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Old 05-20-2007, 08:54 AM
 
1 posts, read 9,925 times
Reputation: 10
Default Moving To Asheville, Advice For Me?

HI ALL,
FINDING YOUR INFORMATION POSTED ON ASHEVILLE MOST HELPFUL!
WORRIED ABOUT THE DRUG AVAILABILITY IN HI SCHOOLS, AS AM BRINGING MY DAUGHTER WIHT ME WHO IS A JUNIOR IN HIGH SCHOOL NEXT FALL.
I PLAN TO MOVE IN JULY OR AUG OF THIS YEAR.

ANY ADVICE AS TO WHICH TRAILER PARK IS BEST? I PREFER TO OWN, AS I DO HERE IN COLD, WET, NW PA. I KNOW SOME PARKS ARE SLUMMIER THAN OTHERS...CAN YOU HELP ME OUT? I NEED A 2 BR. MOBILE HOME, ONE OR TWO BATH, AFFORDABLE IN DECENT (NOT RICHEST, NOT POOREST) SECION OF TOWN. CAN YOU ALSO HELP ME WITH PARTS OF TOWN TO AVOID? (E,W,S,N?) ALSO WHERE IS BEST DISCOUNT SHOPPING? BEST AREA TO WORK? WHERE DO MOST THE GAYS LIVE?
I'D BE GRATEFUL FOR ALL AND ANY INFORMATION.

THANKS SO MUCH!!

mellievern

 
Old 05-20-2007, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Concord, NC
1,418 posts, read 4,932,896 times
Reputation: 580
It's a very beautiful area. The Blue Ridge Pkwy. runs right through town.

Very relaxed.

The climate is the best I've ever experienced.

People of all viewpoints (cons./lib/mod) seems to get along well. The city is on the liberal side, the suburbs more conservative. Most can find their nich.

The suburban areas around Asheville are affordable.

Lots to do for a small metro area. If you think it's "boring", you're just not looking!

Good interstate access to other parts of NC/SC.

Safe.

The only negatives I can think of is...

The city itself is pretty expensive.

The area has a good, but limited economy based around tourism/retirees/health care. So if you come with a job in line, are retired, or can work from home, you'll be fine.

It's a great area that I'd recommend. If I were to move anywhere else, it'd be the Asheville area!!
 
Old 05-20-2007, 03:54 PM
 
23 posts, read 216,302 times
Reputation: 73
friendnc, no disrespect, but asheville IS boring. Believe me, I've looked. If you don't live here, I don't think you can really say it is or isn't. Weekend or week long vacations or trips here are one thing. living here is entirely different.
 
Old 05-20-2007, 05:22 PM
 
1,021 posts, read 2,972,101 times
Reputation: 610
Exclamation Notice:

(Duplicate topics merged)

Carry on!
 
Old 05-20-2007, 08:32 PM
 
16,311 posts, read 14,106,257 times
Reputation: 7954
Quote:
Originally Posted by mellievern View Post
ANY ADVICE AS TO WHICH TRAILER PARK IS BEST?
Trailer parks here are for the most part cesspools. Most are being sold out to developers for wal-marts or other developments. Buncombe County (where Asheville is located) has just passed zoning laws, which will prevent any new trailer parks from being created. Not sure how it will affect the owner that wants to place one on their own property. Because of the zoning, the nicer trailer parks will be at a premium both in cost and space availability.

Land costs and property taxes are so high it is economically impractical to own a trailer park as you just can't make any kind of return on your investment.

New trailers have been banned from the city itself for a number of years now, though those that were in place were grandfathered in.
 
Old 05-20-2007, 08:40 PM
MB2
 
Location: Sebastian/ FL
3,496 posts, read 6,706,092 times
Reputation: 2624
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jcat View Post

I have a lot to say about Asheville, so here goes....................................

If you are a Floridian, originally from the North, they will call you a "half back". But, not to your face :}

Anything else you want to know, please ask. I will try
First off, thank's so much for also getting into the "not so great stuff" about your town, because I noticed a lot of people having blinders on, and are in denial concerning the places their are living at.
Second, huh, as long as I am not called a "Floridiot", I am lucky I guess??? lol
Thank's again for the truthful post, and I am sure, you helped a lot of concerned and interested people here!
Keep up the good work!
 
