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Old 11-15-2007, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Huntington, WV
74 posts, read 339,315 times
Reputation: 49

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Wow, DK, I didn't realize Morgantown was so civilized! I guess the rest of the state should follow their example.

I was up there just about 4 weeks ago, visiting my family, and I saw trash. In fact, just past the area where my parents live (on the Kingwood Pike-- still in Mon Co) there is A LOT of trash. You can't claim that Morgantown/Mon County has "almost eradicated" their trash problem. Have you been to Granville lately? or Sunnyside? or Rt. 119, past the mall? There are some pretty messy/trashy areas around the county.

For instance, my aunt lives in Granville (on Main Street) and the house right next to her has a SEVERE trash problem (old cars, appliances, furniture, bags of garbage, etc.) all over their yard and porch. The problem has become so bad that she has been contacting officials to try and get the house condemned!

Please don't act like Mon County is so much better and so much more advanced than the rest of the state, because it's not. Trash plagues the world, and it will never be completely eradicated.
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Old 11-15-2007, 02:50 PM
 
4,714 posts, read 11,959,002 times
Reputation: 1053
The crew of people that work for the county work outside the city limits. They have worked along Rt # 7, Cheat Lake Marina and the other areas I mentioned previously. It was a wise step for the County Commission to create this workforce. Much of the work is very hazardous beause of the terrain they work on. Sometimes winch lines are used to retreive the autos and large items.
If any other counties have a similar workforce, good for them. The big areas, used for years as public dumps are being cleaned up.
If that makes us civilized, thanks for the compliment, I hope the entire state can follow this example...
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Old 12-02-2007, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Elkins, WV
1,981 posts, read 5,347,486 times
Reputation: 810
Well, they have every right to live like that... I suppose... if they want. But when it comes to their children, something has to stop. Instilling the value of education is something that children growing up in poverty need. The apathetic viewpoint of just getting by until their 16 so they can then drop out and get a job doing nothing but continuing a cycle that started a long time ago with their parents, grandparents or great grandparents. Don't get me wrong with this next statement I'm about to make either. I'm a 100% very liberal Democrat, but I have a problem with people continually on our Welfare system. That is just putting extra strain on our tax payers, when some if not a large majority of these people could get a job, also, there are ways they could be certified with some skill. Lets face it, we all face some hard times in our lives and some people experience more rugged, but that is no excuse to fall into despair and leach of the Welfare system from people who really need it, and putting extra strain on the tax payers wallets
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Old 12-02-2007, 11:55 AM
 
4,714 posts, read 11,959,002 times
Reputation: 1053
The Chinese are using forced abortion and sterilization.
Our country tried to take these children into foster care but it caused a problem for the welfare system.
Now, eco-socialists are being unselfish and are being sterilized as they save the trees AND the whales...
back in the old days, people were responsible for their choices...shot-gun weddings and getting a JOB were the answer.
We have hundreds of assist programs to train and educate...what is lacking is motivation and self esteem.
West Virginians were not always this way...Most of it came after the Depression and then it was reinforced with the 'Great Society and the 'War on Poverty'...Who stole all of that money?
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Old 12-03-2007, 10:54 AM
 
240 posts, read 667,333 times
Reputation: 105
Yes, you're right GHO. People have a right to live the way they want and raise their children as they see fit as long as there is no abuse without government interference.

Now, you might have problems living like that within certain city limits but once you go out in the hollers, you see people from all kinds of socio economic backgrounds coexisting in peace and no one would even imagine commenting negatively on the worst hovel out there.

As for all the training programs, there is an invisible line at Beckley and they do not make it south of there. I have heard many children say their ambition is to work for the railroad or in the mines.

The alternative is fast food or retail. A college education is not even in the equation for people who are poor.

Yall seem to make the assumption all these folks are miserable living like this when in fact most are pretty content with what they have.

Just because you need status symbols and aspire to make $100,000 a year doesn't mean everyone is as materialistic. I'm not saying that to be judgemental. Everyone makes their own choices and people should respect them.

Anyway, with the state of the economy, when the house of cards collapses, it will hurt you more than them. Recessions don't effect poor people, only those with money.

Here is a story from today's Bluefield Daily Telegraph on someone yall would have probably liked to have removed from his home.

Homecoming

By Bill Archer
Bluefield Daily Telegraph

WOLF CREEK — The nation’s senior statesman, U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., made a pilgrimage to the site of his boyhood home in Mercer County on a “bleak” day that was made warm by the love emanating from several descendants of the families he grew up among and the people he serves in the public arena.

Byrd’s slow-speed, country roads motorcade weaved its way a few miles down U.S. Route 19 south of Camp Creek to a state-maintained gravel road along Wolf Creek to the 26-acre slice of almost heaven that Byrd’s father — Titus Dalton Byrd — bought for $1,800 in 1925.

