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Old 01-04-2011, 12:10 AM
 
Location: motueka nz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
^^
Isn't there two conflicting definitions or at least connotations of "temperate" -- one that seems to imply mildness (maritime or oceanic-like) and one that implies continentality (or having four seasons)?
From talking to different people it seems to be a relative term, although the UK and much of NZ would both be maritime cool temperate to most people (I would think). At the same time, I think of here as having a four season climate with a small annual range (10C), although that may seem ridiculous to someone from a climate with a far greater seasonal range.

As for NH vs SH, I would prefer the SH for the milder climates and the clearer skies(here at least). Plenty of places in the NH I could live happily though, as long as its coastal and not too cold/grey......, and has mountains with snow nearby.
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Old 01-04-2011, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - Porto Alegre

Not particularly low imho.
Dec = 85/65 F Jan = 88/67 F Feb = 88/68 F

It's diurnal range in summer is characteristic of southeastern US cities that aren't in coastal areas.
Perhaps it doesn't get much of a sea breeze at night?
Clearing skies at night?
You're right about the Southern US; I guess maybe seeing 31C/19C and most lows below 19C made it seem cool at night to me.

A place like Mobile, Alabama could be a match though Mobile's still somewhat more continental.
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Old 01-04-2011, 01:45 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The biggest difference I noticed the mild climates in the Northern Hemisphere are Mediterranean climates, while in the southern hemisphere humid subtropical climates can be mild, too. (I'll call a climate mild if it has winter highs in the mid 50s and infrequent frosts and the mean of the warmest month below 75°F or so).

Cities like Montevideo, Sydney, Auckland, Porto Alegre (rather hot but still mild in the summer compared to say, Florida or even the Carolinas) have no real counterpart in the Northern Hemisphere.
I'd say Great Britain is pretty darn temperate for it's latitude. Places in the southern hemisphere at the same latitude are indeed COLDER in the winter months, like Puntas Arenas or Macquarie Island.
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Old 01-04-2011, 01:47 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 18,980,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
You're right about the Southern US; I guess maybe seeing 31C/19C and most lows below 19C made it seem cool at night to me.

A place like Mobile, Alabama could be a match though Mobile's still somewhat more continental.
Mobile is more like 23-24/32C.
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Old 01-04-2011, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - Porto Alegre

Not particularly low imho.
Dec = 85/65 F Jan = 88/67 F Feb = 88/68 F

It's diurnal range in summer is characteristic of southeastern US cities that aren't in coastal areas.
Perhaps it doesn't get much of a sea breeze at night?
Clearing skies at night?
Looks like a wetter version of L.A.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 4,655,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Northern hemisphere:

-warmest avg SST's in places like Caribbean, the Red Sea and Gulf Stream
-higher average summer temps for a given latitude
-lower summer UV for a given latitude (because the air is dirtier )

Hard to say because there aren't many climates in the southern hemisphere.
I picture feeling "chilled and sunburnt" in a lot of southern hemisphere climates.
That would be my take too I guess:

While the southern Hemisphere has milder winters north of around 25 latitude…the cool summers are a huge negative. Also, once you get much south of 35 latitude in the northern Hemisphere cold weather is truly fleeting anyway. So you really lose if you like warm weather I think. Many people who live south of 40 latitude in the northern Hemisphere (USA, China, Southern Europe, North Africa…etc) would consider the mean summer temps in many southern hem cities has “not a real summer”. With the exception of parts of Australia and a few other places (Rio, Buenos Aries…etc) there are few really warm/hot climates in the southern hemisphere.

As far as SST…yes those 32 C waters in the Caribbean, Red Sea, Gulf of Thailand…etc are a far cry from the cold and stormy Pacific.
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Old 01-04-2011, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Deneb said coldest in a CITY.

Australia beat's NZ, Charlotte Pass to -23C, but in reality I'm sure NZ has got colder since it's got higher mountains. They don't have any station above about 2000 metres I believe.

The Northern Hemisphere has mild climates like California, Morocco, and Western Europe too.
As in the case with the word "temperate", I'm afraid that the word "city" has different connotations in different places. Where do you draw the line? Punta Arenas has approx. 120,000 inhabitants. I suppose you consider that a city. In that case, I still find 5F very high to be considered a coldest temperature EVER in a SH city (particularly in South America). In Argentina, the city of San Carlos de Bariloche (110,000 inhabitans, some sources say more), as recently as 2007 recorded -18.8C (-1.84F). In that city, the coldest ever recorded was -21,1C (-5.98F) in 1963.

So, even if we consider that Sarmiento (with 8,000 inhab and with a weather station) is not a city, 5F (Punta Arenas) is not the coldest temp ever recorded in a SH CITY.
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Old 01-04-2011, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
If I had to live in a "temperate" climate,
a lot of the southern hemisphere temperate climates look better;
gardening is possible year-round in most locations.

Plus at the borderline of "sub-tropical" vs. "temperate"
sometimes what passes as sub-tropical in the northern hemisphere is considered temperate.
I wouldn't be surprised if Johannesburg, Cape Town and Buenos Aires are considered temperate.
Yes, You're right. I'm from Buenos Aires, and we call our climate "Templado Pampeano", which means "Temperate of the Pampas". We call our climates in the north of Argentina "Subtropical" (places like the Iguazu Falls). From my oint of view, names are just names. They are useful in some respects but they are misleading in others. It's better to know the numbers (temperature, rainfall, humidity, etc.).

Cheers,
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Old 01-04-2011, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Mobile is more like 23-24/32C.
The comment was concerning diurnal range...

Here's an example of what I meant:

Average Weather for Summerville, SC - Temperature and Precipitation
Summerville, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Summerville SC is about 20-30 km inland from any salt water.
Mobile while not on the immediate coast is on the massive Mobile Bay.
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Old 01-04-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: motueka nz
504 posts, read 480,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Deneb said coldest in a CITY.

Australia beat's NZ, Charlotte Pass to -23C, but in reality I'm sure NZ has got colder since it's got higher mountains. They don't have any station above about 2000 metres I believe.

The Northern Hemisphere has mild climates like California, Morocco, and Western Europe too.
The coldest recorded place in NZ (Ophir) is at a modest 300m ASL, Charlottes Pass is about 1800m ASL. It's possible that there are colder places outside of alpine climates. The coldest temp I've seen in the NZ mountains was -25C at 2100m ASL , using a hand held digital thermometer. At other times I've seen the valleys colder than the summits, due to an inversion.
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