U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 11:38 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
10,208 posts, read 4,680,633 times
Reputation: 4698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post

Fresh air isn't a problem in Invercargill, with the next gale never been too far away. Water quality is becoming an issue with the dairy boom. I wouldn't call the climate there sickening, but I can remember feeling as though spring had become autumn/fall without summer in between ,on some years

I personally wouldn't call it sickening. Looks heavenly to me. Good to hear about the fresh air. About fifteen minutes from my home, there's fields of onions and the odor in the area can be unpleasant at times (not only ruins perfectly good meals, but also the air! )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 02-01-2011, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
4,148 posts, read 2,823,601 times
Reputation: 2204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
Very much the case. Invercargill is a "big sky" town. The {relatively}long summer twilight can make for some great evenings at the beach, with half the town seeming to be there.


Fresh air isn't a problem in Invercargill, with the next gale never been too far away. Water quality is becoming an issue with the dairy boom. I wouldn't call the climate there sickening, but I can remember feeling as though spring had become autumn/fall without summer in between ,on some years
Roughly how long is the summer twilight then, just out of interest? London's not particularly good but up north at 54N the midsummer sun sets about 9.45pm, 30 minutes later (on a clear evening) you can just about still play golf or read outside, and an extra 30 minutes later about 30% of the sky or so is still mostly blue. There's about a two-week window where a clear night will mean there's always a small 1% blue tinge on the horizon even at 1am, so it never gets completely dark. You only have to go as far north as Scotland to get proper summer twilight lasting all night.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
3,948 posts, read 2,401,298 times
Reputation: 1629
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
You don't say! Don't take this the wrong way, but Wellington is a hellhole (worse than ChCh!) and you're not getting any younger. If I were you I'd be heading to Perth (or wherever suits your preference) post-haste. It's a tragic thing to be stuck in a subarctic dump like Wellington when there are countless warm, sunny climes in the world that would be very hospitable to a man of means, such as yourself (presumably). Family and friends is a flimsy excuse -- frequency of warm, sunny weather trumps every other consideration!


Bear in mind that our standards of warmth are relative to Western (in the cultural sense, not the literal sense) nations. In other words, countries populated predominately by Caucasians, who generally inhabit the higher latitudes (and have done for most of recorded history). Hence, Westerners would generally regard Paris, Christchurch and Seattle as average; Edmonton, Anchorage and Helsinki as cool; and Seville, Los Angeles and Sydney as warm. Given that the world's population tends to be centered in the tropics and subtropics, the climates we would consider 'warm' would be considered 'average' or even 'cool' by most of the world's population.
Sorry to disappoint, but despite my preferences I don't feel I'm living in a hellhole - as I said, I spent years in worse. Climate aside, Wellington is very nice in general - and my property is sheltered from the southerly quarter. The prevailing northerly/NW directions only trouble it when the winds are very strong. I'd also remind you that I've said warmth is not as important to me as sunshine - which is why, for example, I'm happy to spend time in the Mackenzie or Central Otago in a spell of settled weather, even if maxima are barely pushing 15-16C. I didn't say anything about family and friends. I do of course make the most of any holidays spent in warm, sunny locations - and as I've mentioned before, 3.5 weeks of almost continuous sunshine in Brazil during the SH winter was very acceptable indeed.

I called Sydney "moderately warm" on a global basis, as I said. I'm well aware of the other perspectives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
3,948 posts, read 2,401,298 times
Reputation: 1629
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Roughly how long is the summer twilight then, just out of interest? London's not particularly good but up north at 54N the midsummer sun sets about 9.45pm, 30 minutes later (on a clear evening) you can just about still play golf or read outside, and an extra 30 minutes later about 30% of the sky or so is still mostly blue. There's about a two-week window where a clear night will mean there's always a small 1% blue tinge on the horizon even at 1am, so it never gets completely dark. You only have to go as far north as Scotland to get proper summer twilight lasting all night.
You must also bear in mind time zones and daylight saving. Invercargill is well west of central NZ, and with our standard time at GMT+12, daylight time at GMT+13, the summer sunsets are quite late - 9.42 in the first few days of this January. At the extreme point of the time eqatiopn around February 11, solar zenith is at 2.01pm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
22,745 posts, read 9,821,529 times
Reputation: 6784
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Roughly how long is the summer twilight then, just out of interest? London's not particularly good but up north at 54N the midsummer sun sets about 9.45pm, 30 minutes later (on a clear evening) you can just about still play golf or read outside, and an extra 30 minutes later about 30% of the sky or so is still mostly blue. There's about a two-week window where a clear night will mean there's always a small 1% blue tinge on the horizon even at 1am, so it never gets completely dark. You only have to go as far north as Scotland to get proper summer twilight lasting all night.
I think London's is fairly good. If you're from 40 latitude it's a big difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 05:31 PM
 
2,355 posts, read 5,976,784 times
Reputation: 974
The relentless winter continues with no end in sight. If we have another winter like this Ill probably switch from filling my yard full of "tropicalesque" and broad leaf evergreens to ultra hardy edible plants. Fruits and berries here we come!

By far, this is the worst winter since 2005 in Syracuse, NY. Could exceed 2004 2005 if this extremely bitter cold continues another couple weeks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-01-2011, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
371 posts, read 277,924 times
Reputation: 172
Mad that we had to go to school. Icy roads (which will usually get you out of school in Texas) with a low of 14 and high of 25 degrees today. I don't think school was canceled because there was a big basketball game scheduled for tonight against our #1 rival.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-02-2011, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
2,560 posts, read 1,503,150 times
Reputation: 1254
Here is our temp profile for today:



It reached about 32 C / 90 F around 11 AM, but then the southerly change came through and ruined everything! The temp stayed around 21 C / 70 F for most of the afternoon.

That's why looking at the highs here gives the impression that the weather is much warmer than it really is. The high might be over 30 C, but the warmth tends to occur as a 'spike' where it will rise up from, say, 20 C to 30 C and then back down again within an hour or two. Nearly all of our 'hot' days are like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-02-2011, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
813 posts, read 537,321 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
Here is our temp profile for today:



It reached about 32 C / 90 F around 11 AM, but then the southerly change came through and ruined everything! The temp stayed around 21 C / 70 F for most of the afternoon.

That's why looking at the highs here gives the impression that the weather is much warmer than it really is. The high might be over 30 C, but the warmth tends to occur as a 'spike' where it will rise up from, say, 20 C to 30 C and then back down again within an hour or two. Nearly all of our 'hot' days are like that.
Yesterday was like that here dropping 10C in 10 mins. (Although that was from 39C to 29C and the temp was above 30C from 730am through till 250pm).

Maybe not the best example for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 02-02-2011, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
813 posts, read 537,321 times
Reputation: 424
Have a couple of mates in FNQ. Stay safe guys!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:00 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top