U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > West Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-28-2012, 06:03 PM
 
Location: White Sox Territory
404 posts, read 460,914 times
Reputation: 143

Advertisements

I was looking at West Virginias boundaries the other day and it seems to have two panhandles that jut into other states. The first one juts in between ohio and pennsylvania and the other one almost splits Maryland into two. Anyone know the reason for these panhandles?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-28-2012, 07:02 PM
rfp
 
337 posts, read 549,324 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Planner15 View Post
I was looking at West Virginias boundaries the other day and it seems to have two panhandles that jut into other states. The first one juts in between ohio and pennsylvania and the other one almost splits Maryland into two. Anyone know the reason for these panhandles?
At the time when WV separated from Virginia during the War between the States, the eastern panhandle was extended eastward so that the B&O RR would remain in Union territory if the Confederates won the war. The B&O tracks are in WV from Harpers Ferry to Cumberland, probably because the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal had previously laid claim to Maryland's north bank of the Potomac River in what is very rugged country.

The management of the B&O was pro-Union at the time, and earned a good amount of money ferrying Union troops and supplies during the war. The B&O RR was one of three major east-west railroads in the US at the time, the other two being the Pennsylvania and the New York Central.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-29-2012, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Huntington, WV
4,153 posts, read 6,856,801 times
Reputation: 768
How The States Got Their Shapes — How West Virginia Got Its Shape — Full Episodes & Video Online — H2 on History.com

West Virginia breaks away | Lynn Garthwaite, Author
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-29-2012, 04:07 PM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
10,279 posts, read 10,388,952 times
Reputation: 6938
I'm pretty sure there is some information on Bobilee's web page:

https://sites.google.com/site/wvotherhistory/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-29-2012, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,300 posts, read 2,644,035 times
Reputation: 1404
Up pops the Devil

The History Channel is quite incorrect. They try to correct one myth and then perpetuate another. The boundaries of the state are totally arbitrary, they are not based on anything other than what the Wheeling government thought they could get away with. I've read a good deal of the Constitutional Convention minutes and they are a great disillusion to anyone who believes the commonly held beliefs of West Virginia statehood. There are some chilling moments, as when founding father Peter van Winkle says that the people inhabiting counties like Greenbrier and Monroe
"must be exterminated by exile or death, or remain where they are. But in either case, sir, we want the territory. If they are going to remain upon it, still we want it."

It is amusing that the History Channel thinks that Berkeley and Jefferson counties are somehow different than most of the other counties included in the new state. Pocahontas, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Greenbrier, McDowell, Mercer and Monroe counties never participated in any of the Wheeling initiatives, yet here they are.

The other great myth is that West Virginians had wanted their own state for decades, this is total b.s. Pierpont even told Lincoln "the Union men of West Va were not originally for the Union because of the new state." That telegram is in the Library of Congress, so "pop" goes another myth. Statehood was entirely a private enterprise by the Wheeling government that was sold as a war effort.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2012, 06:33 PM
 
9,402 posts, read 11,466,883 times
Reputation: 1507
At the time, nearly all the industry in the state was focused in and around Wheeling. That city was on the B&O and PA railroads, as well as the National Road and was a hub for commerce and transport. Some of those historical companies only recently shut down... the LaBelle Nail Works, Marsh Wheeling Stogies to name a couple.

I read something about indian attacks relative to the Mason Dixon line having something to do with the formation of the Northern Panhandle (which logic says should be in PA) but am not certain whether that pertained to where Mason and Dixon (in the 1700s) measured to the Maryland line at Preston County or the extension which also formed the boundary with Virginia to the Marshall-Wetzel county lines, later to be extended to the Ohio River forming the county line.

As was common in many places, to some extent even in the deep South, there were divided loyalties. That is especially true in the "border states" and was certainly true in Wheeling and environs. Wheeling was the location for the organization of the Confederate unit known as the Shriver Grays, who fought with Clarksburg native Stonewall Jackson as well as the mustering location for the 1st. West Virginia Infantry, a Union regiment. http://www.wvgenweb.org/ohio/shriver.htm Some of the Shriver family still live in Wheeling, as do the descendants of their adversaries such as my own family. Bethany, located almost on the PA line near Pittsburgh, was Confederate leaning while West Liberty, just 3 miles away was Federal. Animosities among descendants were so strong that the athletic teams of the colleges located in those towns would not play each other in athletics until the 1940s after World War 2.

Shriver's home is among the many historical buildings still in use in the North Wheeling section. I will try to find the story of the tailor who made their uniforms for them, then took his payment and next day enlisted in the 1st. WV Infantry and post it if I can find it.

You're also going to find the names of many families who had men serving on both sides listed on the roster, and some of those families are still prominent in Wheeling today. There are also names there of people who were from Wheeling at the time and enlisted, but later moved to places like Charleston and Huntington where they are prominent family names today in those areas. Look for Quarrier and Patton, for example.

Last edited by CTMountaineer; 12-30-2012 at 06:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2012, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,300 posts, read 2,644,035 times
Reputation: 1404
Sorry about the messed up link to the Pierpoint letter. Here it is-

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2012, 10:00 PM
 
Location: WV/Va/Ky/Tn
705 posts, read 878,181 times
Reputation: 318
Good Work Bobilee, Nice Research! Very Informative look at WV History!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2012, 10:20 PM
 
9,402 posts, read 11,466,883 times
Reputation: 1507
I don't think anybody in Wheeling or elsewhere had a notion to form a different state. I think the new state was formed in a way to spite Virginia. Although Lincoln was the great concilliator and not a man to hold grudges, I believe he was especially ticked at R.E. Lee and associates and saw the division of the political entity of Virginia as justice in a sense. While the vast majority in Wheeling were Federal supporters, I am not aware of any specifically anti Virginia sentiment. Remember, the Washington family owned huge tracts of land in the Wheeling area and one of George's brothers is burried in Ohio County at Washington Farms. Although Federal in sentiment, there was still a Virginia connection, but Wheeling was industrial, not agrarian in a major way, so slavery and other states rights issues did not hold much sway there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2012, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,300 posts, read 2,644,035 times
Reputation: 1404
Yes, CT, Ohio County only had a 30% voter turnout on statehood on October 24, 1861. And there was probably a desire in Congress to punish Virginia for making the Confederacy a viable concern. And today, Dec. 31st, by the way, is the day Lincoln signed the WV statehood bill, 150 years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > West Virginia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top