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Old 05-13-2009, 09:58 PM
 
42 posts, read 136,008 times
Reputation: 23

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Instead of bothering to explain the concept of New Urbanism or New Pedestrianism with text (since it'd probably be much too long-winded), I've hyperlinked a trailer for an upcoming documentary called "New Urban Cowboy," which I think adequately imparts the principles on which these movements are centered.


YouTube - New Urban Cowboy: Toward a New Pedestrianism

Are there any walkable/livable towns, villages, or cities in Wisconsin that follow this model? I'm not so much looking for a newly constructed development, but just a town or city that is designed with mixed-use, intermodal structures. Are there any plans to integrate these ideas into existing towns? Is there any kind of grassroots movement pushing for these principles?

You might also check out Wikipedia for a cursory level of information on this subject: New Urbanism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-13-2009, 11:33 PM
 
42 posts, read 136,008 times
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From what I've seen in pictures and read on this forum, Madison and La Crosse seem to employ plenty of these elements into their design. Are there any smaller, less obvious examples?
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Old 02-10-2011, 05:52 PM
 
Location: NYC
42 posts, read 72,822 times
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I grew up on the east side of Milwaukee, which is great for walking to amenities. I lived a few blocks from North Avenue, which put restaurants, cafes, a library, three parks (including Lake Park, which is a very nice park indeed), my grade school, three movie theaters, a bowling alley, lots of shopping, bars, local bus lines and the lakefront all in walking distance. If you live near either North Avenue or on the lower east side near Brady Street, you'll find plenty to do. Downtown nearer to the lakefront than deeper in is also very nice with lots of amenities and attractive pre-war apartment buildings. Also, Riverwest has been an up-and-coming neighborhood for a long time--I haven't been there for awhile, so I can't fully comment on it, but I know there was a lot of activity in the way of retail and restaurants moving in, which were positively affecting the neighborhood. There are also areas of Shorewood, which--if you're close enough to Oakland Avenue, offer some walkable amenities. Cedarburg, which is farther north, also has a nice area of shops and restaurants, but you'd want to make sure you lived close enough to it to walk. There is a variety of houses and apartment buildings in all these areas. Some have yards; some have driveways; some have garages; some have porches; some have them all. It's been awhile since you posted, but I hope this helps!

P.S. The University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee is located between the east side and Shorewood.
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Old 02-10-2011, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Riverwest, MKE
280 posts, read 590,778 times
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I agree with everything Breezy says. And as someone who lives in Riverwest (well, not exactly at this moment, but I will be returning in the summer) it pretty much runs on the concept of New Urbanism and has an active neighborhood association that's very ahead of the curve when it comes to embracing new ideas (a refreshing change of pace from the stuck-in-1955 mentality of most of Milwaukee's "leadership"). It is a bit "rough around the edges," but not only do I think that adds to its charm, it's probably the thing that's saved Riverwest from gentrification which is usually what happens to neighborhoods when words like "hip" and "bohemian" start being used to describe them. I think it also keeps the levels of pretention and snobbishness ("smug" for you South Park fans) to a minimum since a lot of times that tends to overrun areas that pride themselves on how progressive they are.

Bay View, Third Ward and Walker's Point are also areas in Milwaukee that are worth checking out.

Last edited by Devitron5000; 02-10-2011 at 09:01 PM..
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:32 PM
 
Location: NYC
42 posts, read 72,822 times
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Yep, I second everything Devitron says as well. Bay View, the Third Ward and Walker's Point are all worth checking out as well!
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