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Old 05-31-2012, 02:03 PM
 
634 posts, read 621,708 times
Reputation: 548
Default To anyone in HR: Why do employers not respond after an interview?

I think the title of this thread already asks the question I am going to ask but why do employers not respond after an interview? I specifically address this question to anyone who is a recruiter/hiring manager/HR. Employers not responding isn't anything recent either. I only heard back from less than half the people I interviewed with back in 2005 and 2006. So the question is why no response especially since it only takes a few minutes to type out an email and send it out. I have never received a satisfactory answer when I asked this before to people in HR since they tend to dodge the question. Funny enough, I knew some HR people who were laid off and after they found jobs they continued this trend of ignoring emails and not responding.
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Old 05-31-2012, 02:42 PM
 
Location: MD
3,969 posts, read 1,925,089 times
Reputation: 6404
There really is no good excuse.

I can fully understand why they don't send out a response to everyone who applied - that would probably take too long and be a waste of email, so to speak.

I can also understand why they don't send out individualized responses, since doing so would take forever and leave them open to legal trouble if they say the wrong thing.

That being said, the following minimum requirements should be met:

1) Keep accurate job postings: If a job is cancelled, say so. If a job is a "blue sky" position that'll only be filled if a certain contract is won, say so. Don't clutter up the website with fake jobs that were closed months ago, or which will never be filled because the employer is just window-shopping. Be honest with your job candidates for a change.

Note that I suspect the main reason this isn't done (aside from the fact it might require somebody to do some work and pay attention) is that if all the fake jobs were pulled and all the "window-shopping" jobs were accurately labeled, the number of available positions would plummet, which would harm the illusion of "The Recovery" and cast doubt on the drumbeat of "the unemployed have only themselves to blame."

2) Respond to on-site interviewees: If a candidate gets to an onsite interview, the company owes them an honest response about the job status. No, I'm not expecting a flowery thank-you note or a personalized email, but for Pete's sake, at least tell me what happened to the job?! Geez... we waste hours of time at these places, listen them to blow smoke our rears and sing our praises, get the typical "we'll let you know in a week or two" response, and then - bam! - nothing.

Okay, I understand I didn't get the job, but can you at least tell me WHY!? Was the job cancelled? Did somebody else get it? Was it postponed until conditions are better? Don't just ignore me, act as if the interview never happened, and leave the job up on the website as bait for future desperate suckers who think you're actually hiring! Geez...
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Old 05-31-2012, 03:07 PM
 
997 posts, read 704,957 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler123 View Post
There really is no good excuse.

I can fully understand why they don't send out a response to everyone who applied - that would probably take too long and be a waste of email, so to speak.

I can also understand why they don't send out individualized responses, since doing so would take forever and leave them open to legal trouble if they say the wrong thing.

That being said, the following minimum requirements should be met:

1) Keep accurate job postings: If a job is cancelled, say so. If a job is a "blue sky" position that'll only be filled if a certain contract is won, say so. Don't clutter up the website with fake jobs that were closed months ago, or which will never be filled because the employer is just window-shopping. Be honest with your job candidates for a change.

Note that I suspect the main reason this isn't done (aside from the fact it might require somebody to do some work and pay attention) is that if all the fake jobs were pulled and all the "window-shopping" jobs were accurately labeled, the number of available positions would plummet, which would harm the illusion of "The Recovery" and cast doubt on the drumbeat of "the unemployed have only themselves to blame."

2) Respond to on-site interviewees: If a candidate gets to an onsite interview, the company owes them an honest response about the job status. No, I'm not expecting a flowery thank-you note or a personalized email, but for Pete's sake, at least tell me what happened to the job?! Geez... we waste hours of time at these places, listen them to blow smoke our rears and sing our praises, get the typical "we'll let you know in a week or two" response, and then - bam! - nothing.

Okay, I understand I didn't get the job, but can you at least tell me WHY!? Was the job cancelled? Did somebody else get it? Was it postponed until conditions are better? Don't just ignore me, act as if the interview never happened, and leave the job up on the website as bait for future desperate suckers who think you're actually hiring! Geez...
Really agree with everything here. If a job posting is 30 days old, take it down unless the job is still actually up. If the job posting is a week old and is already filled take it down- no need to build up people with false hope.

