U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 04-14-2011, 02:13 PM
 
11 posts, read 49,639 times
Reputation: 15
Default How do you know if you have "database management experience"

So I'm applying for a job and one of the requirements is "knowledge and experience with database management". Now this seems like a pretty wide range. I've had experience managing the incoming CD's at a radio station, but it was only in Excel. I've also had experience managing a database of tax customers, but that was in Drake software. I'm not sure what database management actually entails so I'm not sure if I actually have the relevant experience. I haven't used any of the main database management like Raisers Edge or anything like that, just personal programs. Should I just include these things in the cover letter and explain that I have a high aptitude for learning new software or something like that? I don't want to just not apply for the job that I KNOW I can do just because I may not have one of the requirements.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-14-2011, 02:41 PM
 
1,999 posts, read 2,423,178 times
Reputation: 1561
Depending on what kind of job you are applying for-- if you don't know what this means then chances are you are not qualified for the position.

Database management in the context of my world means maintaining and supporting a database much like Oracle for example. This includes upgrading the database, creating new data structures/tables, querying and creating reports, involved in security prevention and measures, and there are more tasks-- like database optimization, etc etc.

Database management is generally skills you learn in school or on the job-- it is not just learning how to use a new software like Excel.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2011, 02:48 PM
 
1,448 posts, read 1,575,793 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovetheduns View Post
Depending on what kind of job you are applying for-- if you don't know what this means then chances are you are not qualified for the position.

Database management in the context of my world means maintaining and supporting a database much like Oracle for example. This includes upgrading the database, creating new data structures/tables, querying and creating reports, involved in security prevention and measures, and there are more tasks-- like database optimization, etc etc.

Database management is generally skills you learn in school or on the job-- it is not just learning how to use a new software like Excel.
Chances are, the job is talking about an Online databse. Oracle, XML, or SQL.

If they wanted Excel, they would have said it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 07:20 PM
 
147 posts, read 223,426 times
Reputation: 109
I agree with the others. If you are using excel, most likely just keeping track of data on spreadsheet. It is not "database management experience"
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 07:33 PM
 
4,806 posts, read 10,883,273 times
Reputation: 4543
If you don't know if you have the requisite experience, then you don't have it.

Excel is a spreadsheet software, not a database.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2011, 09:40 PM
 
162 posts, read 325,995 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by abrownan View Post
So I'm applying for a job and one of the requirements is "knowledge and experience with database management". Now this seems like a pretty wide range. I've had experience managing the incoming CD's at a radio station, but it was only in Excel. I've also had experience managing a database of tax customers, but that was in Drake software. I'm not sure what database management actually entails so I'm not sure if I actually have the relevant experience. I haven't used any of the main database management like Raisers Edge or anything like that, just personal programs. Should I just include these things in the cover letter and explain that I have a high aptitude for learning new software or something like that? I don't want to just not apply for the job that I KNOW I can do just because I may not have one of the requirements.
My company considers the "database" anything that is in the V drive, Z drive, C drive etc. It is Excel once you get in there and you "manage" the database (in charge of all the reports in that database, getting them out to people to look at, and keep it all updated) But it can really depend job to job. I'm sure they use some type of software, that I'm unaware of to create this stuff, but I only manage the database, I don't create it..with that said, if you don't understand something in the job description, 9 times out of 10 you probably don't know how to do it. There's no harm in adding your experiences to the cover letter though and giving it a try!! Good luck!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 12:47 AM
 
228 posts, read 511,314 times
Reputation: 124
Unless this company is completely inept at describing their positions, your post makes it clear that you are not qualified for this job at all. You are talking about using high-level point-and-click software packages that require little expertise to learn and use. As far as I can tell, you don't even know what a database management system is. From what I can discern, Raiser's Edge is just some fund-raising software package.

Database administrators are typically going to have a technical degree (computer science, management information systems, etc.) and/or a bunch of high-level certifications. They need to have a thorough understanding of:

1.) SQL Queries
2.) Stored procedures, User-defined functions, Triggers, etc.
3.) Application Development as it relates to interacting with databases
4.) Index optimization
5.) System Security (granting/restricting rights to certain users and processes)
6.) Managing backups
7.) Guaranteeing atomicity
....and it goes on. I'm not even scratching the surface here.

Does the job mention something like Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, mySQL, PostgreSQL, or even Access? If so, move on to something you're qualified for.

And it doesn't matter how high of an aptitude you have for learning software. If you know nothing about databases or programming, you are going to be in completely over your head and no company is going to have the patience to train you for years when there are plenty of qualified applicants with the knowledge and expertise to do the job.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 12:58 AM
 
228 posts, read 511,314 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by student_101 View Post
My company considers the "database" anything that is in the V drive, Z drive, C drive etc. It is Excel once you get in there and you "manage" the database (in charge of all the reports in that database, getting them out to people to look at, and keep it all updated) But it can really depend job to job. I'm sure they use some type of software, that I'm unaware of to create this stuff, but I only manage the database, I don't create it..with that said, if you don't understand something in the job description, 9 times out of 10 you probably don't know how to do it. There's no harm in adding your experiences to the cover letter though and giving it a try!! Good luck!
You aren't managing a database. You are editing an Excel spreadsheet on a network drive, which is something that 99% of people in corporate America have done at one point or another. And for your company's sake, I hope they aren't exclusively relying on Excel spreadsheets to store critical business data that needs to be shared amongst multiple employees.

A spreadsheet is a database in the rawest sense. However, this isn't 1980. A "database" typically refers to a group of tables/data stored on an established DBMS system. A "database manager" is typically somebody who knows how to administer one of these systems. A few small companies will probably throw random buzzwords into certain position titles to make them sound more important than they really are, but in my experience, this is becoming less common in the IT sector.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 05:35 PM
 
47,586 posts, read 32,237,646 times
Reputation: 21458
Quote:
Originally Posted by abrownan View Post
So I'm applying for a job and one of the requirements is "knowledge and experience with database management". Now this seems like a pretty wide range. I've had experience managing the incoming CD's at a radio station, but it was only in Excel. I've also had experience managing a database of tax customers, but that was in Drake software. I'm not sure what database management actually entails so I'm not sure if I actually have the relevant experience. I haven't used any of the main database management like Raisers Edge or anything like that, just personal programs. Should I just include these things in the cover letter and explain that I have a high aptitude for learning new software or something like that? I don't want to just not apply for the job that I KNOW I can do just because I may not have one of the requirements.
Yes, if you aren't familiar with Oracle and SQL statements, you probably can't claim to have experience with database management.

Really the data entry people are involved in databases, they enter the records and can maintain the database in a very real sense but that's not what the term means.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2011, 08:41 PM
 
162 posts, read 325,995 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by bighusker View Post
You aren't managing a database. You are editing an Excel spreadsheet on a network drive, which is something that 99% of people in corporate America have done at one point or another. And for your company's sake, I hope they aren't exclusively relying on Excel spreadsheets to store critical business data that needs to be shared amongst multiple employees.

A spreadsheet is a database in the rawest sense. However, this isn't 1980. A "database" typically refers to a group of tables/data stored on an established DBMS system. A "database manager" is typically somebody who knows how to administer one of these systems. A few small companies will probably throw random buzzwords into certain position titles to make them sound more important than they really are, but in my experience, this is becoming less common in the IT sector.
There are people that run programs to update the databases, I just go into Excel formats to get the information. They consider that "managing the database" AKA managing the reports FOR MY POSITION...I'm sure in our IT dept of 200 people someone else does the real management. My point was, if you don't know if you qualify, you don't...
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top