The unique motorcade consisted of three state troopers in their own cruisers and a seven-man detachment of the Capitol Police there to guard Byrd, who serves as president pro-tempore of the U.S. Senate. Byrd, 90, traded in his seat in a spacious Chevrolet Denali for a Ford Explorer with more ground clearance to negotiate the last quarter-mile of a rock-infested, unimproved path to the site of the cabin with no heat, running water or electricity where Byrd read by the light of a kerosene lamp.

“We had a little patch of ground and tilled it,” Byrd said as he strolled around the rocky ground of his one-time front yard. “There’s where the old house stood. There...” he said pointing to a clearing near a wooded area. “Right up there.

“Bleak,” he said. It was bleak up here,” he said. Byrd walked around the uneven land with the help of two walking canes as his long-time personal assistant Jim Allen stood ready to help on one side, and Sam Vaught, the present owner of the former Byrd farm, stood by on the other side. Byrd didn’t need their help, but expressed appreciation for their support.

“We had nothing but an old lamp. No heat, no electricity, no radio, no nothing,” Byrd said as he walked slowly and shared stories of his family and the people who shaped his youth. “I’m just trying to get a feel of the place.”

Byrd shared stories about the teachers who ignited his thirst for learning, the neighbors who helped and provided details about when deputies of Mercer County Sheriff G.H. Crumpecker arrested his father for operating a moonshine still. “There were some other men making booze at the still too, but he was the one that was caught,” Byrd said.

“Well, this is the real thing,” Byrd said. “This is the place that produced a U.S. Senator ... I mean, the U.S. Senator from the state of West Virginia.”

Several of Vaught’s neighbors as well as a bluegrass ensemble gathered at Vaught’s home for a reception honoring Byrd,” “Hey! Hey! The gang’s all here,” Byrd said as he entered the room. Several spoke to him as a line of camera flashes went off with each smile. He greeted every expression of kindness with an even warmer expression of gratitude.

When he was told by a reporter that Tom Colley, executive editor of the Bluefield Daily Telegraph wanted to thank him for inviting the newspaper to accompany him on the visit, Byrd replied that he delivered the Daily Telegraph in his youth. “I managed to save $7, so I put it in a bank at Matoaka,” Byrd said. “The bank folded and I never saw that $7 again.”

Byrd addressed the people gathered at the Vaught home and read a passage from his autobiography, “Robert C. Byrd Child of the Appalachian Coalfields,” as a fire crackled from the fireplace in the main room of the Vaught home. Byrd, the oldest senator and the longest serving member of the U.S. Congress who has served almost 49 years in the House and Senate seemed right home among friends in Mercer County.
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Old 12-03-2007, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,320 posts, read 2,744,534 times
Reputation: 1459
I found the work of WV photographer Karen Steubing, here is a link to her Gallery, which relates to this subject. You might check out her other Galleries, she's pretty good. The Invisible Appalachia Photo Gallery by Karen Stuebing at pbase.com
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Old 12-03-2007, 02:41 PM
 
240 posts, read 667,333 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
I found the work of WV photographer Karen Steubing, here is a link to her Gallery, which relates to this subject. You might check out her other Galleries, she's pretty good. The Invisible Appalachia Photo Gallery by Karen Stuebing at pbase.com
Busted. :) I wondered how long it would take. Thanks for the compliment Bobilee.
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Old 12-03-2007, 03:08 PM
 
4,714 posts, read 11,959,002 times
Reputation: 1053
I have always thought Bob Byrd was an orphan...and now that you've been busted, should we call you Karen...had our first snow today. Think I'll check out your gallery....Did...You really do have a talent for photography...ha ha ha...what I would can a transference of intimacy...the boldness of it all.
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Old 12-03-2007, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,320 posts, read 2,744,534 times
Reputation: 1459
Hello millersangel aka Karen. I'm glad you are documenting West Virginia. So much of it is fragile, and the state has very little resource to save anything. In my home county of Cabell, my dad used to tell me of old houses, even an old plantantion with slave quarters, that he came across while hunting. The old plantation was destroyed when the freeway went through, along with my great-great-grandparents house which had been built around a log cabin. You have a lot of talent and I'm glad you are using it. Best wishes.
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Old 12-04-2007, 05:09 AM
 
240 posts, read 667,333 times
Reputation: 105
Thanks all. Bobilee, there are still so many old structures here, stores, barns, houses, I can't even photograph them all. I try though. :)

Sadly, the Old People's Bank in Bluefield collapsed. It was slated to for restoration. Now, it will taken down. It's right on the avenue which had to closed causing a negative impact on business because you have to take a circuitous route to get downtown.

It will cost a half million to just stabilize and two million to restore and the road would have to be closed for a long period of time, so it's been decided to just demolish it.

And to make matters worse, there is a sign on the four lane (460) that states "RT 19/ Downtown Bluefield/ Closed." Nothing about there being a detour. So people are bypassing the city.

Reminds me of Pocohantas. That whole town is falling down. But they are committed to restoring all the old buildings. Of course, the town is completely dead and they don't have a lot of business owners screaming.
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