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Old 11-15-2010, 06:23 AM
 
2,371 posts, read 2,463,019 times
Reputation: 1737
Default Part time job....What to do and How to handle...

Hi All,
Need some really good advice here....Just started a part time job about a month ago....Observed what I was supposed to be doing for the 1st 2 weeks and finally went solo this past weekend....."Pure Disastrous" if you want to describe how I did......So last night I went in and asked the person who was training me to give me feedback and to go over where I went wrong....Needless to say...she said that she was busy and didnt have time to go over anything...While I understand she has a job to do to...I really would have liked to went over where I messed up at... I need to know how to handle this situation...It's one of the those jobs...that you can sit and observe all day long..but until you do it over and over again...you wont pick it up.....Please advise?....
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Old 11-15-2010, 06:53 AM
 
205 posts, read 446,419 times
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I would approach your manager and voice your concerns. Your coworker may be annoyed by the fact that they have to continue to train you and thus making their job more complicated at the same time. I think it IS good though that you at least acknowledged that you aren't fully prepared yet and asked for feedback. You're better of acknowledging that you aren't quite up to speed and asking for further training then you are just going about your job and performing poorly then hearing about it afterward.

I can certainly empathize with you though. I'm in the training phase for TWO retail part time jobs right now. One of them as an Ad Set up person (scanning price signs, determining if they need to be replaced for the new sale, and putting up new ones accordingly) and in the other I will be a cashier. I'm nervous as hell about the cashier job because I am doing my orientation day on Wed, and I'm not even sure if I'll get any regular shifts in before I most likely have to work at store OPENING on Black Friday! I'm already picturing this massive hoard of angry housewifes beating me with Tickle Me Elmo dolls or something as I fumble with the cash register!
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Old 11-15-2010, 06:55 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
20,551 posts, read 22,567,353 times
Reputation: 21431
Is the person who's training you another employee or the employer? If it's another employee then go to the boss and explain the situation just as you've put it here. Don't badmouth the woman who trained you, just explain that you really weren't comfortable working solo, you made mistakes and you need more supervision/training.

In my place I have someone in training come in to observe, just as you experienced. After they get a feel for the general procedures they're then gradually eased into doing the job themselves. Being thrown to the wolves after just observing the procedures doesn't work for either the employer or the employee and I can well understand your frustration. It's really too bad that this woman doesn't have the time to go over things with you and shrugged you off as she did but if she's not willing to properly train you then you need to go further up the ladder to get the help you need. Hope this helps and good luck!
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:07 AM
 
2,371 posts, read 2,463,019 times
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How do I explain to my manager without bad-mouthing my trainer....The person training me is the weekday employee....I would be her backup on weekends.....How would i present it to her boss in a professional manner?
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:12 AM
 
205 posts, read 446,419 times
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I would just tell your boss that you worked solo for your first shift and you didn't quite feel prepared to do the job alone yet and you would like more training to feel comfortable doing the job. Don't mention that you approached your coworker and that she shrugged you off. You don't want to create any additional friction. If you say nothing to your boss then your trainer might be badmouthing YOU by saying that you just can't handle this job, etc. At least by addressing your boss you acknowledge your shortcomings and say that you want help. I think most people would rather have you ask for help then make mistakes.
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Old 11-15-2010, 07:37 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
20,551 posts, read 22,567,353 times
Reputation: 21431
OK, first go back to "Jane" and ask her again to please go over your weekend performance as you don't feel comfortable doing the job by yourself and need to know where you went wrong. If she shrugs you off again, go to your manager.

Tell your manager you'd like to sit down with him/her at a convenient time. Then something along these lines:

"I've got a little problem I'm hoping you can help me with. From a to b I observed the work procedures under Jane's supervision and last weekend I worked solo for the first time. I was really looking forward to taking on the responsibility but unfortunately I quickly realized that I didn't have enough "hands-on" experience and I made several mistakes. I asked Jane twice if she could go over things with me but she said she was too busy. I really want to learn the job properly and know I can do it well with some more experience. Would it be possible for "Jane" to maybe come in on my next shift and just be there to back me up and point out what I'm doing wrong? I'd really appreciate it."

Some people just aren't good at training and "Jane" is probably one of them - and also may have a chip on her shoulder about training anyone period to do her job for fear that that person might end up doing it better than she does. The boss needs to know what's going on as business is business and businesses have to make profits. I've encountered the same thing myself from time to time in my own business and, if the "Jane" in my place is like the "Jane" you're dealing with I step in myself to finish off the training. Good luck!
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