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Old 05-08-2009, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 5,491,787 times
Reputation: 2836

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Quote:
Originally Posted by koyaanisqatsi1 View Post
If you look in the database, you'll find those months are well deserved after a extremely hot January (especially) and February (during the first week).
NO

And February wasn't hot at all. Besides that ONE 46C day, NO OTHER DAY EXCEEDED 35C. Infact, we had a string of cold and cloudy 20C days lasting about a week rightr after that hot day.

Quote:
In fact you need to go back to 1996 (spring) to see the start of several consecutive months (or years) having much drier, sunnier and warmer weather than usual. Very rare nowadays for Victoria to get a cold month (below average) as well as wet and cloudy. You can bleat negatively as much as you like but you don't fool me. I have official BOM data which tells me a different story to what you've been claiming all along!
Wet and cloudy weather here is not rare. Obviousley you must've had your head in the sand during your time year.
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Old 05-08-2009, 02:55 AM
 
Location: Eastern Sydney, Australia
2,400 posts, read 2,615,014 times
Reputation: 1532
Quote:
Originally Posted by 你B View Post
NO

And February wasn't hot at all. Besides that ONE 46C day, NO OTHER DAY EXCEEDED 35C. Infact, we had a string of cold and cloudy 20C days lasting about a week rightr after that hot day.

Wet and cloudy weather here is not rare. Obviousley you must've had your head in the sand during your time year.
As I said before, look at the official BOM data. I don't care for your complaining re lack of 35oC days, the average February maximum is 25 - 26 degrees, yet 11 days exceeded 30 degrees including 2 days reaching/exceeding 35oC so therefore you have no reason to complain!
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Old 05-08-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by 你B View Post

I think these clowns would love Fort McMurray

[/font]
Reading that quote,
it sounds like the majority of Aussies (or at least the one's on the forums)
are Moderator cut: word removed that their ancestors left the British Isle's, and pine for it's doom-and-gloom...
*While ironically, most residents of the UK HATE their weather (this "unites them," sort of...) and is why southern Spain is full of Brits.



*You never answered my question as to if you'd prefer heat-hating Aussies to be replaced with heat lovers...
So what, you'd prefer Australia to just stay de-populated after all the cold-lovers leave?

Last edited by Jammie; 05-08-2009 at 07:10 PM.. Reason: word removed
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 5,491,787 times
Reputation: 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Reading that quote,


*You never answered my question as to if you'd prefer heat-hating Aussies to be replaced with heat lovers...
So what, you'd prefer Australia to just stay de-populated after all the cold-lovers leave?
We're overpopulated anyway so I'd be happy if we were to de-populate! Sitting on the freeway most hours during the day or going to the shopping center is an experience from hell.
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Old 05-09-2009, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by 你B View Post
We're overpopulated anyway so I'd be happy if we were to de-populate!
Sitting on the freeway most hours during the day or going to the shopping center is an experience from hell.
Australia as a country (imho) is "underpopulated."
Canada is somewhat small, and even we have almost 40 million people.

*The advantage of having a higher population is that both domestic and imported goods can become cheaper, through increased "supply-and-demand" and larger market size. Many of the same consumer goods in the U.S. cost 80% of what they do in Canada, even after considering the exchange rate, and before you pay ridiculous 13% sales tax. (American sales tax is often no higher than 8%)

** With a state or national population, governments can collect similar amounts of tax and provide the same services while collecting less tax-per-individual.

Melbourne might be overpopulated though, but that's unrelated to the stats for the population of your whole country.

The U.S.A. is largely filled with cities much smaller than cities in Canada, spread out with (comparatively) few traffic problems...
Just a higher number of smaller cities.

*Didn't you yourself complain that the northern half of Australia was too sparsely settled, and there are no "decent-sized" tropical cities?
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Old 05-15-2009, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Eastern Sydney, Australia
2,400 posts, read 2,615,014 times
Reputation: 1532
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Reading that quote,
it sounds like the majority of Aussies (or at least the one's on the forums)
are Moderator cut: word removed that their ancestors left the British Isle's, and pine for it's doom-and-gloom...
*While ironically, most residents of the UK HATE their weather (this "unites them," sort of...) and is why southern Spain is full of Brits.

*You never answered my question as to if you'd prefer heat-hating Aussies to be replaced with heat lovers...
So what, you'd prefer Australia to just stay de-populated after all the cold-lovers leave?
Really applies to the southern half of the country where rain and water supplies have been diminishing for years (dating back to mid nineties). Northern half is doing fine, they get a lot of rain and people aren't overtly concerned about water supplies.

Over WA, SA, Vic and Tas, wet, cold and cloudy autumn - winter weather used to be major features of the weather but not so much now. Climate (less wetter, more drier, more sunnier) has changed and several people are refusing/having trouble accepting the fact. Sure a month will have colder, wetter and cloudier weather than usual but this falls in the minority.

