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Old 07-01-2010, 10:15 PM
 
3,651 posts, read 5,650,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIslandEddie View Post
Once, it was the strong back that served the needs of the working world. Soon, it became the smart mind and the entrepreneurial spirit that triumphed, and now that we have digressed into a dog-eat-dog society, it is the giant corporations which set the standards of low wages for the producers, better wages for the managers and the best deal for the greedy corporate heads, brokers and bankers, entertainers and politicians because power IS money and money converts to power.
What good is job training when there are no jobs? Why get a costly education when you can make money selling drugs or swatting a baseball? Why go to college if you can't find a job that will allow you to repay the tuition? If I were hiring, I'd opt to go with the candidate that has the experience although a younger person might seem to require less money, you only get what you pay for, nothing more but hopefully, nothing less.
I'm out of work for 16 months now, living in a high cost area and trying to survive on Social security. I have a lot of talent, a keen mind but a limit on the application base and my hopes are dashed because of this failing economy. Meanwhile, I keep myself from stagnating by spending my time here on the internet, the poker room, facebook and youtube. Thank God that I've seen the best years that America has ever seen and my greatest fears are for the generation that my grandchildren will see.
Great post, bravo, but esp the bolded part....there's a reason that older people tend to get paid more: experience. It's valuable and employers know it. That's why many (most?) jobs will say "at least X yrs experience" with this or that.
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Old 07-01-2010, 10:29 PM
 
3,651 posts, read 5,650,343 times
Reputation: 2614
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
This is true but they also ask about your education and want to know when you graduated from high school, etc. so that's pretty 'telling'.
What that tells me is they're begging for a lawsuit, since asking you when you graduated HS is the same as asking you your age.



Quote:
Originally Posted by catfancier View Post
It's not hard at all. I registered with a staffing agency and the application said not to list your birthdate unless you were "under 20."
Really? Which one?

Quote:
BUT...for "verification" purposes (and something about Homeland Security, I forget now)-- they REQUIRED photocopying your driver's license!!
Again I'd love to know what staffing agency "requires" this.

Quote:
There are also several free websites that may provide an age just looking up the person's name and city of residence....
I question if any such web site is truly reliable, never mind the idea of an employer using it (and partly for that reason).
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Old 07-02-2010, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Australasia
310 posts, read 378,852 times
Reputation: 330
Well, I work with a nurse who is at least 65 yrs ...and she is brilliant, runs circles around most.
Sometimes, she moves a little slower than many but she always anticipates any issues and is prepared
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Old 07-02-2010, 07:28 AM
 
Location: On our boat!
5,684 posts, read 10,543,804 times
Reputation: 3197
Another thing about this "50's/60's" age bracket, not all of us have a college degree and that can definitely hurt today! My wife use to work in the Accounting Dept for a major communications company as a Staff Accountant. She HAD to have a Bachelor's Degree to get the job.....of which she has. We were are a local hometown parade talking to a lady in her late 40's who was searching for an Accounting job. My wife told her to go to the company she works for and apply. I immediately looked at the lady and asked "do you have a Bachelors Degree in Business/Accounting?", she said "no". I looked at my wife and my wife told her "sorry, but the company and my manager won't hire anyone into the Accounting Dept that doesn't have a Bachelor's Degree." This lady looked at us and said, "what ever happened to good old years of experience was all that was needed?" And, now (2010) my wife is looking for a permanent type job and finding out that more and more places are now asking for the CPA certification, plus a Bachelor's Degree. We are both too old and lack finances to go after college degrees and certifications anymore. Going after a "high education" at our age is ridiculous when this generation of interviewers find it hard (or simply DON'T WANT TO) hire someone in our age bracket in the first place!
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Old 07-02-2010, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,214,285 times
Reputation: 16633
As long as they're physically and mentally capable of performing the items in the job description, I'd probably hire a 60-year-old instead of a 20-year-old. The older person has more life experience, has already gone through their drama, has either already "found themselves" or stopped bothering to look. They've already had their kids, who have already grown up and don't need mom or dad to take time off from work to feed them chicken soup. They probably already own their home outright, or are already living in a nice retirement community of their peers, and don't need to worry much about debt anymore.

They're close to social security collection time, which means soon, they'll be needing only part time work (if you make too much, you can't collect your social security checks), and they won't be needing raises. Most seniors want to feel like they're still productive, useful, and contributory to society. They want to feel needed. They make terrific employees because they bring all that into their work ethic.
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:41 AM
 
Location: On our boat!
5,684 posts, read 10,543,804 times
Reputation: 3197
I like your reply, BUT this word could bother me......

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
As long as they're physically and mentally capable of performing the items in the job description, I'd probably hire a 60-year-old instead of a 20-year-old. The older person has more life experience, has already gone through their drama, has either already "found themselves" or stopped bothering to look. They've already had their kids, who have already grown up and don't need mom or dad to take time off from work to feed them chicken soup. They probably already own their home outright, or are already living in a nice retirement community of their peers, and don't need to worry much about debt anymore.

They're close to social security collection time, which means soon, they'll be needing only part time work (if you make too much, you can't collect your social security checks), and they won't be needing raises. Most seniors want to feel like they're still productive, useful, and contributory to society. They want to feel needed. They make terrific employees because they bring all that into their work ethic.
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Moon Over Palmettos
5,970 posts, read 12,416,822 times
Reputation: 4780
My husband who is self-employed, just hired a part-time person over 60, to do Quickbooks and taxes. In fact, I met him yesterday, and seems to be an affable gentleman. He was working out of our home yesterday since hubby could not leave for the office (waiting for installers of satellite and alarm company) and started working at 10 am...never stopped even for meals, despite hubby's offer to pay for his meal. Made one mistake and was completely flabbergasted with himself when hubby caught it. Yeah, I would hire someone like this, humble and possessing impeccable work ethics, so far. If hubby's business picks up, he will turn full time. Hubby also said he was paying for the man's continuing education. Not all is lost on the older worker...just depends on skills, experience and overall attitude to learning new things. Plus, hubby is paying him more per hour than when he was working for himself.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,237 posts, read 27,256,347 times
Reputation: 10607
As long as they can do the job they are being hired for, why not?

I plan to work until the day I die--no retirement for me.
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Old 07-02-2010, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,608 posts, read 6,996,701 times
Reputation: 2985
Quote:
Originally Posted by bibit612 View Post
My husband who is self-employed, just hired a part-time person over 60, to do Quickbooks and taxes. In fact, I met him yesterday, and seems to be an affable gentleman.
You're one of the smarter business owners, that hires an older experienced worker to do those taske.
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Old 07-02-2010, 01:17 PM
 
6,454 posts, read 5,789,753 times
Reputation: 6543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post
These two things can be seen as a detriment by some employers: if you "don't need the money", there can be a presumption that the minute you're asked to do something you don't want to, you'll quit, or at least that you'll complain a lot because, y'know, you don't need the money so what do you have to lose. I remember encountering this attitude in previous managers of mine when I was a junior manager. Yet another stereotype about the aged (or, in this case, about anyone who is "set" financially).

None of which has anything to do with age. There are 25-year-olds to whom this applies and 65-year-olds to whom it does not.
I am fortunate in that I very much doubt there's not a single 25 year old in the world that can do what I do. There might be a very small handful under 30 but I doubt the number is more than 20 or so.

It takes 10 years to obtain full certification and there is serious talk of raising that to 15 years. This would mean about the youngest you will run across would be in their mid 30's and right now the average age appears to be mid 40's. Someone 35 would be considered a young spring chicken.
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