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Old 05-30-2009, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
Darwin is not bad, but if you want real heat, go to Wydham, in the Kimberely region of Western Australia...

Coldest month, July, has an average high of 31C, the hottest, November averages 39.5C....and the average number of days per year above 30C is 332.

Summer nights are hot aswell, you are guaranteed atleast 5 nights above 30C per year, and on average anytime between October and April inclusive averages an overnight low above 24C.

Average annual daily high is 35.6C, making it one of the hottest permanently inhabited locations in the world.

The high humidity experienced during the build up to the wet season...in Oct and Nov further enhances the heat index, but rain is unlikely as the ITCZ has yet to establish itself over the area. It's almost liek a cruel joke....temps are regularly exceeding 100F/38C, dewpoints 25C or more, but often no rain. The monsoon season starts in December, yet average daily highs remain in the 36C range throughout the summer monsoon season (Jan-mar) - and this period obviously coincides with the highest humdity - causing dewpoints well into the 25C range combined with the regular 33-40C temps; and on occasion dewpoints exceeding 29C.

This place makes Darwin look like a dogs *******s!

Wyndham climate:
Climate statistics for Australian locations

I know about Wyndham too.
I just think Darwin would be more "liveable" when you factor in things like this:

-how much a house will heat up indoors, especially with the heat of the sun
-the strain on kitchen appliances by not having room temps below 30 C,
- medications that will spoil when kept at 30 C
-evaporation and heat stress means most garden/yard plants have ridiculous watering needs.

All that said,
I myself could handle living outdoors year-round quite comfortably in Wyndham.

*If all my needs were taken care of for me,
I could probably handle highs at 43 C (109 F) with lows at 30 C, (86 F) year-round.

Last edited by ColdCanadian; 05-30-2009 at 03:08 PM..
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Old 05-30-2009, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
If you are looking for year-round comfortable temps--never hot, never cold--Antofagasta, Chile has an interesting climate. Summer temps average 64/night, 73/day and winter temps average 54/night, 63/day. There is virtually no rain ever (0.1 inch ave per year); it's pretty much permanently sunny. Highest recorded temp is 88 and the lowest recorded temp is 41. And it is right on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Nice!

Even though I'm a ‘Cold weather person,' I could certainly enjoy a place like that!
I've been there briefly, and I agree.
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Old 05-30-2009, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,434,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
If you are looking for year-round comfortable temps--never hot, never cold--Antofagasta, Chile has an interesting climate. Summer temps average 64/night, 73/day and winter temps average 54/night, 63/day. There is virtually no rain ever (0.1 inch ave per year); it's pretty much permanently sunny. Highest recorded temp is 88 and the lowest recorded temp is 41. And it is right on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Nice!

Even though I'm a ‘Cold weather person,' I could certainly enjoy a place like that!
I'm more of a "hot weather person" but that climate could be "adequate" for me.

I don't appreciate winter lows under 56 F, but with those averages it sounds like temps under 56 F are overall "not common."
At least with all that sunshine I could count on "perfect temperatures" in a greenhouse or in a car with the windows up.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Slightly off-topic but does anyone know how much the sun adds to the shade temperature? Say, instead of heat index, something like sun index? 73 F in the shade probably feels at least like 85 with the sun beating down on you. (Yes, I know it is not constant, with the greatest effect at noon and probably much less early in the morning and late in the afternoon). I know when I was in San Francisco, temperatures were generally in the high 60's during the day with a cool breeze but the intense sunshine made is comfortable enough for summer clothes.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:28 PM
 
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I think "best" is a loaded question, b/c it's all opinion. For mildest I'd have to say So Cal, though I think it's kind of bad, every day being about the same with very lil deviation.

My personal "best" is the sub tropical sweltering summers and mild winters of the South Eastern coastal US.

The craziest I'd have to say was in Spain where it was cold, hot, rained, hailed, all in one day. The worst had to be Iraq, where the "breeze" feels like someone is blowing a hairdryer in your face. I take that back, the cold of portland oregon and the everyday rain was pretty bad. I can deal w/ mid atlantic winters, but don't enjoy them. Anything North of DC is a no go , due cold/snow.

This is my opinion from my personal experiences.
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Old 05-30-2009, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
Slightly off-topic but does anyone know how much the sun adds to the shade temperature?
It probably depends on what surface you are talking about
(colour, glossy vs. mat finish, conductor vs. insulator, moisture content etc.)
and if there's any wind present.

For myself, I've felt warmer at 68 F with no wind standing in the sunshine on a clear day
as a 78 F with a strong wind, still standing in the (slightly diffused) sunshine on a partly cloudy day.

Also, no air movement vs. slightly air movement also makes a difference.
Sitting totally still in the sun on a 72 F, sunny and calm day has caused me to sweat as much as 92 F windy day in the sun would.
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Old 05-30-2009, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I'm more of a "hot weather person" but that climate could be "adequate" for me.

