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Old 10-07-2011, 08:37 AM
 
511 posts, read 994,949 times
Reputation: 564

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My wife is a workaholic and at my employer (a major Accounting Firm) there are tons of workaholics. The funny thing is none of them would ever admit that they are true workaholics. They see working 70-100 hours a week as completely normal and just see it as being responsible and valuable.

Here are some things that I notice about the workaholics in my office:

* Most are devoid of personality and appear to have a poor home life and few friends.

* They have an incredible ability to stare into a computer screen for hours and hours and hours without a break. Many never leave their desks or take a lunch.

* They don't think much of their fellow staff members who don't put in the hours they do.

* They tell everyone who will listen how many hours they put into the job and how they were in the office all weekend.

* They confuse the value of long hours and effort with results. Most workaholics actually don't get much more done than people who work 40 hours a week. They instead waste valuable time on silly projects that don't add value to the company, or no one appreciates.

* It takes them two hours to do the same thing an average person would do in one hour. Wheel spinners and perfection instead of results and working smarter not harder.

-------------
What do you think? Want to defend workaholics?
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:04 AM
 
1,090 posts, read 1,731,350 times
Reputation: 686
I've often been called a workaholic, but what you're describing them as is only about 50% true.

I'm more of a workaholic because I work my corporate job then go home to work my side business because it takes effort to build a salary that will replace your current job and I can't tell you how quick I want to be out of this "9-5" (quotations because it's not really just 9-5).
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:08 AM
 
103 posts, read 102,507 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
My wife is a workaholic and at my employer (a major Accounting Firm) there are tons of workaholics. The funny thing is none of them would ever admit that they are true workaholics. They see working 70-100 hours a week as completely normal and just see it as being responsible and valuable.

Here are some things that I notice about the workaholics in my office:

* Most are devoid of personality and appear to have a poor home life and few friends.

* They have an incredible ability to stare into a computer screen for hours and hours and hours without a break. Many never leave their desks or take a lunch.

* They don't think much of their fellow staff members who don't put in the hours they do.

* They tell everyone who will listen how many hours they put into the job and how they were in the office all weekend.

* They confuse the value of long hours and effort with results. Most workaholics actually don't get much more done than people who work 40 hours a week. They instead waste valuable time on silly projects that don't add value to the company, or no one appreciates.

* It takes them two hours to do the same thing an average person would do in one hour. Wheel spinners and perfection instead of results and working smarter not harder.

-------------
What do you think? Want to defend workaholics?
It makes good business sense if you're an entrepreneur.
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:29 AM
 
155 posts, read 85,106 times
Reputation: 323
Quote:
Originally Posted by coors View Post
It makes good business sense if you're an entrepreneur.
I'm not so sure about that. Americans are WAY too obsessed with hours worked. It's results that matter not time worked. I can guarantee that if you look at any workaholic closely you will see that they are "working" so hard to avoid something else in their lives. The "work" takes their mind off their troubles. Yet we praise them because they seem so productive.
Americans need to rethink their work ethic. Obviously it isn't working out so well for us now. Giving employees flexible hours and paying them for results would be a good start.
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,524 posts, read 8,322,094 times
Reputation: 8079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remote_Control View Post
I'm not so sure about that. Americans are WAY too obsessed with hours worked. It's results that matter not time worked. I can guarantee that if you look at any workaholic closely you will see that they are "working" so hard to avoid something else in their lives. The "work" takes their mind off their troubles. Yet we praise them because they seem so productive.
Americans need to rethink their work ethic. Obviously it isn't working out so well for us now. Giving employees flexible hours and paying them for results would be a good start.
I agree with this. Our Controller is like that. My guess after 10 months working in the job, I am thinking she does not have a good marriage and lacks friends. I'll peek in her office, she stay's late but many times she's looking through magizines and thumbing through stuff and just moving at a very slow pace like she's killing time...it seems like on Friday's she stay's even later.
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:41 AM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,524 posts, read 8,322,094 times
Reputation: 8079
Those hours don't seem unusual for a Public Accounting firm, same holds true for Law Firms.

