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Old 07-01-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
14,067 posts, read 16,413,594 times
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I can understand that you need a job and are trying hard, but why the USPS? You know they are in trouble and laying people off all over, closing post offices and talking about ending Saturday delivery. That has to be one of the least secure places to get a job and hardly seems worth the trouble you are going through.
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Old 07-01-2012, 09:57 PM
 
4,020 posts, read 5,026,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hunter Wold View Post
Actually this is a very unique position. It is for the position of Postmaster/OIC(Officer in charge) of a fairly busy "rural" PO in NM.
Hours vary from 3-5 days/wk and 24-40 hrs/week some OT on Sat.?????????

.
I work for the Post Office and I must say that is a very unusual position for you to get as someone who doesn't already work for the Post Office. There are positions available called Postmaster Relief positions but those are only one day a week (Saturday)at small rural offices and when the regular postmaster is on vacation , but not normally 3-5 days a week. Very odd position.
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Old 07-01-2012, 11:12 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 2,449,183 times
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I agree, but I haven't worked for USPS for nearly 10 years so I thought maybe things had changed. I also worked in a P&DC so I'm not really that familiar with how things are done in the stations.

In general, the Post Office has not really been a place to find full time permanent employment for a very long time now. I made it in during the late Nineties and was very lucky to do so, and I think it was basically a fluke that a group of us made it to regular. It is a decent place to pick up some extra hours for those willing to work hard, but don't ever count on it being anything permanent.
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Old 07-02-2012, 12:14 AM
 
455 posts, read 605,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FOReverxpeace View Post
The post office is definitely one of the most horrible places to work at and I can see why most of the people who work at the PO are bitter. My dad has been working at the PO for 20+ years now and trust me, things are not pretty at home. Management is terrible and degrading and if you were to talk to my father, he would STRONGLY advise you to not take the job. You will be miserable there and there are full of 70-year-olds who haven't retired and still want to keep working, holding the "rookies" down of their jobs. Hours are long, taking vacation days is absolutely hard and you usually have to work overtime, and it's no fun when you work during midnight.
Plus what was the last number out of the post office? -3 billion loss?
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Old 07-02-2012, 08:14 AM
 
3,364 posts, read 5,642,297 times
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I got hired for a rural PO last year. I don't know what happened to your paperwork, but that is strange. I applied online, took the test, got an email with a number to call for an interview, showed up for the interview. Then a couple weeks later, I got another email with a conditional employment letter, got my prints and all the other required docs, which they sent me a prepaid envelope to mail back to them. Showed up for my drug test, then got the letter for orientation (at the main PO for my metro area). Showed up there (which is where they had me complete all the new hire paperwork) and then called the PO Postmaster for my start date. I was hired as a PMR (Post Master Relief). About 2 months later, the PO decided to do away with PMRs and replace them with PSEs. I had to reapply, retest, etc. At that point, I needed a full time position, so I gave my resignation. I'm glad it happened that way, as I didn't want to quit on her because it can take awhile for a rural po to get permission to make a new hire, and the process takes 2-3 months. A PM for a rural post office is usually the only employee (other than the carrier) and doesn't get to take time off or even sick time unless she has a PMR/PSE to cover her/his shift. As the last PMR had quit suddenly on the PM (no surprise, she wasn't a nice person), the PM hadn't had ANY time off in over 6 months, and she had a LOT saved up.

kanhawk - Most PMRs (now PSEs) are new hires. This IS how they do things - go check the USPS website, careers section. They are not regular positions, though you are paid via liteblue, you are given a PO ID/pass, but you are not technically a PO employee. Your working hours are determined by the PM of the rural office you work for. In my case, Sat and Monday mornings (open to lunch time), every morning after a holiday and any other time she wanted to take off. I was working 25-30 hours a week, but they were sporadic and strange hours - as I said, they were based on the PMs whim, and as I needed the money, I had to take what she offered.
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Old 09-03-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
4,466 posts, read 3,599,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskkc View Post
I got hired for a rural PO last year. I don't know what happened to your paperwork, but that is strange. I applied online, took the test, got an email with a number to call for an interview, showed up for the interview. Then a couple weeks later, I got another email with a conditional employment letter, got my prints and all the other required docs, which they sent me a prepaid envelope to mail back to them. Showed up for my drug test, then got the letter for orientation (at the main PO for my metro area). Showed up there (which is where they had me complete all the new hire paperwork) and then called the PO Postmaster for my start date. I was hired as a PMR (Post Master Relief). About 2 months later, the PO decided to do away with PMRs and replace them with PSEs. I had to reapply, retest, etc. At that point, I needed a full time position, so I gave my resignation. I'm glad it happened that way, as I didn't want to quit on her because it can take awhile for a rural po to get permission to make a new hire, and the process takes 2-3 months. A PM for a rural post office is usually the only employee (other than the carrier) and doesn't get to take time off or even sick time unless she has a PMR/PSE to cover her/his shift. As the last PMR had quit suddenly on the PM (no surprise, she wasn't a nice person), the PM hadn't had ANY time off in over 6 months, and she had a LOT saved up.