I don't appreciate winter lows under 56 F, but with those averages it sounds like temps under 56 F are overall "not common."
At least with all that sunshine I could count on "perfect temperatures" in a greenhouse or in a car with the windows up.
Going by the quoted averages, Antofogasta is dissapointingly cool for a place at 23º latitude. I wouldn't like to live there due to the not warm enough weather, and some rain is needed (preferably in the form of thunderstorms)
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Old 05-30-2009, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
Going by the quoted averages, Antofogasta is dissapointingly cool for a place at 23º latitude. I wouldn't like to live there due to the not warm enough weather, and some rain is needed (preferably in the form of thunderstorms)
<< The Australian continent is "disappointingly cool" for it's latitude, but I don't "hold it against Oz." >>

I'd take that in a heart beat over anything Canadian though.
The mildest climate I can find in Canada is one that's still unacceptable for bare fingers 5+ months of the year,
and that's only counting the daytime highs.

Antofagasta is a dramatic improvement;
no place in Canada has an annual average high even as "warm" as 16 C (61 F),
and Anto's winters are still warmer than that.

I can understand why you might not want to live there; it's almost exactly the same as Melbourne's average temps.
(plus with YOUR citizenship, there are plenty of better climates to choose from without leaving your country)

That said,
minus the fact that there is no heat, (inland there might be some )
I think you'd probably find Antofagasta more pleasant than Melbourne,
because of almost no rain or cloud cover.
*again, think of the "greenhouse" effect;
get a glass house and the sun could probably make it 40 C inside year-round if you want.
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Old 05-31-2009, 12:51 AM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
<< The Australian continent is "disappointingly cool" for it's latitude, but I don't "hold it against Oz." >>
At the end of the day, Oz is an island so its moderated by the ocean - even the deserts 1000km inland The inland northwest parts of the country would be extremely hot actually had they been under 100m above sea level, but most of the interoir is actually 400-700m in elevation.
This station: Paraburdoo, WA - January 2009 - Daily Weather Observations (http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/dwo/200901/html/IDCJDW6105.200901.shtml - broken link) is 423m above sea level, so you can imagine the heat if it were at say something like 50m.



Quote:
I'd take that in a heart beat over anything Canadian though.
The mildest climate I can find in Canada is one that's still unacceptable for bare fingers 5+ months of the year,
and that's only counting the daytime highs.

Antofagasta is a dramatic improvement;
no place in Canada has an annual average high even as "warm" as 16 C (61 F),
and Anto's winters are still warmer than that.

I can understand why you might not want to live there; it's almost exactly the same as Melbourne's average temps.
(plus with YOUR citizenship, there are plenty of better climates to choose from without leaving your country)

That said,
minus the fact that there is no heat, (inland there might be some )
I think you'd probably find Antofagasta more pleasant than Melbourne,
because of almost no rain or cloud cover.
*again, think of the "greenhouse" effect;
get a glass house and the sun could probably make it 40 C inside year-round if you want.
I'd probably take Antofogasta over Melbourne climate-wise, but being at 23º latitude and averaging 12/17C in winter and 19/24C in summer would be an insult.
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Old 05-31-2009, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,434,529 times
Reputation: 3247
Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
At the end of the day, Oz is an island so its moderated by the ocean - even the deserts 1000km inland The inland northwest parts of the country would be extremely hot actually had they been under 100m above sea level, but most of the interoir is actually 400-700m in elevation.
This station: Paraburdoo, WA - January 2009 - Daily Weather Observations (http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/dwo/200901/html/IDCJDW6105.200901.shtml - broken link) is 423m above sea level, so you can imagine the heat if it were at say something like 50m.




I'd probably take Antofogasta over Melbourne climate-wise, but being at 23º latitude and averaging 12/17C in winter and 19/24C in summer would be an insult.
I'm comparing it with North America; southern U.S. and central America.
(Oz has a noticeable difference for the averages, though the altitude explains some of the difference)

There's no comparison with Europe however,
go south of the 40th parallel in Europe and at low altitudes
you're "gauranteed" winters over 10 C, spring and fall over 20 C and summer over 30 C.
When you get as far south as southern Spain or Greece,
expect winter temps at 15+ C, and summer temps at 35+ C.
(and that's what, less than 35 degrees north?)
Then cross the Mediterranean to northern Africa,
expect winter highs around 20+ C, and summers around 40+ C.
(this is about 30 degrees north)


The only way I'd be insulted by Antofagasta's "temperatures vs. latitude"
would be if I was getting sunburnt too often on days that I was "not warm."
*Occaisionally that has happened in southern Ontario for me,
but that could have been avoided with proper (and timely) use of sunscreen.
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