I don't think I want to work that hard while working for someone else. If I work like that I'll be building my own business not someone elses.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
My wife is a workaholic and at my employer (a major Accounting Firm) there are tons of workaholics. The funny thing is none of them would ever admit that they are true workaholics. They see working 70-100 hours a week as completely normal and just see it as being responsible and valuable.

Here are some things that I notice about the workaholics in my office:

* Most are devoid of personality and appear to have a poor home life and few friends.

* They have an incredible ability to stare into a computer screen for hours and hours and hours without a break. Many never leave their desks or take a lunch.

* They don't think much of their fellow staff members who don't put in the hours they do.

* They tell everyone who will listen how many hours they put into the job and how they were in the office all weekend.

* They confuse the value of long hours and effort with results. Most workaholics actually don't get much more done than people who work 40 hours a week. They instead waste valuable time on silly projects that don't add value to the company, or no one appreciates.

* It takes them two hours to do the same thing an average person would do in one hour. Wheel spinners and perfection instead of results and working smarter not harder.

-------------
What do you think? Want to defend workaholics?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Northern Arizona
1,248 posts, read 2,092,884 times
Reputation: 608
I've worked upwards of 75-80 hours a week at one full-time job and two part-time jobs in the past just to make ends meet. Its become so "routine" that I don't really know how to do anything else but work (...or posting about it on an internet message board)

I'm currently working a full-time job and a part-time job in retail (even with a graduate degree). because I'm currently getting paid less at my full-time job than what I made at my last full-time job before leaving to go to grad school (I'll be the first to admit my degree is worthless). Work is life, no matter how demeaning and/or menial it might be and quite frankly, I wouldn't have it any other way. I'm smart enough to stay away from relationships or anything that might hinder my ability to put in hours at the office and be at my manager's beck and call 24/7.
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Old 10-07-2011, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,487 posts, read 10,253,358 times
Reputation: 3758
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
I'm smart enough to stay away from relationships or anything that might hinder my ability to put in hours at the office and be at my manager's beck and call 24/7.
That's pretty extreme, are you serious?

I was a workaholic for many years and still, to an extent, would consider myself one. When I first started working for my current employer (engineering firm), I THREW myself into my work with the hope that eventually, I'd be able to get out of the everyday drudgery and into a position that allows me flexibility. I worked many 12 hour days for the first years and slowly started working my way to my current position that I just received a few months ago.

I'm nowhere near being the top of the corporate latter but the position I currently have I would attribute to those long nights. I now am able to do a good chunk of work in my home office on my Mac. I still go into the office everyday but I can come and go as I please, if I need to leave at 1 pm for some reason, I just go and finish up whatever work I need to accomplish at home.

I worked hard very early in my life so that when I get older, I no longer am tethered to a desk. I can come and go, do work at home on my patio if I please. When I first started, my days were very boring and could drag on but now, I have meetings with the executive directors about implementing new technology. It's much more interesting and allows me the type of work atmosphere that I can thrive in.
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Old 10-07-2011, 11:58 AM
 
2,357 posts, read 1,890,523 times
Reputation: 1194
Isn't there more to life than just work? You can work as many hours as you want, there is still no guarantee of anything (promotion, money etc). I just don't understand this mentality that you have to put in over 50+ hours a week to make it anywhere. Coming and going as you please is nice, but isn't knowing you would be out at 5pm everyday nicer?
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Old 10-07-2011, 12:07 PM
 
977 posts, read 782,600 times
Reputation: 1852
I work just hard enough to do a decent job which is 37.5 hours a week. I do stay later on the rare occasion that that's necessary.

Too many workaholics in America. Work to live, not live to work is how it should be.

It's sad how so many people work so hard for their corporate masters for nothing.
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