U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-31-2010, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
1,793 posts, read 1,324,052 times
Reputation: 1284

Advertisements

Which do you like better?

PA gets a good bit of rain and humidity. The drawbacks are a cold, dreary fall and winter. But spring and summer are spectacular because the rain makes everything so green.

I have never lived in a dry climate. I am not sure whether I would want to live out West or not (CO, Utah, AZ). I think the fall and winter would be much sunnier and less depressing. But I think the spring and summer would be dry and less beautiful. And some of those places (CO, Utah) don't even seem like they get a summer. Low temps are pretty chilly all times of the year it seems like.

Not sure if my impressions are correct or not, but I just thought it was interesting to see whether people liked dry or wet climates better. I think I would prefer a humid climate overall, and would miss the green if i lived out west. Although when its rainy and freezing cold in the winter in PA, sometimes I wish i lived in a sunnier climate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,420,854 times
Reputation: 3247
An advantage to dryness is that temperature differences are noticed less.

After visiting New Orleans, I think I have a preference for afternoon humidity under 70%. At moderate temps like 68 F, it's easy to feel slightly-overheated one moment and slightly-chilled the next, with no "in-between." I also discovered that Toronto's average afternoon humidity goes up in wintertime into the 70%'s as well. I would probably prefer a climate with moderately-humid (under 60%) or moderately-dry (above 40%) average annual afternoon humidity.

Toronto's annual average is 63% humidity, but that's because our winter humidity is so high.
Our entire growing season has average afternoon humidities in the 50% range.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:23 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,711,369 times
Reputation: 1358
I much rather live in a dryer climate. The humidity never bothered me until I had moved to a dryer climate and now it`s hard to go back to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 03:24 PM
 
3,062 posts, read 4,154,715 times
Reputation: 3171
Default I'll take humid

I have lived in both - in Alberta (VERY dry) and on the east coast of Canada (and now in the UK) - humid.

ColdCanadian is correct that you feel the temperatures less in a dry climate: -30C in Alberta didn't feel as cold to me as -6C in Halifax - the humidity makes the cold go right to your bones. The heat in summer is the opposite - dry heat is nicer as you can prespire and cool off - when the weather is humid and hot you have a much more difficult time cooling off.

Despite that, I prefer the humid climate for a number of reasons: I find it WAY easier to breathe in higher humidity, my skin feels and looks nicer in higher humidity and my contact lenses aren't stuck to my eyeballs. Also, I love to garden and in my experience, plants grow better in a humid environment and the need to water is greatly reduced.

PS. People with aching bones swear by the dry climate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 04:12 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 6,263,456 times
Reputation: 8127
To me, the choice for re-location boils down to green vs brown ( cuz that is usually the choice you have to make)

I don't like humidity, but since I'll go with green oner brown, humidity goes with the territory.

I could settle for a brown/dry climate in the winter months,though.
When it's cold and everything buried in snow, there isn't much green to be seen anyway.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Subarctic Mountain Climate in England
2,918 posts, read 1,007,600 times
Reputation: 3952
When it's cold = dry is better. When it's hot, humid please.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
7,786 posts, read 6,350,653 times
Reputation: 10435
I'll take the humid overall but I agree with Richard damp cold bothers me more than dry cold.

I haven't lived in a dry climate but I found I had more sinus issues, headaches, etc. when I visited places like Arizona, Colorado, Las Vegas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 06:48 PM
 
727 posts, read 841,076 times
Reputation: 634
I'm lucky enough to live in an area that gets both.....

Our winter time climate is legendary for its consistant rain, clouds, fog and gloom. We Oregonians have to move to keep the mildew away. Moss grows on our north sides. A rare day will see the relative humidity drop under 90 percent and even when the sun is out and the temperature creeps into the 50's (10+ in metric), the chill cuts to the bone. All else being equal, 40 degrees in the Willamette Valley is "colder" than the 25 I endured growing up in southern New York. And just when it seems we can't tolerate another day of this kwap....

....We transition into our dryer summer pattern. Temperatures slowly climb and we get more and longer sun breaks. Relative humidity starts dropping; the clouds burn off - or don't even bother to appear - and we start enjoying our three to five months of sun and warmth. In the height of our summer humidity can (rarely) drop into single digits. I've seen the temperature stand at 95 (35) with dew points near 0 and have been perfectly comfortable fully dressed; 104 (40) is "cooler" here than 94 back in New York and in much of the eastern half of the nation. And once every third or fourth year we can go through the entire months of July and August and see no measurable rainfall.

But even this can get old and by late September when the vegetation is worn out, the air is full of dust from wind blown soil and we look bleakly at our brown suede lawns, the clouds start rolling in again and the rains we learned to hate in early April are now welcome once again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 4,655,661 times
Reputation: 1919
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpfan921 View Post
Which do you like better?

I think I would prefer a humid climate overall, and would miss the green if i lived out west. Although when its rainy and freezing cold in the winter in PA, sometimes I wish i lived in a sunnier climate.
You’re not alone in this tug of war: I think most people would prefer a green landscape and sunny skies most often…but they just don’t seem to go together. I have spent some time in the dry western USA climates…and the brown landscape indeed gets depressing at times. It seems that a climate with humidity/green/and rain is like the tropics - the cradle of life. I too prefer a humid climate with as much sun as possible.

Here is a map of average number of hours of sun in December…the cloudiest month of the year on average. If you think Philly is bad in December for example (136 hours), you would never make it in a place like Cleveland, Erie, eastern MI, or the cities of the Pacific NW (Portland, Seattle, Vancouver…etc) which get less than 80 hours of sunshine in December on average. You might be able to find what you are looking for by moving closer to the Atlantic Coast and further south (humid/green with more sun in winter). You can see that cities like Raleigh, NC, Jacksonville, FL, Myrtle Beach/Charleston, SC, Virginia Beach…etc all average significantly more sun in winter than the Philly area. It’s hard to imagine, but even states/cities just to the east of Philly like New Jersey or Delaware get noticeable more sun in winter than PA. I think even far eastern PA is still just a bit too close to the Great Lakes to get the sun in winter. The Atlantic coast and points south might be better for you if you want humid/green with more sun.







.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 2,850,646 times
Reputation: 1648
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
An advantage to dryness is that temperature differences are noticed less.
That is true but temperatures are more stable in more humid climates. There is a reason why Phoenix is much hotter than Miami in the summer even though the latter is closer to the equator. Drier climates also typically have large differences between day an night temps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top