U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,522,326 times
Reputation: 2160

Advertisements

There are few real entry level jobs left in America in any field. I graduated college two years ago with a degree in graphic design. After going to 7+ plus interviews, I soon found out that employers were going with seasoned career veterans with years of work experience. I had a good internship under my belt prior to graduation. As a result of my tough job search, I got creative. I started putting up ad's on craigslist for cheap or even free web design/development services. In effect, I have had a handful of steady web design clients for the past year or so. The downfall is that I have been paid little to nothing for my countless hours of work. I had a job interview for a job in my field for the first time in a year last week. The job was at an IT talent placement agency where IT people are hooked up with multiple different companies in the area. They told me to wait a few weeks while they try to find a good fit for me. I really hope that this job opportunity works out. I have had my hopes crushed in every other job interview/opportunity in my field.

I am lucky that I have zero student loan debt because my childless aunt, who is a doctor, paid for my education in full. I am also lucky that I also am able to live with my mother, although finances are running low. But how is a fresh grad expected to survive these days? Not everyone can afford to work for free for a year or two simply to gain work experience. It also doesn't help that many recent college grads who do end up getting work in their field end up only making $10 an hour. And this is a common wage for majors all across the board. This is a nightmare when compounded with student loan debt and a rising cost of living. Also, you will be competing with dozens to hundreds, or maybe even thousands, of other people when trying to land any job let alone a college degree job these days.

College Degree = $10-Hour Job - Forbes

I am not lazy. I applied to jobs everywhere. I am used to working crap low-status jobs my whole life and was not adverse to working those types of jobs. Even a job as a janitor requires at least one year previous work experience. Millions of college grads are being set up to fail these days.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:38 AM
 
Location: In the loop
370 posts, read 1,317,459 times
Reputation: 656
Well, I have to say to you that it does seem "unfair" but I see jobs asking for 3-5 years experience or more or supervisory work paying 10 dollars an hour. Easily these jobs "SHOULD PAY" 15 or 20 but they don't...

But if you stick with a company, you will get increases. You have to show your value to them.

It's a new world. You, like every other college grad, back to work mom, or long term unemployed person have to deal with it until it gets better.

I have a MS degree but I have worked for as little as $6.50 an hour. I know when I go back to work I will be back in the 10 dollar an hour pile unless I work for myself.

If you are just starting out you have to either have a skill set that put you over the top of others, know someone to hook you up, or just keep pegging away at whatever job you get until they give you increases or you get experience.

Good luck.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:45 AM
 
3,672 posts, read 6,754,135 times
Reputation: 4253
there are still plenty of "real" entry level jobs. there are just more grads than jobs. the further out you get from graduation the harder it gets...best to start searching the beginning of senior year
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:49 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 59,049,169 times
Reputation: 13125
You've only been on seven interviews in two years?

Either you are being too picky, you live in the middle of Alaska, or there's something wrong with your resume/cover letter writing ability/etc.

I'd start with asking someone to look at your resume and figure out how to make yourself more marketable to an employer. I'd also do a mock interview with someone that will give your constructive feedback.

I'd also look at other fields that you could apply your skills to, including advertising or marketing and perhaps seek an internship.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 09:49 AM
 
7,493 posts, read 11,106,434 times
Reputation: 7394
I agree, it's very tough out there. It's tough for everybody; tough for older folks, it's even tough for people who have the right amount of experience to get a job. For younger people just beginning their careers it's the worst.

Some companies used to forego the degree for more experience but I'm not sure about that anymore. Employers just have their pick I guess.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 01:57 PM
 
23 posts, read 92,302 times
Reputation: 64
Entry level jobs still exist but they're only hiring robots for them nowadays. Call centre people being replaced by internet processing, for example. Bank tellers replaced by ATMs. Grocery cashiers are being replaced by those do it yourself tills. And there are fully automated fast food restaurants. You're starting to see this sort of thing in places like Walmart too.

It's already possible to have robotic construction workers. That entire industry can be automated in a few years. No construction workers. There are already fully automated trains. Cars and trucks can be fully automated. There's all kinds of examples.

