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Old 09-18-2017, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Reno, Nv
46 posts, read 56,154 times
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So when we tell people that we will be moving to Wisconsin, the first thing they say is "you know it snows a lot there right?" I have also heard that there is an actual 4 seasons, and the snow isn't around too long. So can someone tell me honestly, how harsh the winters actually are (on average)? Is it a little better towards the south side of the state, middle, etc? I'm actually looking forward to this, and I don't care about the snow. I like the idea of having many trees, and water close by again.

One area in particular we were looking at was Rice Lake. Any Pros-Cons for living there?
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Old 09-19-2017, 12:58 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,777 posts, read 1,060,097 times
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I deleted the message because it was in a poor format. Try this link for Rice Lake climate info:
https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/uswi0588
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Old 09-19-2017, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,787 posts, read 7,707,284 times
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When you get there, talk to the locals about winter preparations. You need good warm boots, couple of pair of gloves, sweaters, sweatshirts, and a very warm hat. Plus, you'll need stuff for your car. Sometimes winters are mild, and not too bad, but sometimes the winters are long, brutally cold, or very snow, or a combination of some or all of those aspects.
But, if you're tough and hardy, Wis. can be wonderful. I'd move back, but my wife cannot tolerate cold at all.
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Old 09-19-2017, 09:36 PM
 
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You'll need a Stormy Kromer to keep your head warm..... https://www.stormykromer.com/
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Old 09-20-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Reno, Nv
46 posts, read 56,154 times
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I've got no problem with cold and snow. Growing up in Reno (high desert) I've become accustomed to extreme highs and lows. Granted the lows are probably nothing like Wisconsin winters, but I'm sure I can handle them. Just have to get warmer clothing. It's my wife that will probably have more issues. Being wheelchair bound, and cold even when it's 70-80 degrees has me concerned. Our son loves the idea, especially when we started showing him all the parks around there, and he loves the snow.
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Old 09-20-2017, 12:34 PM
 
Location: WI
3,823 posts, read 8,924,709 times
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Yes winters in WI can be harsh; esp for those who do not partake in and enjoy outdoor activities (skiing, ice fishing, hiking, etc). Some will hibernate in winter, heck i do that some times as I really dislike winter and i'm from here lol.
If one plans for the cold (good clothing, car being ready as noted elsewhere, take into account longer drive times, etc) it is easier to deal with. Obviously on an extremely cold and snowy day it will be tough. Same goes for the hottest summer day. Its always the extremes that make the season worse.

It can boil down to being able to acclimate to it. We moved to SC for a few years, really loved the climate. Easily acclimated to the long hot periods, even more so than locals born there. But we would be outside doing things there we enjoyed.... making it far easier to deal with those temps.

So plan accordingly and go explore the area when you arrive. Wi can be a beautiful state.
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Old 09-21-2017, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Maiden Rock, WI
32 posts, read 37,882 times
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Thumbs up Wisconsin is great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RenoViking View Post
So when we tell people that we will be moving to Wisconsin, the first thing they say is "you know it snows a lot there right?" I have also heard that there is an actual 4 seasons, and the snow isn't around too long. So can someone tell me honestly, how harsh the winters actually are (on average)? Is it a little better towards the south side of the state, middle, etc? I'm actually looking forward to this, and I don't care about the snow. I like the idea of having many trees, and water close by again.

One area in particular we were looking at was Rice Lake. Any Pros-Cons for living there?
First off, my wife has family in Reno. We lived there and in Fallen, NV for over a year. I'm originally from Texas. We moved to Wisconsin from Texas over 3 years ago. Haven't looked back yet. We have lived in the Hayward about 40 minutes north of "Rice Lake" and now own a home in Maiden Rock, WI which is on the Mississippi River / Bluffs area down by Red Wing, MN.

Our son played Baseball in Rice Lake, and we loved everything about the town. It was our "Big City" to get everything we needed, close enough to Hayward. We almost moved there, but couldn't find the home of our dreams at the right price. It's amazing we were able to find a home where we did for the price we are getting. Coming from Texas, EVERYONE and I MEAN EVERYONE said "THE WEATHER IS BRUTAL".

