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Old 09-22-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Airports all over the world
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
My weather book has 9 places in Alaska that has higher average high temps in January than Minneapolis MN.
Uh, we need to keep quiet on this. We spend a lot of money making people believe Alaska is cold in the winter time.
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Old 09-22-2009, 08:43 AM
 
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That's probably the thing I hate most about the north
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:19 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Once the leaves have fallen, we get in the car and drive south until everything is green again.
It's not ugly if there is a blanket of white as a backdrop to the skeletons but that is not a constant during the winter.
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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It seems that for a lot of people, when the trees are bare, they can't get passed the trees themselves.
For me, once the trees become bare, they go from being "foreground" to "semi-background."

I still don't like the "look" of bare trees on a dark overcast day, ()
but there is a different kind of beauty on a sunny day (or moonlit night ) for me,
as each branch casts its own sharp, contorted silhouette, it can illuminate interesting patterns in the bark,
plus at the same time you get a better glimse of the horizon behind.

I suppose another reason I appreciate deciduous trees even when they're bare is that they will still cut down wind.
When it's cold, windy and sunny, often it feels warmer in a deciduous forest that's bare of leaves,
because even though the sun intensity is a little lower, the wind might be a lot calmer.
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Old 09-23-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Wyandotte, MI
364 posts, read 756,980 times
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I actually love the look of bare trees (I like trees in all seasons).

Trees in southeast MI are bare from about late Oct/early Nov until late Apr/early May, so basically 6 months bare, 1 month color, 5 months green.

When trees are bare, you get to see the beauty of the pine/spruce/fir trees mixed in (whereas often times they blend in during the summer). Also the shape of the trees looks more defined. And as someone else said, November is a very dark, cloudy time here in the Great Lakes, and snows dont usually last long until December, so while you will get the occasional snowy November day and the occasional sunny day, much of November has a bare, dark look. While it depresses some people, I actually enjoy it...its sort of a prelude to winter.
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Old 09-23-2009, 10:04 PM
 
Location: IN
20,098 posts, read 34,319,253 times
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Bare trees are a fact of life from late October until late April in NH.
To compensate for the bareness of the deciduous trees I plant many different types of coniferous trees close to the house to add greenery year round. The best ones to plant closest to the house are balsam fir and white spruce. Both trees are very cylindrical and are storm resistant.
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Old 09-24-2009, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Bare trees are a fact of life from late October until late April in NH.
To compensate for the bareness of the deciduous trees I plant many different types of coniferous trees close to the house to add greenery year round. The best ones to plant closest to the house are balsam fir and white spruce. Both trees are very cylindrical and are storm resistant.
I'm surprised that you don't appreciate the look of bare trees.
(you seemed to like "all-things northern")

Is it more about "cutting down the sun" for you?
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Old 09-24-2009, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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I like bare trees that let sunshine in on a cold winter day. Then provide shade in the heat of summer.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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I like bare trees because that means it's probably not hot outside. Even though green trees are beautiful, I actually dread seeing those little green buds in Spring, because I know it's about to get hot for the next 6+ months. This is also why I prefer cloudy days to sunny ones. Sun means heat, and even in the winter I prefer it cloudy. However, I prefer the sky to be cloudless at night so I can see the stars. My ideal summer would be one that is never sunny during the day, but always clear at night. Actually, that would be my ideal winter, too, except I may throw in a few sunny days just for variety.

This makes me happy:


And this doesn't:
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Old 09-25-2009, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,792,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I like bare trees because that means it's probably not hot outside. Even though green trees are beautiful, I actually dread seeing those little green buds in Spring, because I know it's about to get hot for the next 6+ months. This is also why I prefer cloudy days to sunny ones. Sun means heat, and even in the winter I prefer it cloudy. However, I prefer the sky to be cloudless at night so I can see the stars. My ideal summer would be one that is never sunny during the day, but always clear at night. Actually, that would be my ideal winter, too, except I may throw in a few sunny days just for variety.
Interesting pictures.
Again, we are opposites for comfort requirements;
I need sun warmth below 65 F.

Another interesting point to bare trees is it's easier to watch birds and other critters.

The only place I can think of that might be cool and cloudy in the day, maybe clear at night
is the coastal deserts in western South America. They get a lot of fog. I wonder if it clears at night?
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