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Old 03-30-2013, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
11,306 posts, read 10,024,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
not so much evil as stupid and illogical.
Like what?

Lets freshen up this thread. Give me 2 examples of stupid illogical HR practices. My caveat is that they should be typical practices, not things that one HR guy did this one time back in the day.
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Old 03-30-2013, 03:49 PM
 
7,237 posts, read 11,552,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Like what?

Lets freshen up this thread. Give me 2 examples of stupid illogical HR practices. My caveat is that they should be typical practices, not things that one HR guy did this one time back in the day.
1. Personality Tests.

2. Behavorial Interviews.
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Old 03-30-2013, 04:24 PM
 
Location: broke leftist craphole Illizuela
9,898 posts, read 14,860,744 times
Reputation: 18604
Quote:

Lifetime Accomplishments-Writing Assignment


It is the desire of Fujifilm to explore to the fullest degree possible a potential employee’s strength, weaknesses, talents and gifts. Furthermore, it is our belief that a person should be suited to a job in which they can use their unique strengths and gifts during the majority of their working hours.

A person’s strengths, talents and gifts have usually been consistently displayed in one’s life since early childhood up to present day. These unique characteristics are often best seen through the multiple significant accomplishments, achievements, events or situations in an individual’s life.

Your challenge is to think back in your life, from the earliest points possible to the present moment, and write a short narrative on two significant memories that have in common something you did well and enjoyed doing. Also, explain each of these memories as outlined below. If you have any questions about this, please ask, because this exercise largely influences our evaluation of every prospective employee.

Please follow these directions:

1. Name and describe the specific memory (i.e., experience, achievement, accomplishment, etc.) and your approximate age at the time.

2. State what you remember about the details surrounding this memory.

3. Each narrative should have in common that it was something that you did well and enjoyed doing. Both characteristics (did well and enjoyed doing) must have been present. Both are necessary because often in life we achieve significant accomplishments, but our heart really was not in it, and we really did not enjoy
doing it. Please pay careful attention to these criteria.

4. Describe why this event or accomplishment was so significant in helping you understand your strengths, talents and “gifts”.

5. Describe why it so enjoyable.

Below is a real life example from another person’s Lifetime Accomplishments.

An executive recalled one of her favorite memories as a child growing up on a farm. Apparently, one day she found a bird in the barnyard that had a broken wing. She remembered taking thread and wrapping it around the bird’s broken wing.

Over several weeks she nurtured the bird, both feeding it and ensuring that the wing was healing correctly. Her greatest joy came on the day when she was able to go in the barnyard, throw the bird up in the air, and see it fly away.



Do you know what this executive’s job is today? She is a highly skilled, corporate turn-around artist. She is an expert in fixing broken companies, restoring them to health, then letting them fly on their own. Her true gifts and abilities are found in her thrill for fixing broken companies, and yet those same skills would be skills that would be very harmful if she stayed in a company long-term.
Yes I did see this more than once. HR people giving out assignments like this is third grade. After the first time I actually did one and it went nowhere I just walk away every time some off their leash HR bimbo starts jerking me around.
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Old 03-30-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: broke leftist craphole Illizuela
9,898 posts, read 14,860,744 times
Reputation: 18604
HR bimbo: Tell me about a time you had a conflict and how you handled it.
Moron: I screamed at him and threw a beaker at him

HR bimbo: What are your greatest weaknesses?
Moron: I like to sexually harass coworkers, steal lunches, come in late, leave early, am prone to violent outbursts, don't work on a team well.

HR bimbo: Why is there a 1 month gap between 2/09 and 4/09?
Moron: I was committed to a psychiatric facility after lighting my last boss's car on fire.

HR bimbo: Why do you want to work here?
Moron: You pay more than minimum wage and I need a job.

HR bimbo: What would your ideal manager be like.
Moron: Pope Francis I
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Old 03-30-2013, 10:18 PM
 
107 posts, read 361,060 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
HR bimbo: Tell me about a time you had a conflict and how you handled it.
Moron: I screamed at him and threw a beaker at him

HR bimbo: What are your greatest weaknesses?
Moron: I like to sexually harass coworkers, steal lunches, come in late, leave early, am prone to violent outbursts, don't work on a team well.

HR bimbo: Why is there a 1 month gap between 2/09 and 4/09?
Moron: I was committed to a psychiatric facility after lighting my last boss's car on fire.

HR bimbo: Why do you want to work here?
Moron: You pay more than minimum wage and I need a job.

HR bimbo: What would your ideal manager be like.
Moron: Pope Francis I
Brilliant. Behavioral interviewing is so worthless it is not even funny.
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Old 03-30-2013, 10:39 PM
 
107 posts, read 361,060 times
Reputation: 103
It never ceases to amaze me how people like "thebunny" have this unshakable trust in the hiring process. If you did not get selected it is because you were not the most qualfied. It can never be that the hiring manager was a moron or that the hiring practices of a company were deeply flawed. I mean, after all, corporations are filled with people who always perform flawlessly and never get promoted beyond their capacity.

My most recent (probably unsuccessful) venture into the world of interviewing was for an assistant controller trainee position at Marriott on campus at my school. The interviewee was completely behavioral. There was no interest in my capacity to do actual accounting or anything of the sort. Instead I got some convoluted questions about teamwork, etc.