Old 05-21-2007, 03:06 AM
 
3 posts, read 56,126 times
Reputation: 50
Default The only place I have ever missed

It was really fun reading all these posts about Asheville, both the good and the bad. I was born in Asheville in the late 1940s (so I suppose I should be near retirement now, but I definitely am not planning on retiring for quite some time) and lived there off and on during various phases of my life, both as a child and as an adult. I mostly grew up in California in Atherton in the San Francisco Bay Area, but always yearned to be back in Asheville. Most of my adult life, though, I lived in Los Angeles. I guess I could say that I was a sort of yo-yo, going back and forth between Asheville and California, but with various other locational "branches" or "diversions" along the way. In Asheville, as a family we lived in Biltmore Forest and off of Chunns Cove, and on my own as an adult, I lived on Sunset Mountain and way off in Black Mountain. I have really moved around a lot and never really found "home" or a place that was satisfactory for long. But Asheville is the ONLY place that I have lived that I have ever really missed.

In Los Angeles, I have a great job and love the sunny weather and all the "stuff" that is available, but otherwise, the place is absolutely unlivable (traffic, killer housing costs, etc.). But forget Los Angeles, nobody should move there, more people are trying to get out than wanting to stay if only they could figure out a better place, and this thread is about ASHEVILLE.

Personally, just about the only problems with Asheville that I will accept are (a) not a lot of jobs (but it's great for doctors or lawyers, I think) and the jobs they do have don't pay much, and (b) housing costs are getting too high, but that is what you can expect with a place that is popular and with lots of advantages. I think with Asheville, the higher housing costs is based on economic fundamentals, you really are getting more in the way of atmosphere and advantages for your money than you are getting in, say, a neighboring North Carolina county. With Los Angeles, I CAN'T explain the high housing costs (doubling or tripling in the past three or four years), I mean, believe me, Los Angeles is NOT all that great either in economy or what you get when you live there to justify that kind of cost increase.

The suggestion to be "entreneurial" in Asheville is probably the best one, although I understand that not everyone can do that. Still, it's very much worth considering.

Asheville is not, and never has been, a typical southern town. At least as far back as the arrival of the Vanderbilts, it has been a haven for artists, innovative types, sophisticated thinkers, and people who want a little something more out of life than the average. Asheville is cultured and educated, perhaps more like a New England town, but amazingly friendly and polite, like a piece of decent southern aristocracy. If people view that as "pretentious", that is only because from their point of view and experience they only understand fakery and persona, not actuality. It's not "pretension" when it is real! So maybe one isn't part of the "old money" or society of Asheville, so what, join in with the "new" society of Asheville and take part in all that is now going on. Is it just "too" liberal? Well, I think the south can use a little bit of liberality; it's already got the conservatism down pat.

So, what things did I like about Asheville and still miss? For one thing, the seasons, four perfectly balanced seasonal changes that, each one, brings joy to the body and spirit. I couldn't even say which season I like the best, as each one has its special quality. Is there anywhere else in the country that has a better autumn? I doubt it, because the Blue Ridge Mountains have in that region the greatest concentration of different species of trees of any region in the U.S. Different trees equals different kinds of leaves and colors. Phenomenal. Winter brings on its own delights with snow, sometimes even for Christmas, but rarely enough to put a halt to everything. Asheville is big enough that it has road-clearing equipment and so on. Then spring bursts out with dogwood, rhododendron, fruit trees, and countless fragrant blossoms. Take a drive along the Blue Ridge Parkway or the streets of Biltmore Forest and enjoy this beauty. And then summer--my body back in dry climate California missed the humidity, as if one of my senses was now blinded because I couldn't "feel" anything in the air! I love the bright sunshine and the summer heat and the sudden gully-washers and thunderstorms. The air would be cleaned and the body energized. Who needs drugs, for heaven's sake?

There were complaints about restaurants...well, Asheville had almost NO restaurants as recently as the 70s, only a pizza parlor, a Chinese restaurant downtown, a couple of cafeterias, and a steak house (The Peddler, I think it was). But then suddenly, the number of eating establishments exploded. It's hard to name the names of all the good places, because the last time I was there was in the mid-90s and places do come and go. There's certainly always the Grove Park Inn, though, for meals on the veranda or their wonderful holiday buffets. My absolutely favorite, though, was to eat the buffet at the Deerpark. Naturally if you live in Asheville you will have to buy an annual pass to the Biltmore House so that you can use it as your own private park. I'd go on my exercise walks after work and if it rained, I'd racewalk through the Biltmore House! How many people in other cities can say that the Biltmore House is their own indoor exercise "track"?

