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Unread 03-05-2012, 08:36 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
574 posts, read 580,734 times
Reputation: 524
Default Lie about your current/previous salary?

When interviewing for a new job, what are your opinions on lying about your previous/current salary? Do you take bonuses into account?

I hate telling them my previous salary for the following reasons:

  • They will try to match it if you're currently unemployed, due to the tough economy they know you'll take it.
  • They probably won't go much higher than your previous number. Then you're stuck in a specific salary, as long as the economy stays bad.
That's why I've decided to lie and add more for my next interview. I'm currently employed, so I feel like I have the luxury of demanding more without fearing that I'll get rejected. If I get rejected, oh well I still have a job.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 09:44 AM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,201,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nudetypist View Post
When interviewing for a new job, what are your opinions on lying about your previous/current salary? Do you take bonuses into account?

I hate telling them my previous salary for the following reasons:

  • They will try to match it if you're currently unemployed, due to the tough economy they know you'll take it.
  • They probably won't go much higher than your previous number. Then you're stuck in a specific salary, as long as the economy stays bad.
That's why I've decided to lie and add more for my next interview. I'm currently employed, so I feel like I have the luxury of demanding more without fearing that I'll get rejected. If I get rejected, oh well I still have a job.
If you're going to lie, know the market. If you are being underpaid for your title/experience/location, I don't see a big deal in bumping that number up. Its not legal for other companies to ask your current salary anyway, when calling references. Besides, if you're looking for another job while employed, you probably won't be listing your current manager as a reference anyway.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 10:24 AM
 
3,525 posts, read 3,568,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
If you're going to lie, know the market. If you are being underpaid for your title/experience/location, I don't see a big deal in bumping that number up. Its not legal for other companies to ask your current salary anyway, when calling references. Besides, if you're looking for another job while employed, you probably won't be listing your current manager as a reference anyway.
It's not illegal for a company to call and ask the HR department for your current salary, especially if they have your written authorization, which is given on the application. And since alot of the time the checks happen after the offer, yes this could be very risky for you.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 10:28 AM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,201,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdm2008 View Post
It's not illegal for a company to call and ask the HR department for your current salary, especially if they have your written authorization, which is given on the application. And since alot of the time the checks happen after the offer, yes this could be very risky for you.
Well, I always put that they can't contact my current place of employment. If they ask why, I state that my current employer doesn't know that I'm looking.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
574 posts, read 580,734 times
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Well, it wouldn't be much of a lie if I include my bonus into my annual income. I'm just wondering if it's common practice for people to include their bonuses as well.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 12:30 PM
 
4,557 posts, read 1,758,311 times
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total compensation is what you need to say.

Simply state "My total compensation is $X" would be sufficient. You can add both salary and bonus. I always say "My compensation is $X plus y% of bonus." They immediately know they need to come close to this satisfy me.

Keep in mind that an employer isn't in the business of lowballing everybody. They want to get the best talent at the lowest price but they don't want the talent to leave either.

It gets down to the market rate. If your market rate is $50,000, you will get $50,000 regardless how you play it. Would they go slightly lower? Of course. If your range is $45,000-$55,000, you will likely get $45,000.

It is then up to you to accept it.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 01:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
It gets down to the market rate. If your market rate is $50,000, you will get $50,000 regardless how you play it. Would they go slightly lower? Of course. If your range is $45,000-$55,000, you will likely get $45,000.
Not sure if I agree with that. Often times, employers use past salary ranges rather as an indicator of your market rate. This completely discounts what you've actually done, what you can do in the new role, along with unique circumstances that may have come into play that cause your salary to be lower.

Market rate is what the posted salary for that location/job title is from sources such as Salary.com or Glassdoor.com. If the employer has deemed that you can do the job, it should be based on market rate and not on previous salary. If you've been low-balled in the past, I don't find it unreasonable to exaggerate your current salary, so that you are not low balled again.
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Unread 03-05-2012, 01:54 PM
 
4,557 posts, read 1,758,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
Not sure if I agree with that. Often times, employers use past salary ranges rather as an indicator of your market rate. This completely discounts what you've actually done, what you can do in the new role, along with unique circumstances that may have come into play that cause your salary to be lower.

Market rate is what the posted salary for that location/job title is from sources such as Salary.com or Glassdoor.com. If the employer has deemed that you can do the job, it should be based on market rate and not on previous salary. If you've been low-balled in the past, I don't find it unreasonable to exaggerate your current salary, so that you are not low balled again.
You are taking an unnecessary risk. Keep in mind, it is easy to verify your salary. Some companies will straight out ask your last year's W4. When you work for someone, there isn't much privacy left.

Firstly, you need to know your market rate.

Secondly, when someone give you a lowball offer and you accept it, it is not lowball anymore but a fair trade. Keep in mind, it's a free market and we still have some freedom left which includes NOT being forced to work for a particular employer. If you think it's too low, you can negotiate the salary or reject the offer. If you need them more than they need you, supply and demand would determine your final price. You can always re-negotiate once you are hired.

Lying is not good and it will come back and bite you.
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Unread 03-06-2012, 08:42 AM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,201,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeexplorer View Post
You are taking an unnecessary risk. Keep in mind, it is easy to verify your salary. Some companies will straight out ask your last year's W4. When you work for someone, there isn't much privacy left.
Well, I would never offer up my tax forms to a company where I'm a candidate.
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Unread 03-06-2012, 08:46 AM
 
4,557 posts, read 1,758,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
Well, I would never offer up my tax forms to a company where I'm a candidate.
Like if they care about you. :-)
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