher elevation there results in cooler weather than in nearby St. George. I believe itís still relatively dry/arid though. But the surrounding countryside is fairly lush, at least for several moths.
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Old Yesterday, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
240 posts, read 49,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anhityk View Post
In my opinion, a winter can be called a cold winter when it owns a month with daily mean below Celsius zero.

Here is Sanandaj, a city in Iran, where winter is cold but not long:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanandaj#Climate
That's a much better example of this than anything I ever knew of! I tried to help, but I just felt like Turpan winters are too long and Upland U.S. South winters not cold enough for what they're looking for.
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Old Today, 02:25 AM
 
Location: South Carolina - The Palmetto State
1,020 posts, read 1,552,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyJ34 View Post
Cedar City is pretty. And you are right: the higher elevation there results in cooler weather than in nearby St. George. I believe it’s still relatively dry/arid though. But the surrounding countryside is fairly lush, at least for several moths.
You're right. Cedar City does have a little more "lushness" - probably the elevation wrings out a bit more moisture. Still fairly dry especially the summer months.


Maybe spend summer in Cedar City - Winter in St George


Both cities sure have been blessed by being near incredible National parks.
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