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Old 04-26-2012, 05:55 PM
 
5,507 posts, read 5,165,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
The chances, statistically, of you getting a competent person from a good school is higher than the changes of getting a competent person from a lower quality school. But it doesn't eliminate the less likely possibilities.

With more and more people getting degrees nowadays, the quality of the school is a great way to filter out who gets hired. Choosing from a higher quality pool will generate a higher quality team almost all the time.
I had seen a headline about record numbers of people starting college but about the same actually graduating. I have to try and track down that article.
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:54 PM
 
1,999 posts, read 2,449,414 times
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Originally Posted by Gatornation View Post
I had seen a headline about record numbers of people starting college but about the same actually graduating. I have to try and track down that article.
I have posted the results before-- it is just over 30% now which is the most it has been but still not huge jumps.
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:58 PM
 
19,695 posts, read 13,914,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatornation View Post
I had seen a headline about record numbers of people starting college but about the same actually graduating. I have to try and track down that article.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovetheduns View Post
I have posted the results before-- it is just over 30% now which is the most it has been but still not huge jumps.
I'll take your word for it. Either way, a higher quality pool will generate a higher quality team than a lower quality pool will.
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Old 04-26-2012, 09:04 PM
 
6,002 posts, read 4,214,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
With more and more people getting degrees nowadays, the quality of the school is a great way to filter out who gets hired.
It's a way, but it's a pretty poor way.

Quote:
Choosing from a higher quality pool will generate a higher quality team almost all the time.
Assuming you don't do any useful filtering of individuals (as opposed to schools) when hiring. There are very few Ivy graduates, and for the sake of argument we can assume that they're very good on average. There are a LOT of graduates from lesser schools, and while they are not as good on average, they are _not_ strictly worse than Ivy graduates. Even if only 5% of them are comparable to the Ivy graduates, by absolute numbers that's a lot more people. So by filtering based on school, you're missing out on the majority of good candidates.

IMO, employers are doing that; they're refusing to consider anyone who didn't graduate from a top tier school, then crying shortage when they can't find enough people.
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Old 04-26-2012, 10:10 PM
 
19,695 posts, read 13,914,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
It's a way, but it's a pretty poor way.



Assuming you don't do any useful filtering of individuals (as opposed to schools) when hiring. There are very few Ivy graduates, and for the sake of argument we can assume that they're very good on average. There are a LOT of graduates from lesser schools, and while they are not as good on average, they are _not_ strictly worse than Ivy graduates. Even if only 5% of them are comparable to the Ivy graduates, by absolute numbers that's a lot more people. So by filtering based on school, you're missing out on the majority of good candidates.

IMO, employers are doing that; they're refusing to consider anyone who didn't graduate from a top tier school, then crying shortage when they can't find enough people.
Let's say I give you two bags:

Bag 1: 1 gallon in size, has 95% candy, 5% razor blades.
Bag 2: 5 gallons in size, has 5% candy, 95% razor blades.

Which one would you let your child pick a piece of candy from with his/her eyes closed if he/she had to.

Last edited by NJBest; 04-26-2012 at 10:37 PM..
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:50 AM
 
273 posts, read 314,205 times
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Ok....

The vast majority of Ivy or Equivalent grads aren't successful in life -- maybe more successful than the average state school grad but still not successful by standard 1% definitions.

Ivies do two things very well:

1) They use name brand to help students who get average grades in dumb majors (poly sci, econ, history, etc.) to get decent first jobs. If a state school grad does this, he or she is basically screwed in a job search. The Ivy kid can graduate and still get a decent first job. Keyword: decent.

2) They set up kids on the fast track to work in "prestigious" industries, almost all of which are in fee-based industries like consulting, finance, or law. The real economic merits of these industries are also debatable. BTW, finance and law are basically screwed long-term.

In other areas, these schools likely offer no measureable benefit. Compare career outcome for 4.0 engineering student at Harvard vs. Public University. There is likely no long-term difference, and if there is, it is probably because the Harvard kid got roped into the financial industry.
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Old 04-27-2012, 09:23 AM
 
6,002 posts, read 4,214,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Let's say I give you two bags:

Bag 1: 1 gallon in size, has 95% candy, 5% razor blades.
Bag 2: 5 gallons in size, has 5% candy, 95% razor blades.

Which one would you let your child pick a piece of candy from with his/her eyes closed if he/she had to.
Neither of them, of course, I wouldn't let a child reach into a bag with any razor blades in it. But it's more like Bag 2 is 50 gallons in size (so there's more candy in Bag 2 than Bag 1), and employers aren't children, nor reaching in with their eyes closed, nor is everything that's not candy a razor blade.
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:17 AM
 
1,955 posts, read 2,022,897 times
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how does the fact that there are more grads from low-ranked schools refute the fact that the average ivy league grad is more successful than the average tier 3 school grad?
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