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Old 01-10-2013, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,743 posts, read 7,398,556 times
Reputation: 2842
I agree that you should go to your supervisor and ask that someone else be sent to training or that your training be postponed. In that way the $ for the training won't be wasted.

Tell the supervisor that there is important work on your desk that needs attention or if you don't think that excuse will fly come up with something that will.

One week's notice is a minimum, two weeks customary.

If you have done a good job then your friend's recommendation is affirmed. Oh, and before you go, build a personal contact list not using the employer's resources.
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Old 01-10-2013, 04:57 PM
FBJ
 
Location: Tall Building down by the river
33,595 posts, read 22,865,042 times
Reputation: 7378
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
Not saying that I'm not going to take the other opportunity since it's a better one. Just don't want to burn any birdges since I'll possibly deal with people at my current work again (or at least see them at certain functions) from time to time. I currently work for a government employer so layoffs, etc. are not quite so common as for a private employer. People tend to stay here for a while.

I do understand it's just business, though.

What do you mean that layoffs are not common with a government employer?
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Centennial, CO
549 posts, read 558,089 times
Reputation: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
I agree that you should go to your supervisor and ask that someone else be sent to training or that your training be postponed. In that way the $ for the training won't be wasted.

Tell the supervisor that there is important work on your desk that needs attention or if you don't think that excuse will fly come up with something that will.

One week's notice is a minimum, two weeks customary.

If you have done a good job then your friend's recommendation is affirmed. Oh, and before you go, build a personal contact list not using the employer's resources.
I should clarify that I do not have an actual offer from the company yet but could receive one next week. Thus, saying I can't or won't go to the training would look awfully suspicious, don't you think? In case I don't get an offer I don't want to jeopardize my current employment!
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:52 PM
 
5,161 posts, read 5,079,804 times
Reputation: 5140
Keep everything normal with your current job until the moment you resign. Attend training. Don't give any hints of leaving. The offer could be delayed for months or could happen next week or maybe it never happens. CYA.
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Old 01-10-2013, 06:59 PM
 
2,244 posts, read 2,427,406 times
Reputation: 4865
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
I would be up front, and not attend the training. Tell them you want to wrap up some projects.

That seems ethical to me.

But, two weeks, and move on. After all, I always find it interesting if employees want to move on, we give a two week notice. If employers want you to "move on", they tell you, and expect you to pack your desk that hour.
Interesting double standard, isn't it?
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:42 PM
 
Location: California
4,404 posts, read 5,084,313 times
Reputation: 2992
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
I started a position with my current employer about months ago knowing that I was going to be looking for something in my preferred career field soon, but I needed SOMETHING to pay the bills, and it was an easy job for me to get (and not a bad one either, just not what I want to do). I am in the final interview phase with another company and could have an offer by the end of next week. The problem is this: there are two people in my current role, and the other person just resigned a couple weeks ago and final day is the end of next week. Some of her projects have been transitioned over to me. So now they have the expectation I'll be taking over these projects that were her's yet I can't tell them yet that I might be leaving soon when it's not yet a sure thing.

Obviously this will leave my current employer in a tough situation with BOTH people in my position leaving. I hold no ill will towards my current employer, but if I get the offer next week I HAVE to take it as it's a much better career opportunity in the field I really want to be in (plus better pay).

How do I tell them I'm leaving in a way that is tactful and without making my boss and fellow co-workers angry?
1. Give the notice expected by the employer. 2 weeks, a month, whatever is customary in your company.
2. Continue to do your job while in the notice period.

You are not expected to sign up for a job for life. Handle it with class.
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:58 PM
 
8,347 posts, read 6,911,359 times
Reputation: 8797
Well, you first wait until you have your offered in writing. Then you give notice...just like any other position. It happens everyday. I don't think you should worry about the employees feelings towards you...But, I'd definitely wait til your new offer is a sure things.
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Old 01-10-2013, 08:14 PM
 
2,244 posts, read 2,427,406 times
Reputation: 4865
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
Well, you first wait until you have your offered in writing.
I've never gotten a job offer in writing. It is always verbal and over the phone.
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Old 01-10-2013, 08:30 PM
 
5,523 posts, read 4,878,604 times
Reputation: 4619
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
I started a position with my current employer about months ago knowing that I was going to be looking for something in my preferred career field soon, but I needed SOMETHING to pay the bills, and it was an easy job for me to get (and not a bad one either, just not what I want to do). I am in the final interview phase with another company and could have an offer by the end of next week. The problem is this: there are two people in my current role, and the other person just resigned a couple weeks ago and final day is the end of next week. Some of her projects have been transitioned over to me. So now they have the expectation I'll be taking over these projects that were her's yet I can't tell them yet that I might be leaving soon when it's not yet a sure thing.

Obviously this will leave my current employer in a tough situation with BOTH people in my position leaving. I hold no ill will towards my current employer, but if I get the offer next week I HAVE to take it as it's a much better career opportunity in the field I really want to be in (plus better pay).

How do I tell them I'm leaving in a way that is tactful and without making my boss and fellow co-workers angry?
If the company wanted to fire you, how would they tell you in a 'tactful' way without making YOU angry?

In other words, who cares??

They wouldn't care about YOU or YOUR financial struggles, so why should you care about theirs?

Whatever you do, DO NOT TELL THEM WHERE YOUR NEW JOB IS or what field it's in.

Just say you are leaving due to "relocation" or some crap.
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Old 01-10-2013, 08:34 PM
 
5,523 posts, read 4,878,604 times
Reputation: 4619
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
I should clarify that I do not have an actual offer from the company yet but could receive one next week. Thus, saying I can't or won't go to the training would look awfully suspicious, don't you think? In case I don't get an offer I don't want to jeopardize my current employment!
Go to the training and don't worry about it. You don't have an offer yet, so it's not an issue as of yet.

Look, go LIVE YOUR LIFE. It's the GOVERNMENT. There are MILLIONS of people waiting to take your place.
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