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View Poll Results: Do you consider Victoria, BC to have a warm temperate climate?
Yes 2 13.33%
No 13 86.67%
Voters: 15. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-05-2019, 10:08 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Do you consider Victoria, BC to have a warm temperate climate? What does warm temperate mean to you?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor...lumbia#Climate
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:51 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
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Nope, Victoria has an oceanic type climate, maybe Mediterranean oceanic because of the precipitation pattern. "Warm temperate" to me means a Cfa climate with colder winters (average 0-8 C / 32-46 F).
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:52 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawa1992 View Post
Nope, Victoria has an Mediterranean oceanic type climate.
What is a warm temperate climate to you?
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Old 10-05-2019, 11:18 PM
tij
 
Location: Providence, RI
365 posts, read 81,434 times
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To me 'warm temperate' could be used to describe a climate like Bilbao or Auckland, where summer is too mild to be tranditionally subtropical but isn't short either, and most of the year could be considered rather mild weather.

I'd view places like Victoria, or London etc as cool-temperate instead, where there is a period of warm weather but most of the year is on the cool side (ie in the 40s and 50s and perhaps low 60s f). Somewhere like Portland or Cognac would be transitional in this scheme.



Otoh, warm temperate could also refer to what I'd view as mesothermal or cool Cfa climates like NYC, DC, Nashville, perhaps like Bologna, Nanjing, or Belgrade for non US examples

Last edited by tij; 10-05-2019 at 11:38 PM..
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Old 10-05-2019, 11:43 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Is there a huge difference in the amount of plants that a Cfa warm temperate climate and a Cfb oceanic climate can grow with the same winter averages and hardiness zone?
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Old 10-05-2019, 11:50 PM
tij
 
Location: Providence, RI
365 posts, read 81,434 times
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To me 'warm temperate' would be more aptly used to describe a climate like Bilbao or Auckland, where summer is too mild to be tranditionally subtropical but isn't short either, and most of the year could be considered rather mild weather.

I'd view places like Victoria, or London etc as cool-temperate instead, where there is a period of warm weather but most of the year is on the cool side (ie in the 40s and 50s and perhaps low 60s f). Somewhere like Portland or Cognac would be transitional in this scheme.



Otoh, warm temperate could also refer to what I'd view as mesothermal or cooler-end Cfa climates like NYC, DC, Nashville, perhaps like Bologna or Nanjing for non US examples. Places where winters are chilly or cool but too mild to retain a snowpack and summer is fairly hot.
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Old 10-06-2019, 12:46 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,229 posts, read 12,164,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tij View Post
To me 'warm temperate' would be more aptly used to describe a climate like Bilbao or Auckland, where summer is too mild to be tranditionally subtropical but isn't short either, and most of the year could be considered rather mild weather.

I'd view places like Victoria, or London etc as cool-temperate instead, where there is a period of warm weather but most of the year is on the cool side (ie in the 40s and 50s and perhaps low 60s f). Somewhere like Portland or Cognac would be transitional in this scheme.



Otoh, warm temperate could also refer to what I'd view as mesothermal or cooler-end Cfa climates like NYC, DC, Nashville, perhaps like Bologna or Nanjing for non US examples. Places where winters are chilly or cool but too mild to retain a snowpack and summer is fairly hot.
Victoria has milder winters than NYC and DC and is in a higher hardiness zone.
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Old 10-06-2019, 04:30 AM
 
374 posts, read 103,436 times
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Those poor souls have no winter
Avg low is +4C ? WTF ?!? That's exactly the most miserable transition between the fall and winter, when it's not a snow, just a heavy slush.


Summers are awesome, though. Avg is 20, so probably not a lot of 37 'C days...
You probably don't even need an AC in the summer there...
How's the humidity, though ?




How far does one have to go inland till it gets to at least -30 'C in winter ? 1,000 km ?
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Old 10-06-2019, 04:50 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
698 posts, read 409,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenderFrost View Post
Those poor souls have no winter
Avg low is +4C ? WTF ?!? That's exactly the most miserable transition between the fall and winter, when it's not a snow, just a heavy slush.


Summers are awesome, though. Avg is 20, so probably not a lot of 37 'C days...
You probably don't even need an AC in the summer there...
How's the humidity, though ?




How far does one have to go inland till it gets to at least -30 'C in winter ? 1,000 km ?
-30C in winter is unheard of on the coast. You might get it in the mountains though.

I wouldn’t call it a warm temperate climate, I’d call it an oceanic/mediterranean hybrid climate. It has a fully Med. precipitation pattern but relatively cool winters.
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Old 10-06-2019, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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i don't see how a place with a 17/18c average in July would be considered warm temperate.

It looks like the epitome of the temperate climate.
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