I loved the restaurants around Pack Square or along Wall Street, and I thought the Old European Cafe and Vincent's Ear were great places to get coffee. Magnolia's was great, and I enjoyed the theatrical productions across the street at the ACT (and I even performed in some of them). For books I certainly liked Malaprop's and Downtown Books (great source for magazines and newspapers).

But I'm not so "highbrow" that I didn't love (and very much miss) a weekend breakfast at ol' "greasy spoon" Waffle House! (That's not unique to Asheville, though.)

Shopping? Well, there are two malls that have what every other urban area has, plus some outlet stores, so I have no tears for you if you can't find yourself any clothes or whatever. Want something a little bit more special, then head out to Biltmore Village. Doesn't Mr. Cram's stores have ANYTHING that would interest you?

Like music? There seems to be quite a lot of it in Asheville, from all the clubs with live music of every stripe (such as Gatsby's) to special events like Belle Chere and First Night downtown. Asheville was, and I am sure still is, quite up to snuff even in the realm of the latest dance music with hot new DJs. I wish I could find in L.A. a place to dance that is half as fun as the straight and gay dance clubs that Asheville has. Some posters in this thread were scared of gay people, as if that could possibly be a problem, but if it worries people, it's easy enough to avoid--don't go to Scandals, Hairspray Cafe, and O'Henry's (they don't want you anyway). This leaves all the several HUNDRED other places for you to enjoy freely without fear or worry.

Asheville even outdoes all but New York or California when it comes to movies. Of course you get all the latest regular movies at several multiplexes to choose from, but downtown there is Mr. Cram's theater (here he is again) and his Cinemateque series to satisfy more cutting edge tastes.

There is hiking and mountain biking and kayaking. For those who find Asheville "boring", they ought to compare it with towns in Oklahoma or Nebraska. Asheville could only be boring to those who ARE boring.

Finally, there is a sense of character that is hard to put your finger on, but if you are sensitive and aware you can feel it. It is like my real estate developer grandfather who refused to foreclose on mortgages or evict tenants during the Depression--"Nobody has any money, so what good does it do me to put them out on the street? A man needs a home where he can remain secure and recover his fortunes. When they are working again, they can start paying me again." Or this: "...the city, as a result of the grand construction schemes undertaken in the twenties, entered the depression with the highest per capita debt in the country. All across America, city governments declared bankruptcy, further contributing to the depths of national depression. But Ashevillians' stubborn mountain pride led them to choose a different path--ironically, one that made Asheville what it is today. They created a sinking fund to pay off every cent of the debt no matter how long it took, and the debt wasn't retired until 1977. For forty years Asheville lay in an economic cocoon--a long sleep." (This is from the book, A Good Place to Live, by Terry Pindell, who wrote the best and most accurate description of Asheville I have ever read.) If people take the downtown architectural walk in Asheville and enjoy the tremendous stock of beautiful vintage buildings that were never torn down but now serve as a discovered historical treasure, you have the civic and fiscal moral character of those earlier town citizens to thank. There's a reason that architecture-lover Prince Charles chose U.N.C. Asheville to come to present a couple of architecture courses a few years back.

For me, to ***** and moan about Asheville, a place that is uniquely special in so many ways and very unlike any other place in the United States, "thems are fightin' words", except I know it comes from people who don't matter because they don't belong and would do better elsewhere in some nameless, faceless, average little town. Leave Asheville for those who deserve it, drugs and crime in the projects be damned. And yes, you can avoid the projects; in fact, you'd have to work pretty hard to get yourself in there, and there is nothing about them that would "lure" you over there anyway (it's not like a main thoroughfare takes you through them).

And regarding drugs, that's the parents' job. My parents gave me one highly effective anti-drug lecture and even though I was a student at Berkeley during the 60s, surrounded by acid-dropping friends and joints of marijuana at every party, I partied without taking part in it. If you find your kid using meth or smoking crack, I wouldn't blame Asheville, I'd wonder why your kid was so weak and where you failed in your parenting. In life there are thousands of temptations surrounding you and your kids and only your good example as a parent and the strong personal character of your kids will protect them from whatever they come across, wherever they find them.

