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Old 10-11-2011, 10:22 AM
 
155 posts, read 192,667 times
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Why are Americans so in love with college education? With all these "educated" people running around with credentials and thousands of dollars in student debt shouldn't things in this country be getting BETTER? I talk to college educated people and they don't seem all that smart or enlightened to me. 50 years ago hardly anybody had a degree and this country was an economic powerhouse.
Parents, high school, the media all trumpet college as though it is the solution to every problem. It clearly isn't solving our problems as a nation. But the beast must be fed. Why do we keep doing the same things over and over again?
And everybody and their sister now has a degree. How can employers say that there are not enough educated people to fill jobs?
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:26 AM
 
2,282 posts, read 3,029,632 times
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Oh look, another thread taking a swipe at college education. *Yawn*.

If someone doesn't find any benefit in attaining secondary education, then just don't go to college.

Education is more about personal achievement than just making $$$.

An educated workforce is typically more efficient and productive than a non-educated workforce.

If you're running into college educated folks that seem like idiots, that's probably more of a reflection of their work ethic or intellectual aptitude than it is about the education that was provided to them.
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
728 posts, read 1,036,423 times
Reputation: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remote_Control View Post
Why are Americans so in love with college education? With all these "educated" people running around with credentials and thousands of dollars in student debt shouldn't things in this country be getting BETTER? I talk to college educated people and they don't seem all that smart or enlightened to me. 50 years ago hardly anybody had a degree and this country was an economic powerhouse.
Parents, high school, the media all trumpet college as though it is the solution to every problem. It clearly isn't solving our problems as a nation. But the beast must be fed. Why do we keep doing the same things over and over again?
And everybody and their sister now has a degree. How can employers say that there are not enough educated people to fill jobs?
Education is different than work experience. However, most places are looking for someone with a BS degree and 5+ years experience. At least this what my job search looks like. I don't have a degree, but I have at least 5 years experience.

Now what you're NOT seeing is the change of how the whole world is getting an education. A lot of the jobs that can be done on a computer is being done over-seas. A lot of the low education jobs; like general labor, is being taken by immigrants or out sourced. Where the US was the powerhouse of jobs, companies are finding it cheaper to just give to people in India for a fraction of the hourly rate. All these companies only see how much money they can save or make.
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:38 AM
 
4,933 posts, read 6,645,681 times
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Thats because most "good jobs" at "good companies" require at least a bachelor's degree to get ur foot in the door.

hence the reason lots of people attend college, so they can get these dream jobs lol.

I went to college and quite personally loved it. Not just academically, but socially too. I learned a lot and I also made connections with alll sorts of people, had a blast doing it and would never trade the experience for anything.

LOVE college/
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Old 10-11-2011, 10:51 AM
 
3,286 posts, read 6,115,716 times
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Amen.

My grandfather was a tobacco salesman with a HS education, and he didn't have any problems supporting his family. His wife never worked either.

College is an extended vacation for most kids. They spend 4-6 years partying and sleeping in every day, and most end up with a useless fluff degree. Unless you become something along the lines of a doctor, attorney, accountant, or lawyer, a college education is hardly the key to becoming rich. Most college students accumulate $20k-$40k in debt and get a mediocre job after graduating, so I really don't see how the cost-benefit relationship is all that great unless you are pursuing a solid profession. And let's face it, most kids really aren't material for a professional career as an engineer, doctor, lawyer, etc.
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 37,470,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
I went to college and quite personally loved it. Not just academically, but socially too.
Wait, there was an acedemics part to college? I have no memory of that.
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:26 AM
 
48,522 posts, read 79,343,372 times
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It really depends on the person. Some go to college because they are interested in the study more than moeny. pothers just lok at the difference that a degree actually pays overall compared to no degree or even now in numbers unemployed differences.I know that my college degree certainly paid off looking back as I am now retired.I have a friend who did just as well without one;but he spent years at 12 hours a day runnig his own business and never made a decent salary until he was 30 with the expense.
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Earth
3,614 posts, read 3,653,225 times
Reputation: 1724
I think too many people over the years were told to just 'go to college and get a degree, any degree'. This led to people graduating with bachelor of arts degrees in sewing or hula-hooping....then they're amazed when they can't get work. Getting a 'relevant' degree that can be tangibly applied in the real world is key.

Also, the job market is shifting, and more than ever, research into the viability of your degree in relation to long-term job/career prospects is paramount. I went to college over 12 years ago...this was when I was told to go into either IT or accounting. 12 years later, both fields are over-saturated and being sent overseas. The reality is, may of these degrees you're going into debt for have a shelf-life. At some point you're either going to switch careers, or require further education to advance in the one you're currently in.

Last edited by Roman77; 10-11-2011 at 11:47 AM..
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:40 AM
 
Location: 60630
11,352 posts, read 16,526,274 times
Reputation: 10241
I understand what the OP is saying. People seems to think that a college degree is the answer to everything. They go and get thousands of thousands in student loan and than they end up with a low paying job in the end, or no job at all. Almost half the people I work with at my retail job all have degrees in business, but they work in retail as sales clerks.
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Old 10-11-2011, 11:44 AM
 
9,156 posts, read 15,151,757 times
Reputation: 16577
Quote:
Originally Posted by statisticsnerd View Post
Amen.

My grandfather was a tobacco salesman with a HS education, and he didn't have any problems supporting his family. His wife never worked either.

College is an extended vacation for most kids. They spend 4-6 years partying and sleeping in every day, and most end up with a useless fluff degree. Unless you become something along the lines of a doctor, attorney, accountant, or lawyer, a college education is hardly the key to becoming rich. Most college students accumulate $20k-$40k in debt and get a mediocre job after graduating, so I really don't see how the cost-benefit relationship is all that great unless you are pursuing a solid profession. And let's face it, most kids really aren't material for a professional career as an engineer, doctor, lawyer, etc.

And do you think that would work in 2011?

My grandfather had an eighth grade education, raised a family, and had a stay-at-home wife. I am not foolish enough to think that is a good game plan now.
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