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Old 08-04-2018, 08:21 AM
 
Location: NY
12,263 posts, read 9,416,324 times
Reputation: 8028

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FYI -

The 2.8-square-mile village of Irvington is one of six villages in the riverside town of Greenburgh. Its historic center is defined by the bustling commercial hub of Main Street, which runs a half-mile downhill from Broadway to the Hudson River, and the narrow residential side streets that intersect it. Living there, the Ryans appreciated being steps from the train station, library and local shops and restaurants.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/01/r...tan-views.html
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:32 AM
 
669 posts, read 516,051 times
Reputation: 320
Do they really enforce a residents only policy at the Matthiessen Park mentioned in the article? Seems to go against the "progressive" and "welcoming" attitude the article illustrates.
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Old 08-08-2018, 08:31 AM
 
1,563 posts, read 2,734,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allanny13 View Post
Do they really enforce a residents only policy at the Matthiessen Park mentioned in the article? Seems to go against the "progressive" and "welcoming" attitude the article illustrates.
Yes, in a very bourgeois way. This is the same kind of exclusion that was struck in Connecticut. Someone needs to sue so everyone in Irvington's taxes go up.
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Old 08-08-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: New York
741 posts, read 451,074 times
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Yes, the park is residents only. So everyone drives to Dobbs' waterfront park to smoke instead.
Also, calling oneself 'progressive' is hardly a recipe for being welcoming. Quite the opposite here, the country-club mentality is strong and they'll make sure the 'riff raff' is adequately priced out.
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Old 08-09-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: NY
12,263 posts, read 9,416,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allanny13 View Post
Do they really enforce a residents only policy at the Matthiessen Park mentioned in the article? Seems to go against the "progressive" and "welcoming" attitude the article illustrates.
Lol...the author of this piece is a freelance journalist. Having been one myself in another lifetime I understand how these articles are created. She probably went to city-data.com and saw that 65% of registered voters voted for Hillary...no surprise in the bluest county in the blue state of NY. Then she called a friend who lives in Irvington who went on and on about how wonderfully progressive Irvington is and voila, she has her hook for the wonderfully progressive NYT.
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Old 09-15-2018, 10:05 PM
 
47 posts, read 31,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allanny13 View Post
Do they really enforce a residents only policy at the Matthiessen Park mentioned in the article? Seems to go against the "progressive" and "welcoming" attitude the article illustrates.
I don't think they "really" enforce park permits at any of the parks/playgrounds in Westchester. Have you seen the attendants actually checking resident permits at any WC park?

I'm sure every now and then they will, but it's not the norm.


Every week the NYT has one or two of these pieces on one of the various city neighborhoods or suburban towns and villages in the NY Metro. The Real Estate section is basically an ongoing sales pitch. Not that all the neighborhoods they cover don't have their charm, they certainly do, including the River Villages.
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Old 09-16-2018, 04:14 AM
 
1,563 posts, read 2,734,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by entropywins View Post
I don't think they "really" enforce park permits at any of the parks/playgrounds in Westchester. Have you seen the attendants actually checking resident permits at any WC park?

I'm sure every now and then they will, but it's not the norm.


Every week the NYT has one or two of these pieces on one of the various city neighborhoods or suburban towns and villages in the NY Metro. The Real Estate section is basically an ongoing sales pitch. Not that all the neighborhoods they cover don't have their charm, they certainly do, including the River Villages.
They do (or did) in Irvington.
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Old 09-17-2018, 05:50 PM
 
3,242 posts, read 1,849,791 times
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My wife and I both grew up there as did our parents and grandparents. It was once a middle class town where everyone knew everybody and everybody's business. It was like one great big giant family. Fortunately for Irvington there were no big box stores and there aren't any today. We used to go to Dobbs, Tarrytown or White Plains for the big box stores or groceries. Irvington's just a bunch of small shops on Main Street where the owners knew just about everyone who lived there. You could walk into a store just to shoot the breeze without even buying anything.

There were a number of estates Rutter's, Halsey's, Stern's etc. Some had mansions that resembled castles on the Rhine. Stan Getz had a mansion off Broadway which is now Highgate. Phelps Labs and then the Yeshiva was at the corner of Broadway and Harriman Road. All around the reservoir and the high pressure reservoir was all woods. Same for East Clinton Ave. all the way up to Halsey's pond. We used to ride dirt bikes throughout some of those properties. All are now gone, the large tracts of land sold off and multi million dollar homes went up. Homes on the streets from Astor Street on up were all owned by blue collar workers and their families. Today they are selling for $800,000 and up with very little property and on the street parking. Both Ardsley Park and Matthiessen Park were about the only exclusive places in Irvington. There were only a very few poor families if you want to call them that living in Irvington only one building that we would consider run down. We all called it "the barn" located on North Dutcher Street next to the bank. A lot of the apartments along Main Street were 3 bedroom until they started to turn them into studio's.

A lot of the village residents were employed by Lord and Burnham's which had a factory next to the railroad station and their main office was across the street on Astor Street which is now the public library. J.C. Turner which was bought by Weyerhaeuser had a lumber yard which is now a state park. As kids we used to go down there when the huge lumber ships came in to unload. If you've ever seen the movie "North by Northwest" the train goes right by the old J.C. Turner lumberyard. The lumber yard also employed many of the village residents. As did the village itself. Many of the village employees owned their own homes. These were jobs that required only a high school education. And yet you could afford a home in Irvington! We had a home and my father only had a high school education and my mother didn't work. Same for my wife's family along with my cousins who were also Irvington residents. Good luck with that now.

Just about every cop was a long time Irvington resident and knew all of us by name. Because of that we got away with a lot of stuff like underage drinking and at times a few bar fights at the Broadway Grill and at The Alibi on the corner of North Buckhout and Main. Whenever we got into trouble the cops would drive us home and we'd receive a good sound thrashing from our parents.

The Broadway Grill had a pool table which was the source of many of the problems. Drunk's don't like to lose especially when there's money on the table. I remember when a big fight broke out at the Main Street Gym after a High School dance when a bunch of out of towner's from Dobbs and Tarrytown started some trouble. It followed into the Pizza Shop which is now an electronics store. It was almost like a small riot which was too much for the local cops and they had to call in Dobbs Ferry and Tarrytown police. At the time Irvington only had three cops on duty, a desk sergeant, a foot patrol on Main Street and one in a patrol car. About the only thing they did was chase us kids around from place to place from our favorite drinking spots usually behind the Main Street school, down at the docks or on the aqueduct. There wasn't really any street crime to speak of, no muggings or assaults, only one murder that I can remember. When ever there was a fight it was caused by drinking and among willing participants.

Indeed Matthiessen Park what we called "down the beach" was closed to out of town residents during the summer months. There used to be a retired cop John Ruddick that would check for id's at the entrance. They used to have movie night "down the beach" every Wednesday night during the summer. One time one of the cops left the police car running at the entrance to the park while he walked down to where the movie was being shown. One of my friends hopped into the car and drove it into the Hudson River at the old boat ramp with the lights on and the siren going. That was the laugh of the town back then. Everybody knew who did it but no one said a word. He was the local hero.

Man, we had a ball back then. Irvington was a great place to grow up in. With all of the wealthy people that have taken over I wonder what it's like now? Most of our old friends have left just as we did as we could no longer afford to live there. I would imagine that if we ever came back to visit we'd be complete strangers in what was once our old home town?

Last edited by Ex New Yorker; 09-17-2018 at 06:00 PM..
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