U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Unread 02-04-2009, 02:16 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,163 posts, read 19,494,564 times
Reputation: 16061
No "cities" in Keweenaw County, but there are a couple on the Keweenaw Peninsula.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 03-03-2009, 10:01 AM
 
2 posts, read 53,136 times
Reputation: 11
Alaska is appx 1/5 the size of the entire continental U.S. We have more miles of coastline than the entire continental U.S.. We have more than 1,000,000 lakes. I assure you there is no way any state can possibly see or hold more snow than we do.

Anchorage itself sees average annual snowfall from about 70 inches on the west side to about 90 inches on the east side at low elevations. The 24-hour record for snowfall in Anchorage, set in March 2002 is 37.5 inches.
Nearby Valdez has it a little rougher. This small city sees an average annual snowfall of 325.6 inches. Their record annual snowfall is 556.7 inches.
I live in Fairbanks, which is considered a sub-arctic desert. We do well to manage 60-70 inches of annual snowfall. Our weather cross to bear is temperature swing, from -65 below zero degrees Fahrenheit in the winter to 95 above in the summer. In the winter it can stay below zero degees here for weeks, even months on end.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 03-03-2009, 10:27 AM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
14,714 posts, read 12,321,400 times
Reputation: 4489
Quote:
Originally Posted by allhaileris View Post
Alaska is appx 1/5 the size of the entire continental U.S. We have more miles of coastline than the entire continental U.S.. We have more than 1,000,000 lakes. I assure you there is no way any state can possibly see or hold more snow than we do.

Anchorage itself sees average annual snowfall from about 70 inches on the west side to about 90 inches on the east side at low elevations. The 24-hour record for snowfall in Anchorage, set in March 2002 is 37.5 inches.
Nearby Valdez has it a little rougher. This small city sees an average annual snowfall of 325.6 inches. Their record annual snowfall is 556.7 inches.
I live in Fairbanks, which is considered a sub-arctic desert. We do well to manage 60-70 inches of annual snowfall. Our weather cross to bear is temperature swing, from -65 below zero degrees Fahrenheit in the winter to 95 above in the summer. In the winter it can stay below zero degees here for weeks, even months on end.
Mt Baker (in Washington) has the world record for snowfall, followed by Mt Rainier.

"Although the Arctic is known as a snowy place, it is in fact a desert where very little snow actually falls. The snow that does fall, however, stays around a long time, giving the impression of much snow.

So where did the MOST snow fall?

The world record for the most snow in one year is now held by Mount Baker (elevation: 10,775 feet / 3,285 meters) in Washington State, USA. The Mount Baker Ski Area reported 1,140 inches (95 feet) / 2,896 cm (29 meters) of snowfall for the 1998-99 season.
"

Mount Baker - World Record Snowfall

No place on earth gets more snow than the highest peaks of the Pacific Northwest. The combination of consistently wet westerly winds and 10,000+ foot-high peaks very near the ocean results in a veritable dumping of snow every year. Alaska may be colder, but we get a LOT more snow (at least up on the higher peaks).

Ken

Last edited by LordBalfor; 03-03-2009 at 10:36 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 03-18-2009, 11:24 AM
 
2 posts, read 53,136 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Mt Baker (in Washington) has the world record for snowfall, followed by Mt Rainier.

"Although the Arctic is known as a snowy place, it is in fact a desert where very little snow actually falls. The snow that does fall, however, stays around a long time, giving the impression of much snow.

So where did the MOST snow fall?

The world record for the most snow in one year is now held by Mount Baker (elevation: 10,775 feet / 3,285 meters) in Washington State, USA. The Mount Baker Ski Area reported 1,140 inches (95 feet) / 2,896 cm (29 meters) of snowfall for the 1998-99 season.
"

Mount Baker - World Record Snowfall

No place on earth gets more snow than the highest peaks of the Pacific Northwest. The combination of consistently wet westerly winds and 10,000+ foot-high peaks very near the ocean results in a veritable dumping of snow every year. Alaska may be colder, but we get a LOT more snow (at least up on the higher peaks).

Ken
Oh, see I thought the question was which state gets the most snowfall. Do you stack 95 feet in a column, or do you spread it out over a vast area? Say 1,067,425 square miles, like Alaska? (of which only 1/3 is 'arctic').

