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Old 04-05-2015, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Westchester NY
73 posts, read 97,427 times
Reputation: 34

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What is so good about "Walkability"? I mean most people refer to town that has a downtown area with many shops that are close to one another, but this is not practical.

What are you going to do? Walk to the grocery store, and carry your bags all the way to your apartment?
Or are you going to get your dry cleaning, pick up groceries, and try to walk with all of these things? LOL

Its much more practical to have a car and just load everything in to your car and make one trip.

Plus living in a rural area you can get your errands done with the car, then drive to a nice trail and walk there.

I have lived in a city-type area without a car, and I have lived in suburbs with a car, and I must say, suburbs is much better!

When I go grocery shopping I have to make like 5 trips with no car, and its obnoxious carrying groceries around, "Walkability" is definitely overrated.

Its not like you will be able to get all your errands done by walking from store to store, most likely you need somewhere to drop off the goods you purchase, and without a car its not really useful.


-matlab
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Old 04-05-2015, 09:20 PM
 
58 posts, read 88,529 times
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Walkability is very important to me when choosing a place to live. While I do most of my errands by car, I could never live somewhere that I was totally dependent on my car to get anywhere. I've always been happiest living in locations where I could walk to restaurants/coffee shops/stores. I love the freedom of having the option to walk places. That's just me though. Some people are perfectly fine living in non-walkable locations and that's okay too.
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Old 04-06-2015, 07:02 AM
 
677 posts, read 663,015 times
Reputation: 778
Quote:
Originally Posted by matlabmaster99 View Post
What is so good about "Walkability"? I mean most people refer to town that has a downtown area with many shops that are close to one another, but this is not practical.

What are you going to do? Walk to the grocery store, and carry your bags all the way to your apartment?
Or are you going to get your dry cleaning, pick up groceries, and try to walk with all of these things? LOL

Its much more practical to have a car and just load everything in to your car and make one trip.

Plus living in a rural area you can get your errands done with the car, then drive to a nice trail and walk there.

I have lived in a city-type area without a car, and I have lived in suburbs with a car, and I must say, suburbs is much better!

When I go grocery shopping I have to make like 5 trips with no car, and its obnoxious carrying groceries around, "Walkability" is definitely overrated.

Its not like you will be able to get all your errands done by walking from store to store, most likely you need somewhere to drop off the goods you purchase, and without a car its not really useful.


-matlab
Obviously, this is a matter of opinion. I prefer to live in a rural area with large plots of land. I don;t want to be able to walk to my next door neighbor, let alone a store. But that is just my preference. Other disagree and want to live in an area where they can walk.

As for whether it is practical to have a town that has a downtown area with many shops that are close to one another, it certainly is practical. It just has to be designed this way. Many towns in NY, including Westchester, while doing their master plans address long term plannign gowls like planned transit developments, where housing and mass transit are close, along with shopping.

People who enjoy walkability don't want to carry a lot of bags. They want to shop several times per week. Its a different lifestyle. They want small living units that are close to shopping. Its just a different lifestyle. I understand and prefer your view, but I certainly would not judge the lifestyle as harshly as you do.
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Old 04-10-2015, 01:47 PM
 
72 posts, read 101,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.strangelove View Post
People who enjoy walkability don't want to carry a lot of bags. They want to shop several times per week. Its a different lifestyle. They want small living units that are close to shopping. Its just a different lifestyle. I understand and prefer your view, but I certainly would not judge the lifestyle as harshly as you do.
Another good reason some people like a walkable town is so that kids can walk places like to school and friend's houses safely and more easily. When towns do "walkability" studies, they take into considerations things like sidewalks. So by saying you live somewhere that isn't walkable, you might be saying there aren't a lot of sidewalks. That also means walking dogs might be more difficult. Wanting small living units isn't really a reason people like walkable towns, IMO. And, people often like to avoid driving because it's better for the environment.

Peoples' perceptions of what is and isn't walkable also can change depending on where they live. For about six years I lived in an apartment in NYC that was about a half-mile walk from the nearest supermarket. So I walked that with both hands full of heavy grocery bags on a regular basis.
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:47 PM
 
677 posts, read 663,015 times
Reputation: 778
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkl2000 View Post
Another good reason some people like a walkable town is so that kids can walk places like to school and friend's houses safely and more easily. When towns do "walkability" studies, they take into considerations things like sidewalks. So by saying you live somewhere that isn't walkable, you might be saying there aren't a lot of sidewalks. That also means walking dogs might be more difficult. Wanting small living units isn't really a reason people like walkable towns, IMO. And, people often like to avoid driving because it's better for the environment.

