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Old 07-22-2011, 04:27 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
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There are several homes in the photos that you can see are in solid, good condition.
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Old 07-22-2011, 07:54 AM
 
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One of them is actually in exellent condition. Most of them are quite repairable.
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Old 02-13-2012, 08:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
If those buildings were 200 miles south Charleston would have declared them historical monuments and pumped them so full of cash they would be preserved for at least 1000 years. Unfortunately for Wheeling it is in Northern WV, which is a no-go area when it comes to funding. Wheeling cant afford to keep those structures because all the funding goes to the southern half of the state.
It's such a shame! If only [in the past] Wheeling had been able to get a grant or funding of some sort to fix up these buildings, they could be as good as new now! Maybe even, if they were fixed up enough, tourist attractions that would bring more people to the city, too. It's so sad. If what the photographer said is true - some of the buildings are pre-Civil-war - they are (or were) a major part of Wheeling's history and culture! If only they could be saved! I guess they COULD be saved, if it was possible to get more funding than they would've needed to restore the buildings ten years ago. Because now they are so damaged...
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Old 02-13-2012, 08:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
One of them is actually in exellent condition. Most of them are quite repairable.
I agree with that! The biggest problems with the buildings, from an outside view, seem the broken windows, sagging steps, and muddy bricks. All things that can easily be repaired! We DON'T know what the insides look like, though...
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Old 02-13-2012, 08:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
There are several homes in the photos that you can see are in solid, good condition.
Those are the ones that make me say, "Why the heck are they tearing all these down? Plenty of them would be easy repairs!" I mean, there's got to be SOME people in the city who are willing to donate a few hundred dollars to fix some broken windows! I know, I know, lots of them need more than that, but some of the buildings that were photographed were in near-perfect condition for such old buildings.
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Old 02-13-2012, 08:10 AM
 
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How many of these buildings are they tearing down? Entire blocks at a time? Because the buildings are so close together - either ACTUALLY connected with another building or a few feet away from it -wouldn't it be difficult to tear down one damaged, old building, but keep the building next to it standing?
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
If those buildings were 200 miles south Charleston would have declared them historical monuments and pumped them so full of cash they would be preserved for at least 1000 years. Unfortunately for Wheeling it is in Northern WV, which is a no-go area when it comes to funding. Wheeling cant afford to keep those structures because all the funding goes to the southern half of the state.
A little more background here. I am originally from Wheeling and once owned rental properties there. The real problem is city government. Unfortunately, in Wheeling, the city employees have gotten the upper hand and they actually run the town, politics and all. Wheeling is the only place in the country, for example, where the police chief is limited in how he can deploy his cops by an incredibly stupid law that mandates two cops per cruiser no matter the place or circumstances.

It has not been all that long ago (25 years or so) since the buildings in question were in good condition and most of them beautiful historic structures. Wheeling is absolutely full of beautiful Victorian archetecture,
easily the largest collection in the state since it was an old money industrial town. The problems started when several factories closed and production moved to cheap labor countries. the town lost tens of thousands in population in less than 3 decades.

The problem was further exacorbated when the feel good contingent that ran the city's housing authority decided it was unfair to have taxpayer subsidized public housing that concentrated low income people in one place, so they forced the residents (most of whom were perfectly content living there) out of those structures and tore them down. Those people were dispersed to other parts of town... not where the elitists lived who made the decision in the first place (they would have never tolerated that, fair minded folks that they were) but to middle class neighborhoods where they could blend in harmoniously with other deserving non elite groups.

The mixture was not as harmonious as the out the pike folks had predicted. You see, unbeknownst to the rich folks, the Vinyard Hills group had different cultural norms and habits than the middle/working class people and a sort of culture conflict began to manifest itself. Suprise, suprise. These people did not take too well to drug dealers and hookers suddenly appearing in their midst and when the Vinyard kids exhibited a somewhat more violent character than they wanted around their own children, those who had not already left to find work elsewhere started to bail out on the communities.
Structures that are left vacant soon start to look like some of those in the photos.

But, not to fear, the rich folks calling the shots decided they would replace the urban decay they had caused, the newly distressed Victorians, with new, fake Victorians which they would use middle class financed money to turn another neighborhood over to the displaced Vinyard folks. On the backs of ordinary taxpayers, many were moved into brand new fake reproductions that were no way the quality of the ones being replaced, but were of the typical modern particle board with vaneer found today. That was even worse than it would have been if they had taken funds and restored the real Victorians and moved the welfare folks into them because at least in that manner some of the history would have been preserved.

East Wheeling was once mostly an ethnic Italian neighborhood, and it retained much of that character right through the 1960s. The homes were originally built by German immigrants in the 1800s, but in the early 1900s the Italians moved into them over time when they moved to the area to work in the factories. Those folks happily maintained the structures in good condition for several decades.

Now the city fathers want to displace the few remaining folks and turn what remains of a historic neighborhood into a large playground. I say what remains, because they have already destroyed most of the neighborhood over time and turned it into parking lots and government buildings. It is a sad exercise in mass stupidity, but I think it is too far along to stop.
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Old 02-13-2012, 03:16 PM
 
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There is one other thing that needs to be mentioned here. The Diocese wants the playground built. That way their schools, which happen to be located nearby, will have full use of it and they won't have to cough up any money for the construction. That is not anybody's official position, but everyone knows this to be the case. In Wheeling, the Bishop is a very powerful man.
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:56 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 4,239,611 times
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Is their an effort to save these historic houses?
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Old 02-14-2012, 01:52 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Is their an effort to save these historic houses?
Yes, there was a lawsuit against the city filed by homeowners (Poynton VS. Wheeling), but the city won, and the buildings are currently scheduled to be torn down.
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