Wife and I have lived in over 9 states, mostly southern. The farthest North was Reno/Fallen. We truly love the 4 SEASONS. Yes winters are cold, but the cold is different. It's not a death spiral. It's more like what you get up there. It will be a little more humid than you get, but don't let that scare yah. They don't get near the amounts of snow that Tahoe got even this last year. Yes you can get 6 mos of winter sometimes, but we haven't experienced that in our time.

If you have the opportunity take it. If you want some real conversations you can pm me and I will give yah my cell. I learned alot about Rice Lake, and spent a majority of my winters and summers there for the sports.

Good Luck!
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Old 09-21-2017, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Superior, Wisconsin
4,762 posts, read 555,820 times
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I lived in suburban New York City for many years before relocating to Superior, Wisconsin (which is about 90 miles north of Rice Lake). The most shocking difference I noticed (for me, at least) between East Coast winters and Wisconsin winters was not the overall amount of snow, nor the severity of each storm, but the length of the winter.

Winters last much later into the year; we had a snowstorm (although a mild one) here on May 1 this year, whereas no measurable snow has ever been reported in May in recorded history in New York City. April snowstorms are exceedingly rare on the East Coast (about once every 10 years). The usual last snowfall in NY occurs in mid-March. Here, April is still a winter month, and May is the beginning of spring, and June is definitely still spring and not summer. Freezing temperatures at night are common through late May, and nights in the 40's continue on into June.

Wisconsin winters also start earlier; the second half of August is clearly fall-like, with nighttime temperatures dropping into the 40's, and the first frost occurs usually in early October. On the East Coast, it is not unusual to have no frost at all until mid-November, let alone snow. There have been many years where the first major snowstorm in NY doesn't occur until after Christmas and New Year's.

So, we're talking about a 3-month winter versus a 6-month winter.
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Old 09-21-2017, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Maiden Rock, WI
32 posts, read 37,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveC1024 View Post
I lived in suburban New York City for many years before relocating to Superior, Wisconsin (which is about 90 miles north of Rice Lake). The most shocking difference I noticed (for me, at least) between East Coast winters and Wisconsin winters was not the overall amount of snow, nor the severity of each storm, but the length of the winter.

Winters last much later into the year; we had a snowstorm (although a mild one) here on May 1 this year, whereas no measurable snow has ever been reported in May in recorded history in New York City. April snowstorms are exceedingly rare on the East Coast (about once every 10 years). The usual last snowfall in NY occurs in mid-March. Here, April is still a winter month, and May is the beginning of spring, and June is definitely still spring and not summer. Freezing temperatures at night are common through late May, and nights in the 40's continue on into June.

Wisconsin winters also start earlier; the second half of August is clearly fall-like, with nighttime temperatures dropping into the 40's, and the first frost occurs usually in early October. On the East Coast, it is not unusual to have no frost at all until mid-November, let alone snow. There have been many years where the first major snowstorm in NY doesn't occur until after Christmas and New Year's.

So, we're talking about a 3-month winter versus a 6-month winter.

You fail to mention to him that he is out of the LAKE EFFECT weather in Rice Lake, compared to you. I mean even in Hayward which is halfway between had 3-6 more inches of snowfall and degrees on average. Superior is definately getting worse weather than Hayward did, and if you go further east like towards Mellen, you really get some serious winters.

For such small state, I found the weather changed pretty quick from Superior down to Eau Claire!
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
146 posts, read 66,156 times
Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by RenoViking View Post
So when we tell people that we will be moving to Wisconsin, the first thing they say is "you know it snows a lot there right?" I have also heard that there is an actual 4 seasons, and the snow isn't around too long. So can someone tell me honestly, how harsh the winters actually are (on average)? Is it a little better towards the south side of the state, middle, etc? I'm actually looking forward to this, and I don't care about the snow. I like the idea of having many trees, and water close by again.

One area in particular we were looking at was Rice Lake. Any Pros-Cons for living there?
Yes the winters are less harsh in the southern part of the state.

Wisconsin’s all-time, lowest temperature is -55°F on February 2 & 4, 1996, near Couderay (Sawyer Co.). Readings of -30°F or colder have been recorded in every month from November through April.

Average annual snowfall in Wisconsin ranges from 32 to 40 inches near the Illinois border to 135 to 168 inches in the Iron County snow-belt from Gurney to Hurley. The extremes are 31.9 inches in Beloit, Rock County to 167.5 inches in Hurley, Iron County, for the period of 1981-2010.

Rice Lake average 54" of snow per year.
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