kanhawk - Most PMRs (now PSEs) are new hires. This IS how they do things - go check the USPS website, careers section. They are not regular positions, though you are paid via liteblue, you are given a PO ID/pass, but you are not technically a PO employee. Your working hours are determined by the PM of the rural office you work for. In my case, Sat and Monday mornings (open to lunch time), every morning after a holiday and any other time she wanted to take off. I was working 25-30 hours a week, but they were sporadic and strange hours - as I said, they were based on the PMs whim, and as I needed the money, I had to take what she offered.
Well pretty much what I have been through. Now I reapplied for the PSE position and took the tests etc and my background check was already done along with my fingerprints (which they said will "expire" in 30 days huh?). So, I have received a conditional letter re: hiring and could not go the the orientation due to the fact it was only 2 weeks out and I had other obligations. So, the orientation has been rescheduled for Oct. in Abq, which is 165 miles away. Then I was told that I would have to go for 2 more weeks of training
in ABQ and elsewhere in New Mexico.
I told them I don't have the $$ to do a lot of traveling and motels etc. The supervision said I would have to pay up front for all including the per diem and would get reimbursed later

She said she would check on this.

Still awaiting a start date and orientation date.

Stay tuned, the plot thickens

HW
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Old 09-03-2012, 01:50 PM
 
6,906 posts, read 4,711,328 times
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The Post Office has changed a lot since the economy crashed, gas prices went through the roof and the internet became more mainstream.

10-15 years ago, all you had to do was take a test (a basic intelligence test) and they would call you in to start if you passed.

The starting wage was $13/hr (2000 dollars) with Public Sector Union Benefits.

Today, the starting wage is $9-$10/hr (2012 dollars) and the Public Sector Union Benefits (at least the BCBS health insurance) are history.

And for all they're taking you through Hunter...
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Old 09-03-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
4,466 posts, read 3,599,932 times
Reputation: 8504
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
The Post Office has changed a lot since the economy crashed, gas prices went through the roof and the internet became more mainstream.

10-15 years ago, all you had to do was take a test (a basic intelligence test) and they would call you in to start if you passed.

The starting wage was $13/hr (2000 dollars) with Public Sector Union Benefits.

Today, the starting wage is $9-$10/hr (2012 dollars) and the Public Sector Union Benefits (at least the BCBS health insurance) are history.

And for all they're taking you through Hunter...
Actually I am going to start at $13.95/hr. No ot.
And about 6-40 hrs/wk depending on the PM.

Later.HW
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Old 09-03-2012, 07:55 PM
 
6,906 posts, read 4,711,328 times
Reputation: 4949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hunter Wold View Post
Actually I am going to start at $13.95/hr. No ot.
And about 6-40 hrs/wk depending on the PM.
Yeah, I just re-read your post and notice you're being hired in for a Postmaster position, which is different. That's like working as a Store Manager for a particular location of a retail/fast food chain.

The positions I referred to were the Mail Clerk/Mail PRocessor/Mail Carrier positions.

I imagine that rate is still much lower than what Postmasters were being paid 10-15 years ago (that $13.95/hr was the starting wage for regular Post Office positions)
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Old 09-04-2012, 01:15 AM
 
30 posts, read 60,180 times
Reputation: 31
Funny, my brother just got a similar position with the PO and was on board after 2 weeks. He has a bachelors degree and was fired from his last job.

Maybe you're not telling us something.
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