There is one thing about Asheville that I will decry, and that is the "new" county jail that was built right there front and center in downtown next to the old Courthouse and pink marble wedding cake City Hall. What a shame that is and I wonder, is that supposed to be a deterrent? Is there THAT much crime to turn the jail into a major component of the Asheville "skyline"?

This thread was begun with a mention of the "haves" and "have nots". In any place that has a great appeal, that becomes a serious problem, and Asheville is no exception. Whenever there are great numbers of "haves", and for sure Asheville has them, because the "haves" want to be in a wonderful place, there come along the parasites and the disgruntled to follow them and to try to "take" what they won't earn for themselves. That's an American problem, not an Asheville problem, but for sure, the city is a victim of it.

But to avoid that, is to prevent yourself from enjoying the things that brought the "haves" there in the first place. Maybe the better course is to come and enjoy, and keep yourself away from the people and areas that are the problems. Fortunately, in Asheville, you can do that.

Last edited by thomasdosborneii; 05-21-2007 at 03:37 AM..
 
Old 05-21-2007, 07:34 AM
 
10,150 posts, read 16,325,935 times
Reputation: 7908
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasdosborneii View Post
It was really fun reading all these posts about Asheville, both the good and the bad. I was born in Asheville in the late 1940s (so I suppose I should be near retirement now, but I definitely am not planning on retiring for quite some time) and lived there off and on during various phases of my life, both as a child and as an adult. I mostly grew up in California in Atherton in the San Francisco Bay Area, but always yearned to be back in Asheville. Most of my adult life, though, I lived in Los Angeles. I guess I could say that I was a sort of yo-yo, going back and forth between Asheville and California, but with various other locational "branches" or "diversions" along the way. In Asheville, as a family we lived in Biltmore Forest and off of Chunns Cove, and on my own as an adult, I lived on Sunset Mountain and way off in Black Mountain. I have really moved around a lot and never really found "home" or a place that was satisfactory for long. But Asheville is the ONLY place that I have lived that I have ever really missed.

In Los Angeles, I have a great job and love the sunny weather and all the "stuff" that is available, but otherwise, the place is absolutely unlivable (traffic, killer housing costs, etc.). But forget Los Angeles, nobody should move there, more people are trying to get out than wanting to stay if only they could figure out a better place, and this thread is about ASHEVILLE.

Personally, just about the only problems with Asheville that I will accept are (a) not a lot of jobs (but it's great for doctors or lawyers, I think) and the jobs they do have don't pay much, and (b) housing costs are getting too high, but that is what you can expect with a place that is popular and with lots of advantages. I think with Asheville, the higher housing costs is based on economic fundamentals, you really are getting more in the way of atmosphere and advantages for your money than you are getting in, say, a neighboring North Carolina county. With Los Angeles, I CAN'T explain the high housing costs (doubling or tripling in the past three or four years), I mean, believe me, Los Angeles is NOT all that great either in economy or what you get when you live there to justify that kind of cost increase.

The suggestion to be "entreneurial" in Asheville is probably the best one, although I understand that not everyone can do that. Still, it's very much worth considering.

Asheville is not, and never has been, a typical southern town. At least as far back as the arrival of the Vanderbilts, it has been a haven for artists, innovative types, sophisticated thinkers, and people who want a little something more out of life than the average. Asheville is cultured and educated, perhaps more like a New England town, but amazingly friendly and polite, like a piece of decent southern aristocracy. If people view that as "pretentious", that is only because from their point of view and experience they only understand fakery and persona, not actuality. It's not "pretension" when it is real! So maybe one isn't part of the "old money" or society of Asheville, so what, join in with the "new" society of Asheville and take part in all that is now going on. Is it just "too" liberal? Well, I think the south can use a little bit of liberality; it's already got the conservatism down pat.