And to the interview, if by some mircale I actually get the in person interview at least have the deceny to tell me "no" if I am turned down for the position. That does not mean I need a hand written letter apolgizing profusely etc... just a simple email, heck a quick phone call- I understand you have many candidates I was not the right fit, I don't need a long winded explanation but if at the end of the interview you tell me " We will let you know in 2 weeks" , then let me know in 2 weeks.
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Old 05-31-2012, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Northeastern IL
198 posts, read 197,737 times
Reputation: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler123 View Post
If a candidate gets to an onsite interview, the company owes them an honest response about the job status. No, I'm not expecting a flowery thank-you note or a personalized email, but for Pete's sake, at least tell me what happened to the job?! Geez... we waste hours of time at these places, listen them to blow smoke our rears and sing our praises, get the typical "we'll let you know in a week or two" response, and then - bam! - nothing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
...if by some mircale I actually get the in person interview at least have the deceny to tell me "no" if I am turned down for the position. That does not mean I need a hand written letter apolgizing profusely etc... just a simple email, heck a quick phone call- I understand you have many candidates I was not the right fit, I don't need a long winded explanation but if at the end of the interview you tell me " We will let you know in 2 weeks" , then let me know in 2 weeks.
I agree that I'd rather hear a rejection than silence. But I don't expect a reply anymore because employers just don't bother much anymore. If I have an E-Mail address or phone number, I usually follow up. Sometimes I will hear that they've filled it; other times nothing. But the follow up would at least put me in front of the employer more so than others who've not done so.

Looking for a job today is way different than it was 10, 15, 20 years ago.
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:04 PM
Status: "Back to the grind" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Jollyville
2,724 posts, read 5,507,293 times
Reputation: 2059
I think it's because people don't like to deal with rejection. Our HR department is in India. So, as a hiring manager, you are kind of left on your own after the interviews are set up. Last position I hired for, I sent emails to all the candidates that weren't selected. I seriously doubt if anyone else in my company does that. I just felt like it was the right and decent thing to do. It's not really even encouraged or expected by the management team or onsite HR, which is really too bad.
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Hanover, PA
96 posts, read 105,595 times
Reputation: 154
but what is really frustrating and is BS is the industry advice is to:

Spend time and energy crafting up a cover letter, that isn't just a typical "cut-and-paste" letter..
Spend time on phone screenings.. multiple face-to-face interviews..
Spend time and energy crafting up "thank you" letters ..

To get nothing in return from the prospective employer... ..

The employers and HR departments expect prospective candidates to kiss their *****'s.. then give not one ounce of respect in return..
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:33 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
14,067 posts, read 16,413,594 times
Reputation: 9470
I agree. As a hiring manager I don't respond myself, but everyone interviewed gets a call and everyone that didn't get interviewed gets a letter. It's simple common courtesy and I wish more other companies did it. I had several other interviews before I took this job 3 years ago, and they all called me too, but they were all public agencies so maybe they are better at this than companies.
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:42 PM
 
386 posts, read 534,391 times
Reputation: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I agree. As a hiring manager I don't respond myself, but everyone interviewed gets a call and everyone that didn't get interviewed gets a letter. It's simple common courtesy and I wish more other companies did it. I had several other interviews before I took this job 3 years ago, and they all called me too, but they were all public agencies so maybe they are better at this than companies.
What did you do to get into HR? Did you have a degree in HR or something?
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:45 PM
 
2,242 posts, read 2,423,327 times
Reputation: 4865
Because they could care less about rejected candidates.
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Land Of Moose, Blueberries, and Chickadees
9,929 posts, read 5,145,660 times
Reputation: 12563
The good news is, not all companies are like this. Last year I applied for a job, (I've talked about it on this forum before), and I thought it was going well, (three interviews). I reallllllly wanted this job. It was one of those jobs you don't just take because it's a job, I actually wanted to work there!

Well, I didn't get it.

BUT, I did get a letter and was told they went with the other person, so at least I knew.

It still bummed me out. It still sucked that I didn't get hired for that job but, they were so cool about it that I have applied for a few more jobs at that company. I may not even get an interview, I may not ever get a job there but again, I wanted to work there and knowing that they are NOT the type to just blow people off like that impressed me even more. I still really want to work there so I will continue to try until they either:

a) tell me to stop bugging them, don't I get it?

b) give up and hire me (lol)

I wish more people in HR would understand that a little bit of common courtesy goes a long way with people even if they didn't get the job that time.
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