To illustrate the absolute brainless nature of behavioral interviewing I will give a real life example. I did not have any legitimate team work experience in my working days. In my collegiate career "team work" consisted doing 90-95% of all the work because I wanted an "A" and other people were happy with "Cs". I could never say that during an interview instead I have to come up with creative explanations of what teamwork is. A person with a brain would realize that there are all kinds of life situations where "telling the truth" would make the candidate look artificially bad. That is why behavioral interviewing is worthless. By concentrating on what happened before and trying to use it as a predictor or what will happen in the future, you frequently force people to lie to sanitize things you can never say during an interview. If you had a boss that was banging his secretary and you had a problem with the secretary you can't use that real life tid bit as an example of "conflict resolution".

If you want to test certain competencies it is best to do so with hypothetical case studies instead of potentially uncomfortable ventures into someone's past.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
11,306 posts, read 10,024,276 times
Reputation: 18898
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
1. Personality Tests.

2. Behavorial Interviews.
Personality tests seem to be limited to entry level positions at large national chains. I have never seen them used for professional positions. My only guess on this is that those retailers get so many applications that this impediment weeds out a lot of people, which is their goal. You may not like it, but it serves a purpose.

Behavioral interviews make a little bit of sense too. If you have several applicants with similar education/experience, how do you differentiate? Once again, this does make sense from an employers point of view.
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Old 03-31-2013, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
11,306 posts, read 10,024,276 times
Reputation: 18898
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnemployedRage View Post
It never ceases to amaze me how people like "thebunny" have this unshakable trust in the hiring process. If you did not get selected it is because you were not the most qualfied. It can never be that the hiring manager was a moron or that the hiring practices of a company were deeply flawed. I mean, after all, corporations are filled with people who always perform flawlessly and never get promoted beyond their capacity.

My most recent (probably unsuccessful) venture into the world of interviewing was for an assistant controller trainee position at Marriott on campus at my school. The interviewee was completely behavioral. There was no interest in my capacity to do actual accounting or anything of the sort. Instead I got some convoluted questions about teamwork, etc.

To illustrate the absolute brainless nature of behavioral interviewing I will give a real life example. I did not have any legitimate team work experience in my working days. In my collegiate career "team work" consisted doing 90-95% of all the work because I wanted an "A" and other people were happy with "Cs". I could never say that during an interview instead I have to come up with creative explanations of what teamwork is. A person with a brain would realize that there are all kinds of life situations where "telling the truth" would make the candidate look artificially bad. That is why behavioral interviewing is worthless. By concentrating on what happened before and trying to use it as a predictor or what will happen in the future, you frequently force people to lie to sanitize things you can never say during an interview. If you had a boss that was banging his secretary and you had a problem with the secretary you can't use that real life tid bit as an example of "conflict resolution".

If you want to test certain competencies it is best to do so with hypothetical case studies instead of potentially uncomfortable ventures into someone's past.
If they were interviewing on campus for a trainee position, it makes a tremendous amount of sense to interview people based on personality.

The company has indicated a commitment to training, thus the trainee portion of the position announcement.

Because they are interviewing on campus, they are going to get a lot of very similar applicants. They will all be similar ages, with the same credential, and minimal relevant experience. The best way to hire is to go for he person who can effectively work in a team and not be a pain in the ass. By admitting that you do not know how to work effectively in groups, it shows the interviewer that you do not yet possess the skills that they are looking for.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:24 PM
 
107 posts, read 361,060 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
If they were interviewing on campus for a trainee position, it makes a tremendous amount of sense to interview people based on personality.

The company has indicated a commitment to training, thus the trainee portion of the position announcement.

Because they are interviewing on campus, they are going to get a lot of very similar applicants. They will all be similar ages, with the same credential, and minimal relevant experience. The best way to hire is to go for he person who can effectively work in a team and not be a pain in the ass. By admitting that you do not know how to work effectively in groups, it shows the interviewer that you do not yet possess the skills that they are looking for.
Nowhere in my post did I indicate I had issues with team work. I indicated that I had to find creative ways of explaining what I did in college given what really happened is not what the interviewer wants to hear(no interviewer wants to hear that I had bums as team members and did 95% of the work and carried them to points they did not deserve/earn). That point went over your head.

No, there is nothing equal about people applying via on campus interviews. There is a difference between a 4.0 accounting, Beta Alpha Psi, CPA track person and someone barely staying afloat. Given that the company allegedly wanted someone for "long term career growth", a student's potential ability to get a CPA becomes important.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:48 PM
 
Location: broke leftist craphole Illizuela
9,898 posts, read 14,860,744 times
Reputation: 18604
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Personality tests seem to be limited to entry level positions at large national chains. I have never seen them used for professional positions. My only guess on this is that those retailers get so many applications that this impediment weeds out a lot of people, which is their goal. You may not like it, but it serves a purpose.

Behavioral interviews make a little bit of sense too. If you have several applicants with similar education/experience, how do you differentiate? Once again, this does make sense from an employers point of view.
They are creeping more and more into professional positions. I saw them on several of the chemist positions I applied to. Stupidity often spreads like a cold.

Yea makes tons of sense to find competent technical personnel by asking stupid off topic questions that beg candidates to start BSing. I know I don't want anyone picked by an HR bimbo working in my lab. I had that experience once having to clean up after they picked a chemist based in interview nonsense. It is not an experience I care to repeat.
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