So, what things did I like about Asheville and still miss? For one thing, the seasons, four perfectly balanced seasonal changes that, each one, brings joy to the body and spirit. I couldn't even say which season I like the best, as each one has its special quality. Is there anywhere else in the country that has a better autumn? I doubt it, because the Blue Ridge Mountains have in that region the greatest concentration of different species of trees of any region in the U.S. Different trees equals different kinds of leaves and colors. Phenomenal. Winter brings on its own delights with snow, sometimes even for Christmas, but rarely enough to put a halt to everything. Asheville is big enough that it has road-clearing equipment and so on. Then spring bursts out with dogwood, rhododendron, fruit trees, and countless fragrant blossoms. Take a drive along the Blue Ridge Parkway or the streets of Biltmore Forest and enjoy this beauty. And then summer--my body back in dry climate California missed the humidity, as if one of my senses was now blinded because I couldn't "feel" anything in the air! I love the bright sunshine and the summer heat and the sudden gully-washers and thunderstorms. The air would be cleaned and the body energized. Who needs drugs, for heaven's sake?

There were complaints about restaurants...well, Asheville had almost NO restaurants as recently as the 70s, only a pizza parlor, a Chinese restaurant downtown, a couple of cafeterias, and a steak house (The Peddler, I think it was). But then suddenly, the number of eating establishments exploded. It's hard to name the names of all the good places, because the last time I was there was in the mid-90s and places do come and go. There's certainly always the Grove Park Inn, though, for meals on the veranda or their wonderful holiday buffets. My absolutely favorite, though, was to eat the buffet at the Deerpark. Naturally if you live in Asheville you will have to buy an annual pass to the Biltmore House so that you can use it as your own private park. I'd go on my exercise walks after work and if it rained, I'd racewalk through the Biltmore House! How many people in other cities can say that the Biltmore House is their own indoor exercise "track"?

I loved the restaurants around Pack Square or along Wall Street, and I thought the Old European Cafe and Vincent's Ear were great places to get coffee. Magnolia's was great, and I enjoyed the theatrical productions across the street at the ACT (and I even performed in some of them). For books I certainly liked Malaprop's and Downtown Books (great source for magazines and newspapers).

But I'm not so "highbrow" that I didn't love (and very much miss) a weekend breakfast at ol' "greasy spoon" Waffle House! (That's not unique to Asheville, though.)

Shopping? Well, there are two malls that have what every other urban area has, plus some outlet stores, so I have no tears for you if you can't find yourself any clothes or whatever. Want something a little bit more special, then head out to Biltmore Village. Doesn't Mr. Cram's stores have ANYTHING that would interest you?

Like music? There seems to be quite a lot of it in Asheville, from all the clubs with live music of every stripe (such as Gatsby's) to special events like Belle Chere and First Night downtown. Asheville was, and I am sure still is, quite up to snuff even in the realm of the latest dance music with hot new DJs. I wish I could find in L.A. a place to dance that is half as fun as the straight and gay dance clubs that Asheville has. Some posters in this thread were scared of gay people, as if that could possibly be a problem, but if it worries people, it's easy enough to avoid--don't go to Scandals, Hairspray Cafe, and O'Henry's (they don't want you anyway). This leaves all the several HUNDRED other places for you to enjoy freely without fear or worry.

Asheville even outdoes all but New York or California when it comes to movies. Of course you get all the latest regular movies at several multiplexes to choose from, but downtown there is Mr. Cram's theater (here he is again) and his Cinemateque series to satisfy more cutting edge tastes.

There is hiking and mountain biking and kayaking. For those who find Asheville "boring", they ought to compare it with towns in Oklahoma or Nebraska. Asheville could only be boring to those who ARE boring.

Finally, there is a sense of character that is hard to put your finger on, but if you are sensitive and aware you can feel it. It is like my real estate developer grandfather who refused to foreclose on mortgages or evict tenants during the Depression--"Nobody has any money, so what good does it do me to put them out on the street? A man needs a home where he can remain secure and recover his fortunes. When they are working again, they can start paying me again." Or this: "...the city, as a result of the grand construction schemes undertaken in the twenties, entered the depression with the highest per capita debt in the country. All across America, city governments declared bankruptcy, further contributing to the depths of national depression. But Ashevillians' stubborn mountain pride led them to choose a different path--ironically, one that made Asheville what it is today. They created a sinking fund to pay off every cent of the debt no matter how long it took, and the debt wasn't retired until 1977. For forty years Asheville lay in an economic cocoon--a long sleep." (This is from the book, A Good Place to Live, by Terry Pindell, who wrote the best and most accurate description of Asheville I have ever read.) If people take the downtown architectural walk in Asheville and enjoy the tremendous stock of beautiful vintage buildings that were never torn down but now serve as a discovered historical treasure, you have the civic and fiscal moral character of those earlier town citizens to thank. There's a reason that architecture-lover Prince Charles chose U.N.C. Asheville to come to present a couple of architecture courses a few years back.

