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Old 11-12-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Western Pennsylvania
2,429 posts, read 6,825,239 times
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The Winter 2011 issue of Classic Trains Magazine has two articles about railroading in West Virginia.

The first is a six page spread, with many B&W photos, of the Buffalo Creek and Gauley, the Mann's Creek Railway, and the Nicholas, Fayette and Greenbrier railroads in 1948.

A second article, immediately following the first, is "Riding through the Mountain State", an overview of the various tourist roads in present day WV. This two page article discusses the Cass Scenic Railroad, the various Durbin & Greenbrier Valley operations, the Potomac Eagle, and the New River Train, a once-a-year excursion from Huntington to Hinton every October.

While there are a few thumbnails of the magazine pages online, you'll have to buy the magazine ($6.95) at your favorite newsstand to be able to read the actual articles.
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Old 11-13-2011, 01:42 PM
 
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Railroads were an integral part of American life right up until the 1970s when the Teamsters Union managed to push trucking to the forefront. That, along with the demise of our industrial base that accompanied the elitist "globalization" of our society pushed trains very much to the back burner.

When I was young, the heavily industrial Northern Panhandle was absolutely awash with trains... coal, steel manufactured goods, and passenger all filled the railways. Towns with major intersections along rail lines such as Wheeling were bustling with commerce, and Huntington, whose history is repleat with railroad lore, was a huge factor in that industry. Those were the days.
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Old 11-13-2011, 05:04 PM
 
6,347 posts, read 9,135,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
Railroads were an integral part of American life right up until the 1970s when the Teamsters Union managed to push trucking to the forefront. That, along with the demise of our industrial base that accompanied the elitist "globalization" of our society pushed trains very much to the back burner.

When I was young, the heavily industrial Northern Panhandle was absolutely awash with trains... coal, steel manufactured goods, and passenger all filled the railways. Towns with major intersections along rail lines such as Wheeling were bustling with commerce, and Huntington, whose history is repleat with railroad lore, was a huge factor in that industry. Those were the days.
With energy prices going up, and congested roads trains are making a comeback. The US has the best freight rail network in the country, but public transportation by rail is terrible. There needs to be separate lines for high speed public transit, and continued improvements on America's great freight network.
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Old 11-13-2011, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Winfield, WV
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Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
With energy prices going up, and congested roads trains are making a comeback. The US has the best freight rail network in the country, but public transportation by rail is terrible. There needs to be separate lines for high speed public transit, and continued improvements on America's great freight network.
I totally agree.
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Old 11-14-2011, 06:51 AM
 
Location: 304
5,327 posts, read 7,667,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
With energy prices going up, and congested roads trains are making a comeback. The US has the best freight rail network in the country, but public transportation by rail is terrible. There needs to be separate lines for high speed public transit, and continued improvements on America's great freight network.
There are tons of lines that sit un used all over the country. Maybe bridge work would be needed, but other than that it wouldn't be hard to rehab old lines for new use.
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Old 11-14-2011, 10:03 AM
 
6,347 posts, read 9,135,604 times
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Originally Posted by Chriscross309 View Post
There are tons of lines that sit un used all over the country. Maybe bridge work would be needed, but other than that it wouldn't be hard to rehab old lines for new use.
The problem is the older lines are not built for high speeds. For transportation purposes, of people, they are slow. For freight it doesnt matter so much, but for personal transit it does.
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