U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-09-2013, 03:39 PM
 
161 posts, read 90,891 times
Reputation: 223

Advertisements

I have a niece that's going to be a senior next year and another niece who is a junior in college. The one that's in h.s. doesn't really know what she wants to do except she knows she needs to go to college. She said she doesn't want to go for something that'll make her unhappy even if it'll make her a lot of money. I basically told her that in today's world, it's not about pursuing your passion anymore unless your passion happens to be in a field that's highly in demand right now and in the next several years. I told her that she can always pursue her passion on the side because pursuing your passion is like winning the lottery.

My other niece who's in college is going into psychology because she made up her mind that business is not for her. I had recently told them that fields in business, finance, healthy industry, etc. have better prospects and are more reliable than the liberal arts areas. I don't know...I feel kind of bad because I'm all about passion too, but I told them they need to make a living first. I feel like I was telling them to give up on their dreams. I know some make it, but not all!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-09-2013, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Texas!!! It's hot but I don't care :)
469 posts, read 810,003 times
Reputation: 173
It's good to have passion but it's important to have a job that makes money. I would strongly recommend community college or a tech school program if they don't know what they want to do. I know several people who never went to college that all make way more money than I will ever obtain in my graduate school master's degree licensed field :/

For your niece going into psychology....hopefully she understands that she will not be able to do ANYTHING at all in psychology or counseling with just a bachelor's degree. She will need a master's degree and then she will not be making a lot of money so I would tell her to avoid student loans AT ALL COSTS.

But you also have to remember, by the time they get into the job market years from now...it will be very different. I went to college in a good job market, came out to get a job in a BAD one and it just got worse from there. So there's really no telling....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 04:05 PM
 
6,588 posts, read 4,382,168 times
Reputation: 7933
"She said she doesn't want to go for something that'll make her unhappy even if it'll make her a lot of money."

Goodness, if I had a dime every time I heard that, including from myself. But the world is not big enough for people to make money, any money, doing something they truly like doing. So the next best option is to make a lot of money doing something you do not enjoy, and do the enjoyment on the side. I do not think anyone is going to be paying me any time soon to travel for fun, and drink mojitos in Key West.

"My other niece who's in college is going into psychology"

I never understood, and will never understand why people do this.

Too many college kids think they are going to major in some social area, then go change the world for the better.

Best advice is; watch your debt. With no debt, a person truly has options in life. Debt is like a heavy chain around your neck when trying to swim.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 04:14 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle, originally from SF Bay Area
14,537 posts, read 17,640,263 times
Reputation: 10011
I would never recommend that someone get a degree to enable them to get a job doing something they hate. High school graduates often don't know what they want to do and for them it may be too soon to go to college. Often people "have to go to college" so they do, rack up huge student loans, then decide they had the "wrong" major. Often working and/or traveling for 2-3 years will help them see what is going on in the adult world and spark an interest in a career that suits them. Even in the recent economy I know people that are making enough to survive doing work they enjoy, while they could have made a more comfortable living doing something that pays better but is not interesting to them. Doing your passion is a dream that few can realize, but doing something meaningful and enjoyable while still having a roof over your head and food in the refrigerator is still possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 04:23 PM
 
6,588 posts, read 4,382,168 times
Reputation: 7933
The job does not have to be something they hate; the advice is more along the line of that most things people like to do, there is no market for. So while being an accountant at one of the big accounting firms is not the most exciting thing to do, a person may not hate it, just maybe dislike, apathy, no feeling, etc.

Most of the jobs I hate (and probably most people) do not require any formal education.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 05:38 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 4,224,680 times
Reputation: 3853
I would say whatever you do and whatever you major in, that you do very well in school and get as high of a GPA as possible at as good of a college you can get into that is financially feasible.

That way, if you decide to change course some time later, all doors are still open to you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 06:25 PM
 
1,010 posts, read 672,013 times
Reputation: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by etjaipleure View Post
For your niece going into psychology....hopefully she understands that she will not be able to do ANYTHING at all in psychology or counseling with just a bachelor's degree. She will need a master's degree and then she will not be making a lot of money so I would tell her to avoid student loans AT ALL COSTS.
Not true at all. Having a Psych degree does not just limit you to a career in mental/behavioral health. You can do a ton of things with just an undergrad and make a pretty decent living with it. Many CRCs have that degree and end up being very successful (and lucrative) CRAs. If an industry route isn't desired, you can pursue a future in academia/non-profit and become a specialist/associate and end up co-author on manuscripts. If you don't want to go into research, there are other areas you can look into as well.

Anyway

OP, what does your niece actually want to do with a Psych undergrad? I would strongly advise not to pick a major for the sole reason of just making bank. We spend most of our days at work. Why would you want to spend most of your day miserable?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 06:37 PM
 
2,301 posts, read 2,587,921 times
Reputation: 5100
Go to an inexpensive community college and live with your parents while you go to school if they will let you. Work part time while you go to school and pay 100% of your tuition with cash. Work towards a 1-2 year technical program. Many graduates from those programs make more than people with bachelor's and master's degrees, often times much more. Also, you don't have to waste your time and money on fluff elective courses that are required like philosophy and art history courses. The curriculum is specifically geared towards what you will be doing when you get out.

Only go to a 4 year university immediately after graduating from high school if you receive a full scholarship and you know exactly what you want to do and it requires a bachelor's or master's. Absolutely do not go into debt and waste 4 years of your life on some random degree in whatever "because that is what you are supposed to do."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 06:40 PM
 
2,282 posts, read 1,413,520 times
Reputation: 4522
Don't graduate without relevant work experience. Volunteer if you can't find anything paid, but do not graduate with nothing but a grocery store or whatever on your resume! Your education is only PART of the package. Too many students don't realize this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2013, 06:45 PM
 
1,010 posts, read 672,013 times
Reputation: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
Don't graduate without relevant work experience. Volunteer if you can't find anything paid, but do not graduate with nothing but a grocery store or whatever on your resume! Your education is only PART of the package. Too many students don't realize this.
Absolutely agree.


I would go as far as to say, choose a university that is not only strong in your desired field, but also one that offers co-op/stresses internships. You'll not only gain experience in your area of study, you'll also learn basic job search/interviewing skills (which is severely lacking judging from a lot of threads in this forum). You'll graduate with an established professional network and pertinent experience on your resume.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:18 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top