If heat-hating Aussies left then the country would be in serious trouble. Australia has a current population of around 21 million (89% of this are urbanised), the majority of the population live on the "Boomerang Coast" that runs from South-East Queensland (Sunshine Coast southwards) to Adelaide in South Australia. Perth is not part of this, it's right on the other side of the country and given the size of Australia is the most isolated city in the world. A lot of UK migrants move to Perth only to move to Sydney, Brisbane or Melbourne some years later as they find Perth too isolated and boring.

The lack of (significant) population in central/inland Australia, FNQ, NT and northern WA goes to show how much people don't like extreme heat, dryness and humidity. Tasmania and Victoria which have much colder temperatures and subjected to more variable weather have far more people than the above named "hot" areas.

Population by state (2008):

NSW: 7 million
Victoria: 5.3 million
Queensland (mostly in the southern half as well as coastal areas): 4.3 million
Western Australia: 2.1 million
South Australia: 1.6 million
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Old 05-15-2009, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 5,491,787 times
Reputation: 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post

*Didn't you yourself complain that the northern half of Australia was too sparsely settled, and there are no "decent-sized" tropical cities?
Yep, in the way that more and more people are crammed into a city which is buckling under the strain. If population is controlled, rather than opening the immigration floodgate, there'd be less of a problem.

The only towns in Tropical Australia large enough to be not be boring for a permanent resident are Darwin, Cairns and Townsville which offer many of the facilities found in larger cities.
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Old 05-15-2009, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by 你B View Post
Yep, in the way that more and more people are crammed into a city which is buckling under the strain. If population is controlled, rather than opening the immigration floodgate, there'd be less of a problem.

The only towns in Tropical Australia large enough to be not be boring for a permanent resident are Darwin, Cairns and Townsville which offer many of the facilities found in larger cities.
What about having more restrictions on moving to the southern cities, and less restrictions to the north?

I know that wouldn't make much sense, but in theory would you like that SAB?
*Then only immigrants willing to put up with 100+ days a year at 30+ C would make up the bulk of the new arrivals.
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Old 05-15-2009, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by koyaanisqatsi1 View Post
Really applies to the southern half of the country where rain and water supplies have been diminishing for years (dating back to mid nineties). Northern half is doing fine, they get a lot of rain and people aren't overtly concerned about water supplies.

Over WA, SA, Vic and Tas, wet, cold and cloudy autumn - winter weather used to be major features of the weather but not so much now. Climate (less wetter, more drier, more sunnier) has changed and several people are refusing/having trouble accepting the fact. Sure a month will have colder, wetter and cloudier weather than usual but this falls in the minority.

If heat-hating Aussies left then the country would be in serious trouble. Australia has a current population of around 21 million (89% of this are urbanised), the majority of the population live on the "Boomerang Coast" that runs from South-East Queensland (Sunshine Coast southwards) to Adelaide in South Australia. Perth is not part of this, it's right on the other side of the country and given the size of Australia is the most isolated city in the world. A lot of UK migrants move to Perth only to move to Sydney, Brisbane or Melbourne some years later as they find Perth too isolated and boring.

The lack of (significant) population in central/inland Australia, FNQ, NT and northern WA goes to show how much people don't like extreme heat, dryness and humidity. Tasmania and Victoria which have much colder temperatures and subjected to more variable weather have far more people than the above named "hot" areas.

Population by state (2008):

NSW: 7 million
Victoria: 5.3 million
Queensland (mostly in the southern half as well as coastal areas): 4.3 million
Western Australia: 2.1 million
South Australia: 1.6 million
Interesting perspective on the fact many temperate Australians are pretending that their climate isn't getting drier and sunnier.

So you're saying temperature preferences alone are the main reason the north is sparsely populated?
I would have assumed it was either too much drought or too many cyclones.

My temperature preferences could be summed up like this:
-I'd generally prefer a high of 42 C instead of a high of 12 C
-I'd generally prefer a high of 32 C instead of a high of 22 C.
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Old 05-15-2009, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 5,491,787 times
Reputation: 2836
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
What about having more restrictions on moving to the southern cities, and less restrictions to the north?
I know that wouldn't make much sense, but in theory would you like that SAB?
*Then only immigrants willing to put up with 100+ days a year at 30+ C would make up the bulk of the new arrivals. [/quote]
Nah, a nation-wide restriction weould be better. In Cairns, alot of signs and tourist guides are already bilingual (english-Japanese)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Interesting perspective on the fact many temperate Australians are pretending that their climate isn't getting drier and sunnier.
Go on the Aussie weather forums and all you'll see is hysteria over how "hot" and how "dry" the climate here is getting....which is ofcourse a load of bull.

Quote:
So you're saying temperature preferences alone are the main reason the north is sparsely populated?
Quote:

I would have assumed it was either too much drought or too many cyclones.

No, the early explorers simply set up colonies in the south rather than the north.
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