And it's not just manual labour and the service industry. Lawyers are being replaced by automation. Struggling lawyers used to do documentation work and that's all being scanned into computers now and some program reads and corrects them. There's really loads of examples.

Something drastic is going to have to happen. With all these jobs being replaced by robots, a new system is going to have to be devised. You can't have a system where people exchange labor for money when you have 50% unemployment. And this isn't stuff that's going to happen in the distant future. This is happening now and it's been happening for decades.

So I wouldn't worry about it too much. Try to find a job but don't get too down on yourself if you don't find anything. I'd imagine that the tipping point for this robotic economy isn't too far away. Try to ride it out as best you can. If we can get a system where things are properly distributed, letting the robots do all the work will actually be a good thing. You can kick back in your underpants all day and do your own thing. Let the robots do all the work.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 02:37 PM
 
26,140 posts, read 13,067,942 times
Reputation: 7731
I am going to give a complete different perspective.

What you are saying is incorrect. I say that because you have been to interviews. If you hadn't been to any interviews, I might agree with you.

I highly doubt you have good interview skills. A person with good interview skills should be able to get 2 offers out of 3 interviews. You need to seriously examine your interview skills.

Keep in mind, when they call you for interview, you are already 30% there. It is up to you NOT to blow the other 70% away. The company wants to hire you already; otherwise they wouldn't ask you to come for interview. When you come for interview, they are looking for confirmations to HIRE you not to fail you.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 02:47 PM
 
1,392 posts, read 2,011,408 times
Reputation: 983
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
I am going to give a complete different perspective.

What you are saying is incorrect. I say that because you have been to interviews. If you hadn't been to any interviews, I might agree with you.

I highly doubt you have good interview skills. A person with good interview skills should be able to get 2 offers out of 3 interviews. You need to seriously examine your interview skills.

Keep in mind, when they call you for interview, you are already 30% there. It is up to you NOT to blow the other 70% away. The company wants to hire you already; otherwise they wouldn't ask you to come for interview. When you come for interview, they are looking for confirmations to HIRE you not to fail you.
You are really overestimating the importance of interviewing skills. In many cases, the decision to hire a specific person has already been made before the interview has even started. The experiences and skills on the resume are just as important and many times, hiring managers are willing to overlook mediocre interviews and hire the candidate just based on the strength of the resume/accomplishments alone. It is true that having good interview skills is crucial but they aren't the sole determinant of whether the candidate is hired.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: broke leftist craphole Illizuela
10,339 posts, read 16,047,683 times
Reputation: 20186
Quote:
Originally Posted by X14Freak View Post
You are really overestimating the importance of interviewing skills. In many cases, the decision to hire a specific person has already been made before the interview has even started. The experiences and skills on the resume are just as important and many times, hiring managers are willing to overlook mediocre interviews and hire the candidate just based on the strength of the resume/accomplishments alone. It is true that having good interview skills are crucial but they aren't the sole determinant of whether the candidate is hired.
I have actually found that not to be the case. HR "professionals" have successful convinced most managers that how people answer retarded psychobabble is more important than their knowledge skills and abilities. As a result, most managers will pass up a person perfectly qualified for a position in favor of a lackluster candidate who can BS his way through an interview very well. It is stupid and I've personally seen and had to help deal with the fall out when they hire technical candidates this way.

Frankly over the past few years as HR has become more involved in directing how candidates are hired we've seen rudeness reach epidemic levels and companies make the news with morally repugnant behavior all the while constantly complaining they cannot get qualified candidates.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 03:05 PM
 
Location: In the loop
370 posts, read 1,317,459 times
Reputation: 656
Can't rep you again, Chemist, but I agree.

This cult of HR has ruined the process applying for job. That and and the internet.

I'm not a techno-fossil. I just think it's too easy to hide behind computers now. I remember how they used to do it, and no it was not ideal, but at least HR "professionals" knew their places--filing papers, taking care of insurance, and other paperwork. They didn't act like they were bestowing favors as they dangled the possibilty of work over your head in interviews.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top