Peoples' perceptions of what is and isn't walkable also can change depending on where they live. For about six years I lived in an apartment in NYC that was about a half-mile walk from the nearest supermarket. So I walked that with both hands full of heavy grocery bags on a regular basis.
One big issue with school districts is that many schools outside large cities do not allow walking to school, or actively discourage it. They feel walking in an area where there is massive and rushed dropoffs and buses is too dangerous. The majority of school in Westchester are like this. Its only those in south county in small suburbs that encourage or allow walking to school. Lakeland, my district, does not allow walking before 6th grade, even if with a parent. They can not refuse to let the kid in, but they will make life very difficult for you.

Its an issue of possibility too. For example, its about 1/4 mile to my next neighbor, a mile to the nearest intersection and 2-3 miles to the nearest business for me, and that is a gas station. I do not live in a walkable place. That said, with the low population density, you can play an entire game of basketball in the street and not be interrupted by a car, so it is certainly walkable for things like recreation, just not shopping and work.

The studies I have looked at while preparing my town's master plan have confirmed that millennials do indeed want smaller units and walkability of under 1/2 mile to shopping and mass transit. Many towns are planning TODs (transit oriented districts) in their master plans and in zoning, to allow for these changes.
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:42 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,954,506 times
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Driving everywhere, using the car even to visit the bathroom, is one of the main reasons Americans are obese, out of shape and prone to disease. With all the pollution in cities, it was found that city dwellers are still healthier. Mostly due to walking, like humans were intended by God.
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there.
6,809 posts, read 3,751,339 times
Reputation: 4546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rus12112 View Post
Walkability is very important to me when choosing a place to live. While I do most of my errands by car, I could never live somewhere that I was totally dependent on my car to get anywhere. I've always been happiest living in locations where I could walk to restaurants/coffee shops/stores. I love the freedom of having the option to walk places. That's just me though. Some people are perfectly fine living in non-walkable locations and that's okay too.
Yep I totally agree. Some element of walkability is vital to me. Partly it has to do with a feeling of isolation - if it snows and you can't get out for example, you can just walk to the local shop to pick up a loaf of bread.
But mainly it has to do with the fact that I love walking / it's nice to have somewhere to walk to / its great exercise.
We moved here 3 months ago from California - our previous house was in a very walkable area. I walked my kids to school and back every day without fail with our dog. I could send my son on errands on his bike to the local shop if we ran out of something. We lived 5 minutes from the local dog park.
Since moving to Hartsdale in a not very walkable area its been a completely different story. I've been driving the kids to school every day. Where we live has no sidewalks making walking with the dog very hazardous so I don't tend to go far. To my cost, in those 3 months I've put in a lot of weight. In a few months we are moving to an area of Scarsdale walking distance to one of the schools and the shops and with sidewalks. Can't wait.
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there.
6,809 posts, read 3,751,339 times
Reputation: 4546
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.strangelove View Post
One big issue with school districts is that many schools outside large cities do not allow walking to school, or actively discourage it. They feel walking in an area where there is massive and rushed dropoffs and buses is too dangerous. The majority of school in Westchester are like this. Its only those in south county in small suburbs that encourage or allow walking to school. Lakeland, my district, does not allow walking before 6th grade, even if with a parent. They can not refuse to let the kid in, but they will make life very difficult for you.


That's a crazy policy.

Who comes up with this stuff?
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:36 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 8,121,938 times
Reputation: 15088
I walk sometimes, I certainly prefer living in neighborhoods with sidewalks. What I don't like is how people in the city crow about how walkable it is and then never go anywhere, expect the corner bodega, unless they its via subway or taxi. Yea they walk, ....to the metrocard machine.
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:33 AM
 
58 posts, read 88,529 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruithne View Post
Yep I totally agree. Some element of walkability is vital to me. Partly it has to do with a feeling of isolation - if it snows and you can't get out for example, you can just walk to the local shop to pick up a loaf of bread.
But mainly it has to do with the fact that I love walking / it's nice to have somewhere to walk to / its great exercise.
We moved here 3 months ago from California - our previous house was in a very walkable area. I walked my kids to school and back every day without fail with our dog. I could send my son on errands on his bike to the local shop if we ran out of something. We lived 5 minutes from the local dog park.
Since moving to Hartsdale in a not very walkable area its been a completely different story. I've been driving the kids to school every day. Where we live has no sidewalks making walking with the dog very hazardous so I don't tend to go far. To my cost, in those 3 months I've put in a lot of weight. In a few months we are moving to an area of Scarsdale walking distance to one of the schools and the shops and with sidewalks. Can't wait.
That's exactly it. Also just for the option on a nice day to say "hey, it's nice out, maybe I'll walk to pick up my dry cleaning." I also grew up in a very walkable town so I think when you're used to it it's harder to live without it.
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