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Old 06-11-2007, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
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A mild winter is when the lowest temperature does not get below 0 in Farenheit. However, I do not consider the cold to be too harsh unless the temperature is lower than -10F. Temperatures lower than -10F do not happen very often in the KC metro either. Winters are MUCH warmer than they were years ago. I think climate change is having more of an effect on the average temperatures in the winter compared with the summer. I like cold and winter sports so that is why I am thinking about moving to New England.
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Old 06-11-2007, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 215,711 times
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I usually break it down into five tiers.

Zone 1: Frigid winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures common.
Zone 2: Harsh winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures occasionally.
Zone 3: Mild winters. Snow infrequent or rare. Subfreezing temperatures common.
Zone 4: Very light winters. Snow rare. Subfreezing temperatures occasionally.
Zone 5: No winter. Snow impossible. Subfreezing temperatures almost impossible.
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Old 06-11-2007, 11:36 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
A mild winter is when the lowest temperature does not get below 0 in Farenheit. However, I do not consider the cold to be too harsh unless the temperature is lower than -10F. Temperatures lower than -10F do not happen very often in the KC metro either. Winters are MUCH warmer than they were years ago. I think climate change is having more of an effect on the average temperatures in the winter compared with the summer. I like cold and winter sports so that is why I am thinking about moving to New England.
Cleveland rarely gets below 0 and so does Chicago. Are those mild winters? I honestly consider KC and STL's winters to be somewhere in between harsh and mild. They are too cold and get too much snow for me to consider them mild. Mild I would give to Memphis and Little Rock. My definition of a mild winter is one in which little or snow falls and the temperature never gets very far below 32 degrees fahrenheit. KC and STL's winters get into the teens and single digits. Anything below 32 degrees fahrenheit, especially in teens and single digits...I consider very freezing. Winters may be warmer, but i still wouldn't call them mild. Far too cold and too much snow.
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Old 06-11-2007, 11:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
I usually break it down into five tiers.

Zone 1: Frigid winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures common.
Zone 2: Harsh winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures occasionally.
Zone 3: Mild winters. Snow infrequent or rare. Subfreezing temperatures common.
Zone 4: Very light winters. Snow rare. Subfreezing temperatures occasionally.
Zone 5: No winter. Snow impossible. Subfreezing temperatures almost impossible.
That's a perfect map Default. I agree completely with that map. Mild winters I would define as those lying within Zone 3 or below. Anything in zones 1 and 2 are definite winters and most areas in that region have humid continental climates and four very distinct seasons.
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Old 06-11-2007, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 215,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Cleveland rarely gets below 0 and so does Chicago. Are those mild winters? I honestly consider KC and STL's winters to be somewhere in between harsh and mild. They are too cold and get too much snow for me to consider them mild. Mild I would give to Memphis and Little Rock. My definition of a mild winter is one in which little or snow falls and the temperature never gets very far below 32 degrees fahrenheit. KC and STL's winters get into the teens and single digits. Anything below 32 degrees fahrenheit, especially in teens and single digits...I consider very freezing. Winters may be warmer, but i still wouldn't call them mild. Far too cold and too much snow.
Same here man. Nashville is a perfect example of a mild winter, not Chicago.
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Old 06-12-2007, 02:48 AM
 
Location: Henderson NV
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Mild winters in the two cities I've lived in, average in the months from November to February - Los Angeles, 74. Las Vegas, 67.
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Old 06-12-2007, 06:23 AM
 
66 posts, read 234,368 times
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A mild winter is avoiding a dead battery or a flat tire with the wind chill twenty below, and your cell phone at home with your gloves, hat, and jumper cables.
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:10 AM
 
Location: The great state of New Hampshire
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A mild winter to me is anything experienced by the pacific northwest. I love their weather from a temperature standpoint as opposed to the northeast. The temps in some instances may not be discernful, but the wind chills are! None of that Cold Canadian arctic air that invades the country east of the Rockies. I love the distinct New England seasons and 30-40 degrees for a quarter of the year suits me fine. But when your talking 10 degrees here and there, sub zero windchills, 40 degrees at times once we're into April after being teased w/ 70 degrees, that makes me yearn for better and more consistent weather than what you get in New England. Of course if I lived in around Seattle for one winter, then I'd be begging for arctic air rather than pondering if the sun still is a recognized star in our solar system.
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Old 06-12-2007, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,193 posts, read 20,714,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Cleveland rarely gets below 0 and so does Chicago. Are those mild winters? I honestly consider KC and STL's winters to be somewhere in between harsh and mild. They are too cold and get too much snow for me to consider them mild. Mild I would give to Memphis and Little Rock. My definition of a mild winter is one in which little or snow falls and the temperature never gets very far below 32 degrees fahrenheit. KC and STL's winters get into the teens and single digits. Anything below 32 degrees fahrenheit, especially in teens and single digits...I consider very freezing. Winters may be warmer, but i still wouldn't call them mild. Far too cold and too much snow.
I have lived in the Upper Midwest before and the winters that KC and STL experience are a joke in comparison The average temperatures in the winter season have been rising compared with normal over a long period of time, and many winters a snow drought is present, especially in KC.
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Old 06-12-2007, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,193 posts, read 20,714,966 times
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Post Zone 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by DefaultAlias View Post
I usually break it down into five tiers.

Zone 1: Frigid winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures common.
Zone 2: Harsh winters. Snow frequent. Subzero temperatures occasionally.
Zone 3: Mild winters. Snow infrequent or rare. Subfreezing temperatures common.
Zone 4: Very light winters. Snow rare. Subfreezing temperatures occasionally.
Zone 5: No winter. Snow impossible. Subfreezing temperatures almost impossible.
I agree with the map for the most part, but I would extend the zone 1 region further south into South Dakota, the rest of Minnesota, most of Wisconsin, Wyoming, parts of Idaho, and mountain areas of Colorado and Utah. Zone 1 should also be extended a little further south in New England as well. All of these areas commonly experience temperatures below zero in the winter. Most of these areas also can have low temperatures lower than -20F in a typical winter.
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