For me, to ***** and moan about Asheville, a place that is uniquely special in so many ways and very unlike any other place in the United States, "thems are fightin' words", except I know it comes from people who don't matter because they don't belong and would do better elsewhere in some nameless, faceless, average little town. Leave Asheville for those who deserve it, drugs and crime in the projects be damned. And yes, you can avoid the projects; in fact, you'd have to work pretty hard to get yourself in there, and there is nothing about them that would "lure" you over there anyway (it's not like a main thoroughfare takes you through them).

And regarding drugs, that's the parents' job. My parents gave me one highly effective anti-drug lecture and even though I was a student at Berkeley during the 60s, surrounded by acid-dropping friends and joints of marijuana at every party, I partied without taking part in it. If you find your kid using meth or smoking crack, I wouldn't blame Asheville, I'd wonder why your kid was so weak and where you failed in your parenting. In life there are thousands of temptations surrounding you and your kids and only your good example as a parent and the strong personal character of your kids will protect them from whatever they come across, wherever they find them.

There is one thing about Asheville that I will decry, and that is the "new" county jail that was built right there front and center in downtown next to the old Courthouse and pink marble wedding cake City Hall. What a shame that is and I wonder, is that supposed to be a deterrent? Is there THAT much crime to turn the jail into a major component of the Asheville "skyline"?

This thread was begun with a mention of the "haves" and "have nots". In any place that has a great appeal, that becomes a serious problem, and Asheville is no exception. Whenever there are great numbers of "haves", and for sure Asheville has them, because the "haves" want to be in a wonderful place, there come along the parasites and the disgruntled to follow them and to try to "take" what they won't earn for themselves. That's an American problem, not an Asheville problem, but for sure, the city is a victim of it.

But to avoid that, is to prevent yourself from enjoying the things that brought the "haves" there in the first place. Maybe the better course is to come and enjoy, and keep yourself away from the people and areas that are the problems. Fortunately, in Asheville, you can do that.
Oh my - you expressed this SO WELL! I am just a newcomer to this special town, and not even full time at that, but it is the most wonderful and magical place FOR ME (and hubby) that we've ever been! If you haven't been to Asheville since the 90's, you should see it now - I just can't believe the food and entertainment scene here, it is just hard to believe that this is such a small city, since it offers so much.

I don't want to gush too much, since I have been accused by a couple of posters on this forum of hyping up the town too much thereby "inviting more people to the party", but I just had to let you know, thomasdosborneii, that everything you said was so "right on", especially about the people who don't like it. I so agree! They can move on, and find another place that suits them better. Asheville definitely has a high consciousness that is "real" as you say, and you can feel the vibe as soon as you hit town.

Hope you find your way back someday, LA does not sound like a place that nourishes the spirit.
 
Old 05-21-2007, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Florida - Wellington
5 posts, read 41,991 times
Reputation: 15
Default What about Waynesville?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jcat View Post

I have a lot to say about Asheville, so here goes.

We moved here a year ago from Palm Beach County, Fl. Live in South Asheville, Beautiful development, great neighbors. As a matter of fact, I am extremely impressed with nearly all of the people in of Asheville. These people are considerate, polite, helpful, and just plain nice. Southern hospitality reigns here.

On a sour note, there is a serious drug problem here. Very high personal crime rate, very high violent crime rate, for such a small city. Go to CnnMoney.com and read about Asheville. 70% and higher of the crime is drug related. Where the national average is 100 per 1,000, we are at 177 for personal crime.

The socioeconomic differences between people here is absolutely astounding. All walks of life are gathered here. Very diverse racially, as well. You can walk out of a beautiful neighborhood, and be in a low income, or trailer park area instantly. Buncombe County (Asheville) has more trailer parks and trailer homes than any other in NC.

