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Old 08-17-2010, 04:51 PM
 
54 posts, read 81,129 times
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I need to give my notice at work and I wanted to confirm that one week is allowed. I feel terrible and awful, but, it has to be done. Is a verbal ok>
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Old 08-17-2010, 05:13 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,748,500 times
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You can give whatever notice you want. The comapny may not like giving only one week and may give a bad reference in the future.

I once worked at a bank and only gave one week when i left. In my exit interview, they said I was not eligible for rehire because I didn't give two weeks. Luckily for me, the bank is now out of business, so that isn't a problem.
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Old 08-17-2010, 06:30 PM
 
134 posts, read 501,324 times
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Legally, yes. Ethically, generally not. (Usually a 2-week notice is acceptable) But, if you talk to your employer and explain your situation, they may be ok with it anyway
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 6,404,330 times
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I always heard that if you were paid every week one week was good, but if you were paid every two weeks you had to give two weeks. I don't know if this is true or not though
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:30 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
1,997 posts, read 2,309,702 times
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Giving notice is a courtesy. Most states have employment at will. Do they give you notice when they lay you off or fire you? It depends on the relationship you have with this employer. If it was a normal human who did not horribly mistreat or abuse you, then you should give 2 weeks and part nicely. If your circumstances only allow you to give 1 week, then explain that and give 1 week. If it was a Jeckyll and Hyde, nasty employer, I would resign on the spot while presenting such employer with a nebulous one sentence resignation letter. In the last case scenario, less is more as they can use it against you. As far as getting a "bad reference," that may be against the law as you have a cause to sue them for slander. It depends what your state laws are.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, trying to leave
1,228 posts, read 1,955,174 times
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I've always heard 2 weeks is the minimum. I had a really bad job in college and quit without any notice. I came in with my uniform, told them I was done and wouldn't finish my week. I actually felt guilty because I knew I put my coworkers in a situation, but my new employer wanted me quickly, I was too young to know what to do, and the job paid far better.

That being said, if your new employer requires you there in a week, or you really can't work that second week, explain the situation, and hold steady. If you can it's the proper thing to do.

You also have to consider your job. Are you in a position that takes very long to fill? Or is it a job that can be trained very quickly for. That type of consideration can make it easier when you are talking to your boss.

Don't do it verbally. Well, tell your manager this is my resignation, and write them a letter. Be nice in the letter. If you are rude in the letter it will go to HR, and guarantee you a bad reference - Or at best no reference.

It's weird, I have one job (at a gas station) that asked for 5 weeks. I figured out why - Most people started looking for a new job straight away, so 5 weeks was about how long anyone lasted.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:35 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
1,997 posts, read 2,309,702 times
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Seriously, what do most references consist of? Dates of hire and separation, job title and some basic questions? I don't think they can even discuss salary, reasons for termination/separation. You can have a friend pose as an employer and call them to see what they actually say or not say. Employers realize that they can't say whatever is on their minds, they have to follow the legal guidelines when giving references.If you find someone is talking smack about you behind your back, write them a letter noting this in detail and ask them to "stop." I know some who have done this. You can even go as far as blacklist someone on the Internet if you want to "throw some flames" back.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, trying to leave
1,228 posts, read 1,955,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystique13 View Post
As far as getting a "bad reference," that may be against the law as you have a cause to sue them for slander. It depends what your state laws are.
This bugs me. You can't just sue someone for slander because they are mean to you. What they say has to be false - So a bad reference is NEVER illegal, unless they lie. And how do you find out that they lied? It's not they'll tell you what they said if you got a bad reference.

The "slander" route is not actually an option. If I were a hiring manager and someone came to me and said that they would sue me for slander if I gave a bad reference, guess what the first thing I would say when they called me would be? "Mr. X has instructed me that he would sue for slander if I gave my opinion of him, so I'm sorry I can't give you any information today."
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:39 PM
 
Location: The City That Never Sleeps
1,997 posts, read 2,309,702 times
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This is America and the worker has rights. You just have to know which ones and where. Of course the employers would have you believe you are still living in the days of the Carnegie steel mines, even though now it's the cubicle farm, not the mines. They always try to brainwash people that they are holding all the cards. That's BS. Do what you need to do. Letter writing is always the norm when resigning regardless of the circumstances. You also have a copy for yourself as proof. There are tons of samples of resignation letters on the 'Net. Don't let this situation stop you from living your life and doing what you need to do.
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:41 PM
 
4,806 posts, read 12,058,471 times
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Thing is, your resignation is the last thing your employer is going to remember about you. Do you want to leave a bad taste in their mouth? If you don't mind doing that, then give them a week, a day, whatever you want.

But keep in mind, how you conduct yourself during your resignation and during your last few weeks is part of your work performance, just as everything up to this date is part of your work performance. When a future employer calls for a reference, they will respond about your entire work performance, up to and including your resignation and final days. In fact your resignation will be fresh in their mind so it will probably weigh more in their response than your performance prior to that. If they feel your conduct during your resignation was less than professional, they would not be lying or breaking the law to say so during a reference check.

Ultimately you have to decide--is your reason for giving only a week's notice important enough to jeopardize your reference?
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