But that's a lot of snow, for sure. Do people live there? We have a small city called Valdez (pronounced 'valdeez) that averages 305.8 inches per year.
[SIZE=+1][/SIZE]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 03-18-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
14,714 posts, read 12,321,400 times
Reputation: 4489
Quote:
Originally Posted by allhaileris View Post
Oh, see I thought the question was which state gets the most snowfall. Do you stack 95 feet in a column, or do you spread it out over a vast area? Say 1,067,425 square miles, like Alaska? (of which only 1/3 is 'arctic').

But that's a lot of snow, for sure. Do people live there? We have a small city called Valdez (pronounced 'valdeez) that averages 305.8 inches per year.
[SIZE=+1][/SIZE]
Yeah, I see what you are saying, and indeed you may be right in your interpretation.

In regards to people living in these high snowfall areas - the answer is "not that I know of". These are readings on the mountain's flanks (ski areas etc).

Ken
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-08-2009, 05:30 PM
 
Location: British Columbia.
343 posts, read 822,511 times
Reputation: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Mt Baker (in Washington) has the world record for snowfall, followed by Mt Rainier.

"Although the Arctic is known as a snowy place, it is in fact a desert where very little snow actually falls. The snow that does fall, however, stays around a long time, giving the impression of much snow.

So where did the MOST snow fall?

The world record for the most snow in one year is now held by Mount Baker (elevation: 10,775 feet / 3,285 meters) in Washington State, USA. The Mount Baker Ski Area reported 1,140 inches (95 feet) / 2,896 cm (29 meters) of snowfall for the 1998-99 season."

Mount Baker - World Record Snowfall

No place on earth gets more snow than the highest peaks of the Pacific Northwest. The combination of consistently wet westerly winds and 10,000+ foot-high peaks very near the ocean results in a veritable dumping of snow every year. Alaska may be colder, but we get a LOT more snow (at least up on the higher peaks).

Ken

If we are talking about locations then the Pacific Northwest is the king of snowfall. Pretty much anywhere along the coastal mountains from SE Alaska down through BC, Washington to Oregon gets high amounts of snowfall. Of course no one lives in these places.

As Ken pointed out the deepest snows in the world have been recorded on Mt Rainier and Mt Baker. Both spots recorded close to 100 feet in one season. The coastal range of British Columbia sees some pretty impressive snowfall totals as well.

I think its hard for people to realize back east just how much snow falls in the coastal ranges. So I would say Washington State and Alaska probably record the most snowfall for any location in a season in the continental United States.

In Canada it would be British Columbia.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-14-2009, 10:13 PM
 
Location: planet octupulous is nearing earths atmosphere
11,275 posts, read 5,117,792 times
Reputation: 19024
mt baker washington state!! i was there in the 1980's it has the most snow fall in the country.. been to rainer too it snows a lot at rainer but not as much as baker.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-18-2009, 09:08 PM
 
399 posts, read 155,888 times
Reputation: 113
Omg.. The weird thing is that one of the hottest cities in America. Phoenix, Arizona is only 150 miles south from one of the few coldest/snowiest cities in America. Just 150 apart difference. Flagstaff gets over 100" inches of snow. A complete 180'. Less then 150 miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-18-2009, 09:20 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
14,714 posts, read 12,321,400 times
Reputation: 4489
Quote:
Originally Posted by stilldirrty View Post
Omg.. The weird thing is that one of the hottest cities in America. Phoenix, Arizona is only 150 miles south from one of the few coldest/snowiest cities in America. Just 150 apart difference. Flagstaff gets over 100" inches of snow. A complete 180'. Less then 150 miles.

That's what mountains will do for you.
Same thing is true in Washington state - where less than 100 miles from Mt Rainier you are in desert.

Ken
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 04-20-2009, 06:13 PM
 
Location: British Columbia.
343 posts, read 822,511 times
Reputation: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by stilldirrty View Post
Omg.. The weird thing is that one of the hottest cities in America. Phoenix, Arizona is only 150 miles south from one of the few coldest/snowiest cities in America. Just 150 apart difference. Flagstaff gets over 100" inches of snow. A complete 180'. Less then 150 miles.

I think this is something alot of people who grew up and live back east dont really comprehend till they move out west. The climate can change drasitically within a few miles in the mountain states.

For instance in vancouver it rains most of the winter, but literally you can go 5 or 10 miles out of the city and you will just dumped on with snow!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top