As far as a job here, I think there is a lot of whining going on. Being an entrepreneur, I see several opportunities here that are overlooked. There are many people here with superfluous amounts of money to spend. For example the area in South Asheville, Biltmore Park, Biltmore Forest, The Ramble, ..these people buy, eat, use...etc. Why not open your own business here! A restaurant would be a good start! We are lacking in S Asheville of a decent Italian restaurant, as well as many others(plenty of Mexican). If you don't get to a restaurant by 5, you can expect to wait a long time. The decent (few) restaurants are jammed....literally. Sunday after church...forget about eating anywhere...the places are packed. Carrabas opened in Arden/Fletcher recently, and they are so busy, you cannot even stand int here. People bump into you. The wait there, by 5:15 is 45 minutes to an hour.

How about a specialty store, a bakery (an Italian Bakery cannot be found), a clothing store (nothing in S Asheville, nowhere to shop), a baby furniture store, a deli, any service...any service ...would do well. A spa, a decent nail place,...use your imagination. This place is ripe for decent commerce. Oh, and what about a day care center? Huge over crowding problem there too!!!

Better yet, come here and work out of your house! An ecommerce store, and ebay store, an organizing service, a house cleaning service, a personal chef service...again, the sky is the limit. Forget about the 9-5 BS, and having a boss. Who needs it anymore? Teachers and counselors don't get paid enough anyway.

Schools--Sore subject with me. No better than Florida. Again, the socioeconomic differences between the kids poses a HUGE problem. Additionally, the way that many teachers speak, (southern drawl is fine) using improper English, is unsettling. Not all teachers, but many. The education here is nothing outstanding, nothing unusual. Very common. Kids here are practically failing in math and reading, particularly the African American children. It is very sad, but the stats show it to be true. Many children don't have parents together, single Moms...etc. So, the kids are not getting the attention and discipline at home, therefor they "act out" in school in very upsetting ways (sometimes criminally). Much of the time at school is spent waiting for a teacher to finish corrrecting yet another kid who cannot behave. We were in the "best" school system (Estes,Valley Springs, TC Roberson) Look them up online and see greatschools.com, or on the site North Carolina Report Card, We are sending our kids to private school now.

Taxes- They are very high. (property). City is annexing towns on the outskirts of the city as fast as they can. Look on a map, and find Biltmore Lake, in Candler. Yep, they are annexing that too!! Then there is the water Bill -way too high! There is a cap gains tax on it, because the City needs to replace their 100 YEAR OLD UNDERGROUND cast iron pipes.!!!!!! Yes, you read that right. The pipes are giving way, and it is a huge problem. Water bill here is double what our FL bill was, and we HAD A POOL in FL. Lastly, there is a .29 gasoline tax!!!!! And the sales tax is high. OOps, forgot state income tax. (unlike FL)...oh, no and here is the real kicker...an automobile tax, EVERY year, that you HAVE to pay. Whether your car is leased, or you own it!!!! For one of our cars, it was $800!! And again, to be clear, it has to be paid EVERY year, on the same car. (it goes down a little each year, as the car ages)

Drivers license- You have to take an entire test, and have lots of documentation. Don't go there with your LAMINATED Social Security Card. Uh uh..no no, they will not accept it in lamination!! And if you are a husband and wife, the wife needs a bill in her OWN name. The husband needs a bill in his name. OK, I am bitter. I had to go there 3 times before I had all my docs in a row!

Asheville is beautiful, and the weather is good. Only REALLY cold for 2 months out of the year (20's and 30's). Even then, the sun pours down during the day. Other times of the year it is so pretty out, and not too hot. 70's. Hot in July and August. (80's)

You might want to rent at first, to avoid all the extra costs. The Real Estate Market is good here. No real decline, actually staying above most markets. A gradual increase each year of 7 - 10% is realized here. No real change in that.

If you are a Floridian, originally from the North, they will call you a "half back". But, not to your face :}

Anything else you want to know, please ask. I will try





I'm moving to Waynesville from Wellington in June - does anyone have an opinion on Waynesville?
 
Old 05-21-2007, 04:21 PM
 
11 posts, read 53,518 times
Reputation: 13
Hi: we are considering land on Reynolds mountain; can anyone provide feedback; pro and con? Thanks.
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