U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-27-2008, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Minnesota, USA
7,437 posts, read 7,615,968 times
Reputation: 5912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autumn07 View Post
Is it hard to drive in snow?
I've never lived in a state with snow or driven through snow before.
I was just curious- have always thought it would be neat to live in a state that gets all four seasons.
Certainly Arizona has snow in the mountains!

As for driving in snow, well, it's not like they let it accumulate two feet on the highways Usually they get to it before it gets serious - but the main issue isn't penetrating the snow, it's how slippery it gets. Freezing rain is probably even worse than snow in this regard, and at times glare ice forms on the road. Generally, though, here in northern Minnesota, where we average about 80 inches of snow a year, there are only maybe ten days out of the year where driving is any more difficult than usual due to snow / ice. Of course, there's this one house where my sister's friend lives, and it was up a narrow driveway on a steep hill, and being unmaintained, that was treacherous.

Having a front wheel drive car really helps with traction on slippery / snowy roadways - although rear wheel drive vehicles are a blast for doing circle spins (some people up here call them by the indecorous name of "whippin' ****ties) All-wheel drive vehicles are very nice in the sense that there's very few times when you can't get enough traction, and are very fun to drive on unmaintained trails (back in high school kids with SUVs or trucks used to purposely crash them into snowbanks!).
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-02-2008, 02:19 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 5,967,416 times
Reputation: 2203
Driving in the snow is hard, especially if you're not used to it. People will try to tell you otherwise, but they probably have years of experience and like snow. If you like snow, you can probably learn. If you hate snow, driving in the snow will make you hate snow even more. There are aspects that you don't even realize until you have to drive in the snow...for example, the salt they use to melt the snow makes it harder to see the white lines on the pavement. No one is stopping you from moving but ask yourself if it's really worth it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2008, 06:50 AM
 
20 posts, read 43,496 times
Reputation: 26
It's hard if you've never done it before. If you haven't grown up around snow, and then move to a state where it snows when you're, say 18, it can be really difficult the first winter. After that you kind of get used to it though, but I don't think you ever get as good as someone who's grown up around snow. Also, driving a rear wheel drive truck with nothing in the back reeeeally sucks in snow, or rain, or any inclement weather.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2008, 08:01 AM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,496 posts, read 24,688,721 times
Reputation: 14817
I was thinking about this thread when I was driving around town last night. It was snowing~heavy snow and the wind was blowing so the snow that had already fallen and was on the ground was blowing all over. A huge thing to think about while driving in the snow is the fact that it's so hard to see WHILE it's snowing and blowing. The streets were covered so of course, the only thing you could do is hope that the person who drove there before you had stayed in the lines cause the only thing you can do is follow the tracks. Then of course, there was a bit of ice accumulating on the windshield wipers so it was hard to see. Intersections, of course were very slippery so you had to stop very carefully. It's really not as simple as just "driving in snow". Now for those people who had to be out on the interstate or other roads~it couldn't have been pleasant at all cause their visibility had to be extremely low at times. I've experienced that a lot in the past and for me, it's just terrifying to be on the interstate, not be able to see, have semis pass and throw snow on my car where I couldn't see for a half mile. Then you try to slow down cause you have no idea where you're at, but you fear being rear-ended. Just no picnic as far as I'm concerned.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2008, 02:45 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 5,967,416 times
Reputation: 2203
I don't think growing up where it snows makes a difference. Even if you grow up somewhere cold, you start driving when you're 16. If you move somewhere warm when you're 18, that doesn't give you much experience driving in the snow.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2009, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Minnesota, USA
7,437 posts, read 7,615,968 times
Reputation: 5912
Note: After one of the snowiest Decembers on record in Duluth, MN, I take back my comment completely. Driving in snow is a pain, especially if your tires are getting bare.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2009, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
7,615 posts, read 6,104,761 times
Reputation: 10387
I had to pick up a new car in Green Bay last Monday and coming home was a nightmare. West wind blowing snow across the interstate, turning icey and people still driving 65 mph or more, passing me like I was standing still.

I slowed down because a trooper passed me with flashing lights, semi in front of me slowed way down put his flashers on, first sunny and dry, then a white out with ice. Eventually everyone got stopped with no crashes but we had to move over to the shoulder. I was worried about trucks or cars plowing into us as we crept along because they hadn't slowed down. We passed cars that had crashed into each other, some had gone off the road, it could have been alot worse. I felt like kissing the ground when I got to Two Rivers.

Key is don't overdrive conditions, be over confident because you have front wheel drive, 4 or all wheel drive, speed is the problem, people refuse to slow down even when they can't see. I knew what I was doing, but I was afraid of being rear ended.

Last edited by susancruzs; 01-02-2009 at 07:33 AM.. Reason: paragraphs
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2009, 08:56 AM
 
6,046 posts, read 5,967,416 times
Reputation: 2203
A lot of people with 4 wheel drive think they can speed in the snow. They're the people that end up in ditches.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2009, 08:59 AM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,496 posts, read 24,688,721 times
Reputation: 14817
Quote:
Originally Posted by city_data91 View Post
A lot of people with 4 wheel drive think they can speed in the snow. They're the people that end up in ditches.
Yup, or are over-confident on ice because they have 4 wheel drive. Honestly, nothing really helps when there's ice.

Susan, I can totally identify with what you're saying. I used to have to be on the interstate nearly every day for many winters and I'm so glad I can now just crawl around town.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2009, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
397 posts, read 834,970 times
Reputation: 177
City interstates aren't usually any worse than city roads. The plows do a good job keeping them clear and since more people are driving on it, the cars melt away the snow faster. At least that's usually the case.

Driving in the snow is only bad if it's snowing really hard. I've taken a couple of harrowing drives where the roads were still pretty packed (with cars I mean) and the roads hadn't yet been plowed and it was really cold and snowing really hard at that point. When it's just starting to accumulate and it's coming down fast, that's when it's the worst.

In the second video that was in that post on the first page, the biggest mistake the first car made was that they KEPT DRIVING. If you start sliding, stop driving. Just turn the wheel in the best direction. Keep your feet off the pedals. That's why that guy bounced down every street. They kept trying to accelerate or brake out of it.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top