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Old 04-05-2012, 09:21 PM
 
16,768 posts, read 7,403,780 times
Reputation: 6162

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No Tara0815, you are not weird. There are millions unemployed doing most everything they should, but the reality is we are in a situation that will leave a large percentage no wonderful, fairy tale ending. The numbers are daunting. Assuming we gain 250k jobs monthly for 4 straight years, that would be 12 million new jobs, BUT population gains alone add 150k per month into the workforce, so the overage of 100k per month would mean 4.8 million of those now unemployed would be employed by 2016. But that would still leave well over 2 million of the 7 million plus remaining from the 8 million job cuts of a few years back.

And the odds are we will have another recession long before 2016; we may enter one simply due to the European governments going broke, as the effects go global.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
2,620 posts, read 1,708,211 times
Reputation: 1746
I took a touchy feeling degree in Geography and Environmental Studies at a large state school.
No hard sciences, no math, lots of writing. But also a 1510/6.0 GRE that landed me multiple full ride grad school offers from top 20 schools in Geography.

I was recruited straight out of school by multiple consulting firms, Google, and several large counties before settling on a county position that paid more than Google. Now that I have 3 years experience, I have dozens of companies every year initiate cold contacts to recruit me.

One of my friends was an Art major (at the same large state school)... with a 178 LSAT. Needless to say, she did not have a pay a cent for law school. She's already on a law journal editorial staff, last I knew she was #1 in her class in front of a whole bunch of people who had "hard" undergrad degrees. She is being constantly recruited by major law firms. Her husband was an urban studies major. He also had his law school paid and will graduate at least top 5%.

Don't listen to people who talk about "worthless degrees". It's the person, not the degree, that determines success.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:55 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 2,536,882 times
Reputation: 709
The problem is that everyone who starts law school thinks they're going to be in that top 5%....
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:05 PM
 
5,378 posts, read 11,860,012 times
Reputation: 3358
The OP does not state which area they live in... I have noticed that the geographic area seems to make a big different in job opportunities. There are some states which are WELL above the natl average and have been for years now... (mine is one). So if they are young and single I would consider a relocation for employment to a state with lower unemployment rates.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:29 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,352,502 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
I took a touchy feeling degree in Geography and Environmental Studies at a large state school.
No hard sciences, no math, lots of writing. But also a 1510/6.0 GRE that landed me multiple full ride grad school offers from top 20 schools in Geography.

I was recruited straight out of school by multiple consulting firms, Google, and several large counties before settling on a county position that paid more than Google. Now that I have 3 years experience, I have dozens of companies every year initiate cold contacts to recruit me.

One of my friends was an Art major (at the same large state school)... with a 178 LSAT. Needless to say, she did not have a pay a cent for law school. She's already on a law journal editorial staff, last I knew she was #1 in her class in front of a whole bunch of people who had "hard" undergrad degrees. She is being constantly recruited by major law firms. Her husband was an urban studies major. He also had his law school paid and will graduate at least top 5%.

Don't listen to people who talk about "worthless degrees". It's the person, not the degree, that determines success.
i also know many successful individuals with "worthless" majors and would agree that major is not as important as most people make it out to be, but you're forgetting that the average college student is just not smart enough to get a 170+ on the LSAT or whatever, especially these days when anyone with a pulse can go to college.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:01 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
34,421 posts, read 23,792,329 times
Reputation: 7700
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtn View Post
No Tara0815, you are not weird. There are millions unemployed doing most everything they should, but the reality is we are in a situation that will leave a large percentage no wonderful, fairy tale ending. The numbers are daunting. Assuming we gain 250k jobs monthly for 4 straight years, that would be 12 million new jobs, BUT population gains alone add 150k per month into the workforce, so the overage of 100k per month would mean 4.8 million of those now unemployed would be employed by 2016. But that would still leave well over 2 million of the 7 million plus remaining from the 8 million job cuts of a few years back.

And the odds are we will have another recession long before 2016; we may enter one simply due to the European governments going broke, as the effects go global.
I';m going to report you for trolling because you constantly state negative things but offer no advice.
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Old 04-06-2012, 01:09 AM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
3,998 posts, read 2,696,091 times
Reputation: 3459
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
I';m going to report you for trolling because you constantly state negative things but offer no advice.
i dont think she/he is trolling , think they're just saying reality?
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Old 04-06-2012, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
8,027 posts, read 5,747,517 times
Reputation: 7376
Quote:
Originally Posted by TVandSportsGuy View Post
I';m going to report you for trolling because you constantly state negative things but offer no advice.
People like you are the problem. You expect everyone else to figure out your problems. If your smart enough to get a degree, you should be smart enough to figure out your own way to prosperity. What Bob was giving you was the cold hard facts, so you know what you have to work against, and what you have to work with. Sorry life gets hard sometimes.

And you might want to tone down your expectations about your next job. It probably isn't going to be paying what you are used to. Life is like that sometimes.

One thing Bob did not mention however is the number of babyboomers who will inevitably have to retire sooner or later. Financial constraints are going to force many to continue working past traditional retirement years if they can, but the question is, how many? This is the wild card in the numbers game regarding future employment prospects. Some industries are being forced to train... Not because they want to, but because they have to.
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Old 04-06-2012, 01:11 AM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
3,998 posts, read 2,696,091 times
Reputation: 3459
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
color me pessimistic, call it my cynicism whatever but the whole "hard working, honest young man" just as the " go to college and you will find a good job" are just like the Santa Claus and the boogey man, mythical figures and stories we tell little kids. Their not true in the slightest but everyone enjoys a good story so the myth keeps going.

This is what job searching has taught me so far:

1) Major in the "right" major, that is your accounting, your nursing, engineering etc... Ya I am sorry liberal arts grads unless you want to teach, you are boned

2) Know someone, having an aunt, uncle, friend , cousin in the business will do you more good than all the cover letters, job fairs and resumes in the world

There are times when I really do not know what to do. 25 still at home, loans piling up, searching, no job prospects. In my darkest hours I have had thought about suicide, I don't condone it but I can see the reason for it. Life presses on you so much and never gives anything the depression at times is overwhelming.
me too. i feel like i'm wasting space
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Old 04-06-2012, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Minnesota, USA
7,517 posts, read 8,114,274 times
Reputation: 6007
Quote:
Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
I took a touchy feeling degree in Geography and Environmental Studies at a large state school.
No hard sciences, no math, lots of writing. But also a 1510/6.0 GRE that landed me multiple full ride grad school offers from top 20 schools in Geography.

I was recruited straight out of school by multiple consulting firms, Google, and several large counties before settling on a county position that paid more than Google. Now that I have 3 years experience, I have dozens of companies every year initiate cold contacts to recruit me.

One of my friends was an Art major (at the same large state school)... with a 178 LSAT. Needless to say, she did not have a pay a cent for law school. She's already on a law journal editorial staff, last I knew she was #1 in her class in front of a whole bunch of people who had "hard" undergrad degrees. She is being constantly recruited by major law firms. Her husband was an urban studies major. He also had his law school paid and will graduate at least top 5%.

Don't listen to people who talk about "worthless degrees". It's the person, not the degree, that determines success.
Liberal arts degrees or those that traditionally do not lead to a defined occupation are perfectly "worthy" if you plan on attending graduate school and make it in. I don't think the scores you mentioned are attainable by normal "young, hard-working, honest adults" - their very competitiveness indicates that most people don't have the intelligence (LSAT and GRE are correlated with IQ, to my knowledge) to score that high.

The only thing I can say is that it was probably a lot easier for a young adult to "make it" in their career ten years ago than it is now.
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