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Old 04-09-2011, 03:22 AM
 
48 posts, read 274,564 times
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I'm filling out a job application and it says I need to answer every question carefully and completely. There are certain questions on the form that do not apply to me. Am I supposed to leave these blank or put n/a?

I've asked several people I know and they've given different answers. Some said I should leave these blank and let the employer fill them in when I'm interviewed. Others said I should simply put n/a so that the employer knows that I've read every question.

I may have a lot of n/a on my application. It asks me to list three (non related) references, but I don't have any. Do I leave that blank or put n/a on the first line?
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:05 AM
 
3,109 posts, read 2,742,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ittle View Post
Others said I should simply put n/a so that the employer knows that I've read every question.

yes. write n/a to indicate you understand each question. n/a might also prompt the employer to ask 'why is xyz not applicable to you?' which will hopefully lead to more questions, etc. (assuming you're an open book and not trying to hide anything, the more questions you're asked, the better), but, and this is a big but, when it comes to references, i would advise: do not write n/a because references are applicable to everyone in my humble opinion. or if you feel like being bold/risky, you can write "see reverse" and then write out an explanation on the back page if it's blank. however, be aware some employers might see that and think "heh, the nerve!" others might think it's you being honest/resourceful .. it's a risk.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tampa
1,133 posts, read 2,540,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grimace8 View Post
yes. write n/a to indicate you understand each question. n/a might also prompt the employer to ask 'why is xyz not applicable to you?' which will hopefully lead to more questions, etc. (assuming you're an open book and not trying to hide anything, the more questions you're asked, the better), but, and this is a big but, when it comes to references, i would advise: do not write n/a because references are applicable to everyone in my humble opinion. or if you feel like being bold/risky, you can write "see reverse" and then write out an explanation on the back page if it's blank. however, be aware some employers might see that and think "heh, the nerve!" others might think it's you being honest/resourceful .. it's a risk.
I agree with this advise.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:47 AM
 
43,017 posts, read 50,723,815 times
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Yep. Grimace said everything that needs to be said.
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Old 04-09-2011, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
10,533 posts, read 14,059,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ittle View Post
It asks me to list three (non related) references, but I don't have any. Do I leave that blank or put n/a on the first line?
Why not just find 3 non related references? I mean where you live is everyone related to you? You have no one that you know other than family members? What about people that you went to school with, church with, live on your street? What about the person that cuts or styles your hair? Have you considered using inlaws with a differant last name? I am assuming that you have never worked before? If you had you could use other co-workers. Make sure to ask them if you can use them as references.
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Old 04-09-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
14,871 posts, read 18,293,404 times
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I agree with the others, and would guess that lack of references will mean
the end of your chances. Whether it's a former co-worker, next door neighbor, or in-law (they are not related) you have to find some people
to use as references. Employers really do call them. I think that talking
to my references made all the difference when I was hired by my current employer. Both of them told me after that the HR person had spent a good 1/2 hour on the phone with them, and both were previous co-workers from previous jobs in other states.
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:12 PM
 
3,109 posts, read 2,742,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
Why not just find 3 non related references? ...Have you considered using inlaws with a differant last name? I am assuming that you have never worked before? If you had you could use other co-workers. Make sure to ask them if you can use them as references.

green text: good advice

purple text: um, i'm not sure this is good advice. what if the employer asks the person, 'so, how do you know (applicant's name)?' the person will need to answer honestly and that will expose the applicant as trying to pull a fast one or that he/she didn't understand the request

orange text: i was wondering the same
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Old 04-09-2011, 05:18 PM
 
43,017 posts, read 50,723,815 times
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If he has never worked before, he can put down ministers, boyscout leaders, teachers, neighbors.

It's not hard to find a reference unless you are the neighborhood's devil child who always beat up the other kids and vandalized property.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:57 PM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
37,792 posts, read 12,193,947 times
Reputation: 34118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ittle View Post
I'm filling out a job application and it says I need to answer every question carefully and completely. There are certain questions on the form that do not apply to me. Am I supposed to leave these blank or put n/a?

I've asked several people I know and they've given different answers. Some said I should leave these blank and let the employer fill them in when I'm interviewed. Others said I should simply put n/a so that the employer knows that I've read every question.

I may have a lot of n/a on my application. It asks me to list three (non related) references, but I don't have any. Do I leave that blank or put n/a on the first line?
I never leave blank lines on my applications ... The "N/A" is an acceptable response to those questions that do not pertain to you.

Edited: I missed the part about references ... Don't put N/A in that section ... Although you may not have any employment references, but what about volunteer work, church leaders, neighbors, etc...
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Old 04-10-2011, 12:47 AM
 
48 posts, read 274,564 times
Reputation: 64
I am in my late 20's and have never had a job and have never gone to college. I don't have any non related references. I can't think of one non related person I could use as a reference. I can't use my high school teachers because that was over seven years ago and they won't remember me. I am extremely shy, bordering on social phobic so I don't usually talk to people. I just stay in my house all the time except to go shopping with relatives. I can't lie and list a relative because the business owner (I sort of know him) would recognize their last name as being related to me.

Suggestions?
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